Archive for ‘Databases’

March 3, 2018

13 Million Person Family Tree — #Science #Genealogy #Math

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

70,000 person tree

The Scientists…:

Joanna Kaplanis1,2, *, Assaf Gordon1,2, *, Tal Shor3,4, Omer Weissbrod5, Dan Geiger4, Mary Wahl1,2,6, Michael Gershovits2, Barak Markus2, Mona Sheikh2, Melissa Gymrek1,2,7,8,9, Gaurav Bhatia10,11, Daniel G. MacArthur7,9,10, Alkes L. Price10,11,12, Yaniv Erlich1,2,3,13,14,

  •  1 New York Genome Center, New York, NY 10013, USA.
  •  2 Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
  •  3 MyHeritage, Or Yehuda 6037606, Israel.
  •  4 Computer Science Department, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel.
  •  5 Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001, Israel.
  •  6 Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
  •  7 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  •  8 Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
  •  9 Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • 10 Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
  • 11 Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  • 12 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  • 13 Department of Computer Science, Fu Foundation School of Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
  • 14 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

* Contributed equally    Corresponding author. Email:

… published an article in Science  01 Mar 2018,  “Quantitative analysis of population-scale family trees with millions of relatives”.

Science Mag AAM —

They started with 110 Million Available in They used software to do data analysis and they downloaded 86 Million persons from From that set of data they did cleansing and transformation to winnow the data down to 13 Million individuals.

read more »

April 3, 2017

Polonia In Canadian Expeditionary Forces in WWI — #Genealogy #Polish 🇨🇦🇺🇸

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

How to find government military records.

If you have a name of an ancestor who may have fought at Vimy , you should start by searching Library and Archives Canada’s online database of Personnel Records of the First World War.

The Personnel Records of the First World War database includes the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service files.

So far (1-April-2017), nearly 417,000 out of 640,000 of these full files have been digitized, with more added every two weeks.

The service files are typically 25 to 75 pages long and include records on enlistment, training, medical and dental procedures, disciplinary actions, payments, medals, discharges and deaths.

In cases where the full service file isn’t yet uploaded, you may still be able see digitized enlistment records that contain birthplaces, next of kin, addresses, religions, trades and physical characteristics.

Start by typing in the surname and hitting search on this page. Click on the name in the search results. You will likely see an uploaded image of their enlistment document that you can click on that to enlarge it.

If you also see the words “Digitized service file – PDF format” followed by a number, click on the number and the entire scanned service file will open. These files are very large so it may require a fast internet connection to download, or take minutes to appear on your screen.

For example, you can see the first nine pages of John Lescinski’s service record (top of blog). In thus case there were forty (40) pages in the accompanying PDF.

It’s not always clear in the service files whether a person served in a particular battle, like at Vimy Ridge. However, that may be found in the online database of War Diaries of the First World War, which include daily accounts of what troops did in the field. These diaries contain very little personal information, but do show where units were deployed.

Take care. It only showed my first two pages with a link to download the PDF (which actually had 40 pages).

My link (John Lescinski):

June 15, 2016

RootsWeb Upgrade — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


“We are currently working to move the entirety of RootsWeb to new machinery that can handle the load and be backed up in a consistent and reliable manner,” says’s Anne Mitchell.
“Ancestry is making the switchover this week. During that time, you may notice short periods when RootsWeb is unavailable.”

Ancestry Insider believes that RootsWeb / Ancestry are making this upgrade to generate good will.

After the RootsWeb crash back in February,  the RootsWeb community, expressed themselves effectively and Ancestry is responding! When Ancestry acquired RootsWeb, they said they would keep it running.

Thank you Ancestry for keeping that promise.

Rootsweb is a very old genealogy resource that just needed some love to keep and enhance its usefulness to the genealogical community.

Stanczyk complained and apparently other Rootsweb users were also complaining that new additions to RootsWeb were not being indexed. This includes GEDCOMs uploaded to WorldConnect, Obituary Daily Times, and mail archives. This jester had to drop my trees and move to Tribalpages.

So, after this upgrade is finished, Ancestry will have fixed that. If it is indeed fixed, perhaps Stanczyk can move a family tree back.

You may have experienced some data loss the last time RootsWeb went down. That will not be happening during the outages this week, as these are planned, controlled, outages.

February 2, 2016

Family Tree Maker (FTM) — Please update the death date!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Ok the death date for FTM software needs to be updated from 31-DECEMBER-2015 to <null>. It appears that FTM’s death was greatly exagerated!

It appears Ancestry has two solutions …

  1. RootsMagic – TreeSynch, Hints, Ancestry Search, Direct Import for people converting from FTM (no intermediate gedcom necessary).
  2. MacKiev – Will takeover development & publishing of FTM. For over six years MacKiev had done the development for FTM. 

More details are at’s blog .

January 4, 2016

Kielce Holdings Possible in GenBaza … — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielcach Archive Holdings

              partial pdf table of Kielce church/synagouge books

Stanczyk, was looking at the GenBaza news of what was being indexed and loaded in order to see what was coming online (… eventually). This jester noticed a PDF document of the inventory of books at Diocessan Archives (AD), State Archive (AP) and in some of the parishes too.

Now let me hasten to add that this is NOT an inventory of online records/images. It is only a list of what may yet come and of course some of these are already online, but many more are just potential data available to be indexed and loaded.

The actual PDF document is here . A final note the Fond# is similar to what the Library of Congress calls a Record Group. It is the identifier for requesting the resource inside the archive. Only State Archives have a Fond#, not the church archive nor the church parish.


 Fond #  Place Name Date Range Books Count Count of Images     NOTES
Bebelno 1787-1864  13 1,174  AD
Bejsce 1586-1862  37 3,966  AD
Biechów 1674-1855  50 3,598  AD
355 Pacanów 1875-1908 64 3,703  AP
373 Pacanów moj 1875-1912  55 1,957  AP (jewish)
399 Pałecznica 1861-1911  77 3,235  AP
December 12, 2015

Anna Slavinska, from Sulislawice

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk got another genealogical question. It was from Cris (on

Cris wrote …




Cris, welcome to my blog. I have good news so please keep reading. As you no doubt know, I have SLAWINSKI in my own family tree. Most likely you will find your name in Polish Archive / Church records written as SŁAWIŃSKI in Polish and as СЛАВИНСКИЙЬ in Russian records.

From I have a map of your ancestral village (Sulislawice, 50,587500   21,468333  – see pink circle).

population 353 people (osoby)
woj.        świętokrzyskie
pow.       Sandomierski
gmina   Łoniów



Since your ancestral village is near to Sandomierz, I knew it would be in Kielce AP (state archive of Poland) and in particular its office in Sandomierz AP.  This Kielce / Sandomierz area is where the overwhelming majority of my Polish ancestors come from. As a result, I knew to check to see if your grandmother Anna Slawinska might have her records online. The good news is yes, those records are online in GenBaza. It has Sulislawice (which is also the parish) in the years:  1810-1910 [inclusive].

You will need to be able to read Polish for records 1810-1868 (possibly Latin before 1820). For records in the years 1869-1910, they will be written in Russian/Cyrillic characters.

You will also need to register for userid / password on (which takes you to and do so in Polish to gain access to that database of church record images.  This is doable, but not a trivial task. Once you get an email with your userid/password, contact me again and I will post the link to my blog where I wrote a user guide to using the website.

But it is the holiday season and your Slawinski may be relatives of my Slawinski. So this jester is willing to find your grandmother’s birth record (if she was in fact born in Sulislawice). To do so, please  contact me in Ancestry again with:

  1. Your grandmother’s birth date (the year must be in the range 1810 … 1910)
  2. Your grandmother’s parents names (great-grandparents).

I will use that info to search for and send you the birth record if I find it. I will also provide a translation of the key genealogical facts (dates, names, ages, etc.) from what I am expecting will be a Russian language record.


Happy Holidays !


1886 – Akt (Record) #47 – Stefan Slawinski son of Stanislaw Slawinski & Marianna Jarok in Gieraszowice


November 11, 2015

Dobrowoda & Fras/Frass Genealogy — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dobrowoda Dobrowoda, “Good Water” indeed. Its about 15-16 km from my paternal grandmother (babcia/Busia), Waleria’s ancestral village (Biechow). Waleria Leszczynska’s (half-)sister, Agnieszka married her 2nd husband, Wladyslaw Fras … somewhere (I am still looking for that marriage). Agnieszka & Waleria (the Leszczynscy) were born in Biechow so you might expect their marriage was there in the bride’s village as is custom.  But let me start this genealogical story from the beginning.

A few years ago, my family tree on the Internet caused someone to email me about my Leszczynski. For years, other genealogists had emailed about LESZCZYNSKI, so I was used to saying, “Its a popular name and we are not related or are so distantly related that we cannot prove it.” But this person had a name, Agnieszka Leszczynski, which I had one too in my tree, but she was born so long ago (1866) that I only had a birth record and nothing more for Agnieszka Leszczynski. But she had a Russian Passport (which she could not read). I had never seen an actual Russian Passport before, so I told her I would look at it and help translate what info I could and perhaps that will tell us whether there is a chance that her ancestor (great-grandfather), Jozef Fras, was son of my Agnieszka Leszczynski or not. Long Story-Short, the passport gave clues to the same area, tantalizingly close to Biechow — so I could neither prove nor disprove the relationship, but it was an avenue for research. So I started researching her Fras/Frass from Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. They were close to where my grandparents and my grand-aunt, Antonina Leszczynska Sobieszczanski lived. Ok that added a very tenuous connection.  I found a church baptism where Jozef Fras’s wife, BENIGNA (not a common name) was a God Mother to one of my dad’s Sobieszczanski cousins. Ok. that is a pretty good connection. Next I found Jozef’s ship manifest and that his father was Wladyslaw Fras living in Piersciec, a village in the same parish as my grandmother’s family. Ok that is a great connection. Oh, look Jozef went from his father, Wladyslaw, to his uncle Teofil Leszczynski (my grand-uncle) in Depew, Erie County, NY. Ok that is a solid family indicator. So I emailed Mindy to tell her that we were probably related and I added Fras to my family tree.

So Mindy sent me family photos of other Fras family from Poland. So I knew Jozef had two brothers and a sister (maybe) and I had their names. From the passport I had a birthdate / birthplace for Jozef (Zborow – which I initially mistook for Zborowek, but later realized he meant the Zborow near Solec, at any rate both were in Kielce gubernia. So I had Biechow and Solec as possible parishes to research. Eventually GenBaza published images online and I could progress, I did find Jozef’s siblings: Teofil & Wincenty(and two sisters born in Piestrzec/Piersciec). But I could not find Jozef and I also could not locate Wladyslaw and Agnieszka’s marriage record in Biechow or Solec (nor in Stopnica). I began to research in nearby parishes (cluster genealogy) looking for either the birth or the marriage record. Years went by and no luck.

Did I mention that GenBaza went offline due to technical problems? It did and when it came back I noticed a few new parishes, hence Dobrowoda (which was >= 15km away) and I doubted that a parish at such a distance might yield any new clues. However, earlier I had found a church record in Stopnica of a Fras birth, where a Wladyslaw Fras was God Father. I then found the marriage and alegata for the couple whom Wladyslaw was God Father for. It turned out that Fras was originally from Silesia [Uiejsce, in Wojkowice Koscielne parish, in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia, Poland]. I found this Fras’ birth record and now had his parents (possibly Wladyslaw’s parents or maybe just uncle/aunt). Using Geneteka as an index, I found other children for Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas, besides this Stopnica Fras. This family went from Wojkowice Koscielne parish in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia to Holudza village in Chotel Czerwony parish, in Kielce Gubernia. OK now we are getting close. I found Jan Fras’ death record in Kikow village in Dobrowoda parish (also Kielce Gubernia). So when Dobrowoda came online, I decided I would look there once GenBaza came back online.

That is where this blog entry starts. There were many years and I was not expecting any Fras really. So I started in Zborowek instead which now had metrical records and not just alegata like before. Some minor advances, but nothing really. So I looked at Dobrowoda. There were many years in Dobrowoda and my eyes went right to a book that ended in ‘rejestr’. These ‘rejestr’ tend to be church censuses, sometimes just an annual census, sometimes a decade, sometimes two-three generations. So I thought I could quickly scan and see if there were any Fras or not in this parish.

It was just an annual census (my hopes were lowered) for 1895 sorted alphabetically with Birth Marriage and Death records indexed together (in a funky Polish handwriting – that I had to train my eyes to read). Ok there was a Fras, a Teofil Fras. But I had already found my Teofil Fras born in 1903, so this Teofil Fras born in 1895 must be for another family. Nonetheless, I wanted the record to see if Wladyslaw or Agnieszka Fras were a God Parent or witness. So I was shocked to find that this Teofil Fras was also a child of Wladyslaw Fras and Agnieszka Leszczynska. This Teofil must have died and thus the second Teofil was born in 1903 (who is the one in my picture with Wincenty). Ok this parish had my Fras. Maybe I can find the birth of Jozef and/or the marriage of Wladyslaw & Agnieszka here. From the passport, I knew that Jozef was born in 1893, so I went to that year. Guess what I found? Yes, I finally found Jozef Fras’  birth record and the date matched as well as the parents.

Alas, I still did not find the marriage record of Wladyslaw and Agnieszka, but now I have hope. I hope I can find their marriage and also Wladyslaw’s birth (once I confirm that his parents are indeed Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas). You must persevere. These affiliated families (like Fras) can indicate parishes to research in for your main lines and shorten your cluster genealogy search. But as you saw, Dobrowoda was indeed good water for Stanczyk.

Jozef Fras birth record:

Jozef Fras Akt #23

Jozef Fras Akt #23

May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:



Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:


The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.


For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.

May 16, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland — #Genealogy #Polish #History #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was combing through  (aka PTG). In their discussions they mentioned a new website with an interactive map of Poland from the 16th century. That was excellent and I will discuss it this blog article and continue in the next with examples. But I decided to see what else the website had and that is how this jester go to:

Atlas of Sources and Materials for History of Old Poland

If you see the polish language version, merely click on the British flag to see English language. This site has seven assets worth perusing and examining in depth, including the interactive map of the Polish Kingdom in the 16th century (16w).

  1. Polish Territories of the Crown in the 16th century.  Spatial Database
  2. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Kalisz in the 16th Century
  3. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Poznań in the 16th Century
  4. Religions and Confessions in the Polish Crown in the 2nd half of the 18th Century
  5. The Court Records of Wschowa, 1495-1526
  6. Register of Protestant communities in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
    in the 16th-18th centuries
  7. Parish libraries of Wiślica praeposite in the second half of the 18th century


This blog is primarily about Kielce wojewodztwo (or gubernia) and some surrounding areas too. So while I dutifully inform my readers who are interested in other Polish Genealogical matters or Geographical area that there are Tax Registers for  KALISZ or POZNAN. There are also a statistical record of ALL religions in the Polish Kingdom of the 18th century (very useful for classifying your ancestral parish’s congregation or identifying a synagogue location). Likewise, the register of PROTESTANT congregations in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth for 16th-18th centuries (16w-18w). This jester did not investigate the court records … yet. Lastly,  the parish libraries of Wislica is heavy Latin lifting, so while I did peruse and find some possible future gems, I will skip this too. So I will return to the 1st item in the list, the interactive map which is a treasure for all wojewodztwa (provinces/states/voivodes).


Here is the link (using English, clicking above link will lead to an intermediate set of choices which uses Polish map):

You should see:



Let’s type ‘Pacanów’ (no quotes, and diacriticals are needed). Since it is inconvenient to enter diacriticals, you can start typing and let the software, autocomplete for you (thus supplying the necessary diacritical). Keep in mind that this what Poland looked like in the 16th century! So that is why you see Wislica ‘District’ and the Sandomierz wojewodztwo in the pop-up box — which you should promptly close . Next we need to zoom as, all you can see is the blue-green box that represents Pacanów (not the actual text). So in the lower left of your screen is the zoom tool. Click on plus 2-3 times or drag the little slider arrow or you can do as I did and enter ‘100000’ (no quotes) into Scale field at the bottom.

You should see:



Now you notice villages with green boxes (ex. Solec, Swiniary, Biechow, etc.). These are parishes that existed in the 16th century.

— — — — — — Diacritcals to Use:

ą Ćć ę Łł ń ó Śś Źź Żż


Next time we will examine the map further.


March 15, 2015 – What’s Happening in March ? – #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Parafia Michałów


Stanczyk wanted to check-in on GenBaza and what has been going on for the old Wojewodztwo/Gubernia Kielce.

Thank You Kornelia! So here are the GenBaza updates:


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parish, [sfotografowała parafię]
Michałów (1711-1904) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym].


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Orthodox parishes, [sfotografowała parafię prawosławne]
Miechów (1892-1912) and also
Nowe Brzesko (1906-1908) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Jewish congregation in, [sfotografowała parafie]
Sobków_moj (1810, 1826-1912) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parishes, [sfotografowała parafie]
Waśniów (1890-1910) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym] and also
Wiślica Gmina (1755-1825) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

February 14, 2015

St. Stanislaus Cemetery — Hamilton, MERCER COUNTY, NJ — #Genealogy #Volunteer

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Stanczyk was taking a road trip last weekend.

I took a page out of Jonathan Shea’s book, “Going Home”. In an Appendix, he lists the Polish Cemeteries across the USA. So in a kind of RAOGK, and as a way to contribute to PGSCT&NE, I started to take pics of tombstones and transcribe the pics for an index.

In a single visit I was able to do about 40% of the cemetery. I of course, am sending my entire contribution to PGSCT&NE. But, two tombstones had pics attached to the tombstone and I admired these two tombstones so much, I also added them to FindAGrave.

#Volunteer genealogists; Its another way to collaborate.

Below is the one from the Maławski family (click to enlarge):


Marcin, Stanislawa Malawski

December 4, 2014

GenBaza News – New OnLine Records … #Polish #Genealogy #Genealogia #Polska

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk noted the news from Genbaza over the last two weeks:

Please note the phrase, “dostęp tylko dla indeksujących” means only access to indexes (for indexing?). So it appears we will be getting some new data (and/or images) online very soon.

Some of the parishes/cities are given first in Polish followed by their German name (i.e. Prussian-Poland partition). An example is:  Mierzyn [pl] – Alt Marrin [de]

Here is what they are working on …


Nowości w GenBazie

2014-12-02 dodałem — do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących
USC Sowno – Zowen
USC Mierzyn – Alt Marrin
USC Stanomino – Standenmin

2014-11-30 — do katalogu AP Kielce (dostęp tylko dla indeksujących)
Książnica Wielka 1699-1906
Kurzelów 1733-1913
Pierzchnica 1875-1913
Tarłów 1810-1873

2014-11-29 — do katalogu AP Gdańsk zindeksowane USC
USC Okalice
USC Leźno
USC Konarzyny Kościerskie – uzupełnienie

2014-11-28  — do katalogu AP Kielce
uzupełnienia Parafii Odrowąż (1909-1912) [Editor. – Parish Supplement]

— do katalogu AP Grodzisk
Grodziec 1909-1912
Czerwińsk alegaty 1808-1822
Leszno alegaty 1826-1837
Nieporęt 1907r
Zaborów alegaty 1855r
Izdebna alegaty 1816 i 1819r
Grodzisk Mazowiecki alegaty 1808-1825

— do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących/Zugriff nur für die Indizierung
USC Smęcino – Schmenzin
USC Spore – Sprasse
USC Stare Drawsko – Drahim
USC Stary Chwalim – Valm

Good Luck Hunting!

July 18, 2014

Family Search – An Inventory of Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk,  frequently has written about the online inventories where the Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo parish records, scanned images or indexes  exist. I have written about Geneteka, GenBaza, etc. But did you know that Family Search also has some?

Buried within:

You can find the list of parishes at:  Family Search (Kielce) 

At present we find parishes have some online scans:



July 15, 2014 What’s New — #Genealogy, #Online, #Databases

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

WhatsNew_20140715Dateline 14-JULY-2014 — As the image shows …

There are six new databases available in, including Canadian and Peruvian data.

The 1920 and 1940 US Censuses alone are over 240 Million indexed records with images. Frequently the Family Search images are superior in quality to the Ancestry images. This has been true for other databases like the US World War I Draft Registrations whose quality was such that I could read the street addresses that previously in Ancestry had been unreadable. So if you have any 1920/1940 census images that were a bit sketchy to read, give these a try. You may also find the indexes differ from Ancestry indexes for the same images — so the moral of the story is to look at these as well in case a new indexing provides you access to record you previously were unable to find in Ancestry.


July 3, 2014

Kielce Parishes On-line in SzukajWArchiwach — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Previously, Stanczyk has written about what is available online for the former Gubernia (or Województwo) Kielce. In this article I am listing the parishes online with year ranges and scan image counts. Please notice that links are provided for you to go directly to those you are interested in or you can go to the list of all parishes available (since as you know an article like this becomes out of date periodically).


Poland’s Archives (Kielce) Parish Year Range Scans #
21/1700/0 Brzegach 1810-1912  5,652
21/1701/0 Chomentowie 1810-1939  5,997
21/1702/0 Ciernie 1810-1907  5,717
21/1703/0 Imielnie 1810-1912  9,680
21/1704/0 Jędrzejowie 1812-1911  18,045
21/1705/0 Korytnicy 1810-1912  –
21/1706/0 Kozłowie 1811-1913  5,795
21/1707/0 Krzcięcicach 1810-1912  9,569
21/1708/0 Łukowej 1811-1909  4,732

Parishes (Parafia):  Brzegach,  Chomentowie,  Ciernie,  Imielnie,  Jędrzejowie,  Korytnicy,  Kozłowie,  Krzcięcicach,  Łukowej

Cut and Save— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

July 2, 2014

Death Certificates & Death Certificates — #Genealogy, #DeathCertificates

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk knows that genealogy is only as good as your sources. The less sourced your family tree, the less the quality of the research. Death is final! It is also well known that death documents are the least reliable as the informant is often incorrect or misinformed and that misinformation is transmitted to authorities. So newbie genealogists be forewarned.

Stanczyk has had a career (outside of being a jester) as a computer professional and more specifically, an expert in data (gathering, organizing, loading, managing and analyzing data). As a consultant, we have this little aphorism, “A man with a watch ALWAYS knows what time it is. And a man with two watches is never sure what time it is.”  What does this mean? It means data/info is often in conflict and that one or both of those watches is inaccurate. One watch at least, but maybe both are wrong if they disagree with each other.  Genealogy has this problem.

A few days ago, this jester was delighted to discover that Family Search provides a Photo Duplication Service for its databases that are index only — no images uploaded, just the transcribed index. What a boon that has been for me. I was finally able to locate a death certificate for a first-cousin-twice-removed (or my paternal grandfather’s first cousin if you prefer). I was thrilled, I now knew factually his father’s name and that the Polish Church record of his birth was for this individual in the USA that spelled his name like, ‘ELYASZ’. Polish/Slavic genealogists must deal with many factors in name corruption or name change. So I confirmed that this man in Detroit, was my grandfather’s cousin. I confirmed his death and his burial at Mt. Olivet in Detroit. I also confirmed that he was married and that his wife/widow was Lorraine Kraft Elyasz (the informant of the death certificate). But let me pause the story there.

A few years ago, when I visited Michigan, I went to the county seat of Macomb County, Michigan (Mt Clemens). So I made a research visit to the clerk of courts. My primary goal was to get death certificates for people in my life I had known, but lacked their death certificates: mother, grandmother, aunt were the primary goals — success. But I wanted my grand-uncle John (aka Jan) Eliasz who had the bad sense to die in 1936 instead of the modern post-World War II era. I did locate his death date and they had to mail me that death certificate because it was off-site due to its age. No online data for those death certificates (pre-1960). So here is what I received in the mail …


Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

I knew the document was an extract. Just by the format of the death certificate. I was crest-fallen, extracted data is often error-prone and this was a death document the least reliable so that is a double-whammy! Later on, I found out that the age of my grand-uncle was wrong when I located his birth record from the church in Pacanow. So I knew that the age in years,months,days was just plain wrong.  Obviously, the spelling of the name was incorrect (Elias [sic] vs. Eliasz/Elijasz) and the ‘recording date’ led me to believe that this extraction was from a death return (similar to a marriage return)  which is again a further generation removed from a death certificate. Can you just imagine the error propagation rate?

So emboldened by my photo duplication success of Stanley Elyasz, I decided to order the photo duplication for John Elias too. I was hoping that maybe, just maybe they had the image of the actual death certificate. Do you know what I got back yesterday?


Actual Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

 So, bless Family Search for producing a copy of the actual death certificate. Not much in conflict with the “extracted” form. But look at all of the extra info available:  Informant name/address, cemetery where buried, years in occupation, last year worked 1930 (6 years out of work during the Great Depression),  name of wife (Margaret ??? actually Pelagia), years lived in town of death (9 years => 1927 residence North Gratiot Ave, in Clinton Township), years in the USA (3o years => arrived 1906, I can only substantiate since 1910 which would be 26 years). Ok some of the extra information was also wrong, including birth date as I mentioned above.

So what did Stanley Elyasz’s death certificate look like  …


Stanley M. Elyasz

Interestingly enough both of these two gentlemen, who were first cousins also lived together in Detroit in 1921 at the 6410 Van Dyke Ave, Detroit, Wayne, MI [same as Stanley’s death certificate address]. I assume John moved from that address when his cousin died in 1923.

While sources may conflict isn’t it better to have them than not? Also, do not assume that there is only one Death Certificate. See above for my two death certificates for my grand-uncle John Elias [sic]. While they were not in conflict with each other, the second one was the much preferred one to have; I am glad I did not stop at the first one – in genealogy there are death certificates and then there are death certificates – they may not agree. Finally, bless my grand-aunt Mary Eliasz Gronek, but boy was she an error propagator. On my grand-father’s death certificate, she was NOT the informant (my grandmother was). But apparently after the fact, my grand-aunt submitted an affidavit and changed my grandfather’s birthdate. Unfortunately, she changed it from the correct date to a terribly wrong date. For years I had to keep three dates for my grandfather’s birth until I finally located his birth record in Pacanow. Then you learn what is truth and who are the good sources (or bad sources) of family information.

June 29, 2014 — Photoduplication Services — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Did you know that you can submit a request to Family Search for Photo Duplication service of one of their indexed databases for a found indexed record?

Stanczyk did not know either. Then I read: “How to order an indexed document from Family Search” by Selma Blackmon .  At any rate, you can follow her steps to submit a request. I was able to utilize the info she wrote and submit a request (I am waiting for my emailed document, but I will update my readers when I get the result). Now you only get an email with an attachment of the image for the indexed record, which you request.

I’ll save you a few steps by putting the link below (so you do not have to search for it)



  1. You need an account [they are free].  Go to and click on “Join For Free” to register.
  2. After you have registered and you login to your new account, go to:
  3. Lookup your indexed record. In Stanczyk’s case I chose the database: “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,”
  4. Notice that is only an index without any images. So I wanted to order the image of the death certificate I was interested in.
  5. I searched on “Elyasz” to get the info for Stanley M. Elyasz in order to submit the request
  6. I read the instruction from the above Photoduplication Services web page.
  7. I clicked on the green button, “Photoduplication Request Form”
  8. I filled in ALL fields with the info from the index result page of Stanley M. Elyasz and used that info
  9. Click on Submit

If you filled in ALL fields then you get the result I did in the picture at the top of this article. But you must fill in all fields or it will sit there as if it ignored your request — sadly no error message indicated I needed to fill in ALL fields.

The cost for an email of the document:  $0.00.  Most genealogists have an account to search the online images in the many databases that Family Search has published. But if not, then this Photoduplication Service should give you the impetus to register for an account.

PRICELESS! Thank you Family for providing this valuable service and Selma Blackmon for writing about it.


Returned Image [1-JULY-2014] from Submitted Request:


June 28, 2014

Ancestry and ProQuest Announce Expanded Distribution — #Genealogy, #Library, #Research

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

27-JUNE-2014 — & ProQuest   announced an expanded agreement to deliver  broader array of premier genealogy resources to libraries worldwide. This announcement’s offerings expands the 10 year relationship between the two companies.

This should be good news for libraries around the world.

Read more:


June 22, 2014

Using — Zooming In

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Al Wierzba
Al’s Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog


Al, another Polish genealogy blogger to bookmark [see above for link],  wrote (or more accurately commented on a blog article) and asked,

“I had a question regarding your experience using I’ve stumbled upon an ancestry line that belonged to a parish that has digital copies available online, but I was wondering how do you make the images bigger? The viewer on the website doesn’t allow for the images to magnify sufficiently.”


Let me first say, that the images I am displaying are from a Mac with Safari (I also do the same in MS Windows, Vista with Safari). I cannot test each browser + operating system combination, but I suspect it may be an MS Windows + Java + Security issue on your part,  but let me go step-by-step and perhaps it will work for you too. If not, I would try another browser (Mozilla, Chrome are two other good choices).

Let me choose from one of the new Kielce parishes, I have written about as an example.

Steps …

Small_1 Go to [click on preceding link to go there. You will see the following:



Click on the ‘X’ in the upper right corner [see red arrow and red circle above].  You will now see:

SzukajWArchiwach_ArchivesClick on ‘Archives’ button [see red arrow and red circle above].  You will now see:



Click on ‘Archiwum Panstwowe w Kielcach’ to follow along with my example. Or you can select the actual archive that has the parish and images you wish to work on. For those who clicked on ‘Kielcach’ you will see a screen with ‘Archiwum Panstwowe w Kielcach’ in big bold text near the top of your window.

Click on ‘Resources’ button. Now you will see 9 rows of various parishes from Brzegach to Łukowej. Click on the top one for Brzegach which is numbered as:  21/1700/0     NOTE:  you can click on Number or Name field (Brzegach).

You will see a screen with the Roman Catholic parish Brzegach,  ‘Units 193/193’ and some year ranges and that the records are in Polish, Russian and Latin. Click on ‘Units 193/193’. If you are still with me you will see a list of rows. I am going to click on the 2nd row:  ’21/1700/0/-/2‘ or [Akta urodzeń, małżeństw i zgonów]‘.

Small_2Now we get to a screen that indicates that there are ‘Digital copies [10]’ and a series of boxes describing the year 1810 which is in the language of Polish. Click on ‘Digital copies [10]‘ . At this point if you followed my directions you should see:



Please click on the fifth scanned image [see the red arrow and box above]. This will get us to point where Al’s question is concerned with. You should now see the image:


The above scanned image shows popped up window that is a scaled down image that Al want’s to work with [hypothetically speaking, as I do not know which real image(s) Al was referring to]. It has four black ovals surrounding the tiny  version of the scanned image that we want to work with. If you were to click on the ‘X’ it would close the popped up image and take you back to the previous window with 10 thumbnail images. Do not click on the ‘X’. Also do not click on the ‘Z’. The ‘Z’ just gives you a zoomed in square that magnifies the image area beneath it, after some delay it will appear and you can drag that around the image to see closer what was written — this is not what you want, but maybe it will meet your needs.

If you click the black circle [see red arrow and oval above] with the rectangle and four tiny arrows coming out of the rectangle’s corners — this “icon” is implying it will zoom in on the document. Please click on that icon and you should see:



In the above image you should see a portion of the full page at full-size (1:1), unfortunately if is the upper left corner where no text is displayed. You will also see two miniature windows.  There is a window titled, ‘Tools’ and another window with the title, ‘Preview’.  I dragged both of these windows to the top to get them as much as possible off the full size image.

The ‘Tools’ will allow you to change the contrast (the top tool), the brightness (the middle tool) and the zoom (the bottom tool).  The zoom tool is what you really want to use to see the scanned image at zoom level that is comfortable for you to read the text. I sometimes press this ‘+’ to zoom-in 5 or 6 times. Regrettably the ‘1:1’ does not update to show the zoom level, but the full size image gets larger and of course you are looking at a smaller field of view when you zoom in so you will see less of the document, but at a size you can read.  In this example I found a zoom-in of clicking twice on the ‘+’ was sufficient to read the document which is indeed in Polish. Now you can read:

Roku Tysiąc …  [of course the handwriting is a bit difficult, but trust me that is what the first two words say]. Since we clicked on ‘1810’ year, then we would expect this image to say, “In the year 1000 800 ten …” [Roku Tysiąc Osmset Dziesiątego …]

I cannot show you the relative difference in zoom level as I have to scale the image down so it fits on this blog page in HTML and perhaps is scaled differently still on your mobile device. SO I won’t waste your time trying to show the relative zoom-levels which I cannot really do accurately anyway given all of the many ways this blog is presented to you [my many readers].

Let me come back to the second tool which is also very useful. The tool window titled, ‘Preview’ has a tiny gray rectangle in it that is transparent so you can see a thumbnail of the scanned image underneath the transparent gray rectangle. You can drag this rectangle around the preview window and it will move/navigate the full size window to the area you want to read. I find this easier to navigate the full size window so I use it a lot. You can of course click-drag on the full-size window and drag the viewable area around to the portion of the document that you are trying to read. Either way works for me and I use both depending on whether I am doing a big movement (I use ‘Preview’) or for a small adjustment, I use the click-drag on the full size image. Whatever way you find easier to work for you is the way you should work. But there are those two ways to navigate the image. If you prefer, ‘position’ instead of the word navigate. Then you are positioning the scanned image inside the viewable area for that portion of the document that you are trying to read at the current zoom level you are working with.

In practice I do not change the brightness or contrast tools, just the zoom tool to get a comfortable zoom-level for these aged eyes of mine to read the handwriting. Different documents or years will be scanned such that you need differing zoom levels. In practice I zoom in from 2 to 7 ‘+’ levels and I have not yet had to zoom out (i.e. the ‘-‘). Your eyes may differ.


I hope that answers your question, Al. If not just email me back (click on the jester picture) and I’ll email you personally. Keep in mind that some OS’s do not have java installed or their security is set such that it won’t run as Java had its share of security issues for a while. Every person will need to make those changes on their laptop and/or browser themselves. I just wanted to throw that out as that may be what is going on in your case. Possibly you may not have waited long enough if you clicked on the ‘Z’ in the black oval to provide the magnifying glass rectangle which on my laptop takes a few seconds before it starts to work [it is not instantaneous]. If you clicked on something else before the magnifying glass appeared it might appear to you that it was ‘not zooming’ when in reality it was canceling the magnifying glass because you clicked elsewhere on the web app in your browser.


Thanks for the question, I enjoyed it and I enjoy reading your blog too. Alas, Stanczyk does not have any ancestors in the Milwaukee area, but if you do, then see Al’s blog — its a good one.


May 27, 2014

Pieszczochowicz — An Affiliated Family to LESZCZYŃSKI — #Genealogy, #Polish, #SNA

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Pieszczochowicz – 20 people in Poland

Stanczyk is working out a rather difficult piece of analysis. This jester uses Social Network Analysis (#SNA)  to assert a familial relationship or connection. It is labor intensive / data intensive process. Prior analyses have been very excellent at predicting valuable lines of research that have led to many further finds.

The tool for mapping names (shown in the image above) — shows that Pieszczochowicz is a rather rare name and only exists for some 20 people. The locales, I cannot draw conclusions from, but the numbers say that most if not all PIESZCZOCHOWICZ are closely related by its scarcity. So the name Pieszczochowicz enters my family tree in the following way:

Leon Pieszczochowicz (b. 7-NOV-1865 in Górek, Strożyska, Kielce Gubernia, Poland), son of Konstanty Pieszczochowicz & Maryanna Rzepała. Leon married Jozefa Leszczyńska (b. about 1861 in Biechów, Kielce Gubernia, Poland), daughter of Tomasz Leszczyński & Julianna Kordos. I am sur ethey many children, but I only know of one child: Edward Pieszczochowicz. Now, Edward, comes to the USA from his father Leon in 1910 (who was living in Busko) to his uncle Jan Pieszczochowicz in West Seneca, NJ. Edward, continues onto to Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. He will move on to Lackawanna, Erie County, NY in later life. But while in Toledo, he becomes the God Father of my own uncle: Stephen Edward Eliasz (son of Joseph Eliasz & Waleriya Leszczynska) at St Anthony’s Church on Nebraska Ave.  in Toledo, OH in 1916. Edward Pieszczochowicz’s own God Parents were: Wladyslaw Fras (husband of Agnieszka Leszczynska)  & Antonina Leszczyńska (probably nee Sieradzka, married to Jan Leszczyński). So what we see from this one affiliated family is what I considered a very highly connected value to my LESZCZYNSKi research and even so far as to connect my own ELIASZ line as well. We also see the FRAS (aka FRASS) affiliated family and the I believe the SIERADZKI affiliated family.

When I first captured Edward Pieszczochowicz at the birth/baptism of my uncle Steve, I had no idea who Edward was and had thought him a family friend [not a family member]. So you see over the span of time the collected data and SNA analysis of other data can connect disparate data points and prove  out relativity.

Let me end today’s blog article, by returning to the fact that since PIESZCZOCHOWICZ is rather rare, that I am now seeking out Jan Pieszczochowicz and two others: Boleslaw & Stanley Pieszczochowicz (these two also show up in Toledo, OH at  3224 Maple Street).  Will this family lead me to my LESZCZYNSKI roots? Time will tell.


May 24, 2014

Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie (an update) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Kielce, #Gubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Last year (December 13th, 2013), Stanczyk wrote about an “Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie “(or old Kielce Gubernia) Parish Books. It was produced from a Polish website: . That was before I could go through its collected data. It appears some of their info was inaccurate / misleading about whether there was an online database at the links they mentioned. It was certainly before was loaded with some regional Polish Archives data and it lacked any mention of the Polish Archives themselves: .


Today’s blog is a three page posting, or rather a re-posting of a Facebook posting I made in Polish Genealogy Facebook page. This is just the GenBaza data for old Gubernia: Kielce/Kieleckie. This is a long read — hence the read “More …” breaks.

read more »

May 22, 2014

Genealogy Websites Mash-up — #Genealogy, #Military, #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

About two years ago Stanczyk wrote about a website, special because it was a Polish-German joint effort at Reconciliation.  The website I am referring to is: — Which takes you to a database search page where you can search for, “Victims of Oppression“.  It for searching for victims of World War II inside Poland.  Originally, I kind of ignored it because I did not have family who was sent to  a  Concentration Camp nor did any of mine get forced relation after the war. So I  MISTAKENLY thought this database was not for me. Last week I learned a few things.

Today’s blog is about the Mash-up of  Geneteka database,  Using (the above database of oppression) and a website of Concentration Camps, with a smidgeon of thrown in for good measure.

Here is my Mash-Up … I went to (use above link, for Polish) or paste the above link into Google’s Translator (for English). I put ‘Elijasz’ into the field named “Nazwisko” (Surname) and clicked on the button “Szukaj” (Search). It returned four results for me:

Straty Results - Four Elijasz

Notice the third row, with Stanislaw Elijasz, whose “Miejsce urodzenie” (birth place) was Pacanów. When I clicked on the button with the number “3”.  Remember his birthdate: 1906-04-17 ; We will use this data in Geneteka to get the Akt # and in to get the image of the birth record. When I clicked on the number “3” button, I got a lot more info:

Straty Details Stanislaw Elijasz

I immediately, understood my mistake. The oppression database returned data about my ancestor, Stanislaw Elijasz who was a soldier in the Polish Army when World War II started (1-SEP-1939). He is listed as a victim of the September 1939 Campaign, he was caught, in “Russland” [I presume they mean in the Russian Occupied territory as opposed to the German Occupied Poland.], he was the equivalent of a Lance Corporal in a Signal Corps Battalion. At any rate, he was interred in POW Camp (the 1st of three) on September 17, 1939. Imagine that, he spent the entire World War II as a prisoner of war.

The other details were vague and not clear to me from the data. Lucky for me in Facebook, I have a friend, named Jozef Taran (in Poland). He provided me a website for concentration camps:


This second mash-up link was website of German Stalags (Concentration Camps) in Poland, Ukraine and Western Russia. This website and wikipedia pages gave me the details to understand the data returned by  for Stanislaw. You World War II  military buffs take note !

Ok, but now I wanted to find which Stanislaw Elijasz of Pacanow, born on or about 17-APRIL-1906 was this data about. So I went to: — to see if Stanislaw was indexed and what his birth record number (Akt #) might be to help me in my search of and to confirm the birth date. I found on result number 46,  a result for Stanislaw born in 1906 Pacanow with an Akt # 77. Now I had enough info to locate his birth record in:

Small_4  — That link takes you directly to Stanislaw Elijasz, born in Pacanow on 17-April_1906, Akt #77 [assuming you have a GenBaza login id and you are logged in]. This gives the the church birth record image:


Now we have a complete picture of our Polish ancestor by the mash-up of websites:

April 20, 2014

Genealogy Indexer – Logan Kleinwak — #Genealogy, #Historical, #Directories

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Recently, while Stanczyk was on Twitter, I saw that  Logan Kleinwak (Genealogy Indexer / @gindexer) was again busy,  very busy.  Perhaps you do not remember that his website: , publishes Historical Directories, Yizkor Books, Military Lists, etc.


What I noticed besides he was very busy indexing things and putting them online for searches is two things:

  1. In my 1st thought I noticed, “Collections” (each a menu to a page of resource links)
  2. My 2nd thought was Logan added a Latin-to-Cyrillic feature

I do not mention his excellent little piece of code to implement a keyboard for implementing whatever language’s special characters that are a might difficult to type on American keyboards. That I posted about before.

The Collection  I searched was “Directories”  and I saw:

Obviously this is the Gubernia of my paternal ancestors. So I was excited and I knew it was in Russian (i.e. Cyrillic characters) — a challenge.  AH, … now we see the need for the 2nd thoughtful feature, ‘Add Latin->Cyrillic’. This feature automatically adds the equivalent Cyrillic characters to the Latin characters you are searching for, in order to locate the equivalent, transliterated string in the Russian Directories. That is well thought out! Indeed Genius!

So my thanks to Logan for his fine piece of programming and history/genealogy indexing that he has done. If you have not done so, you owe it to yourself and your research to check out Genealogy Indexer. Add it to your social network (Facebook and Twitter) and bookmark the website in your browser.



Related Blog Articles …

03-May-2012 — Genealogy Indexer – Logan Kleinwak 

28 Feb 2012 — Dying for Diacriticals – Beyond ASCII

15 Jun 2011 —  Polish Genealogy – Useful Websites …


April 8, 2014

In Iceland, You Need An App … #Genealogy, #Icelandic

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

was Reading Eastman’s Online Newsletter. Today he informed me that there is an app for “that”.  Now it is becoming a running joke — so I laughed when I read that Icelanders needed an app to know if they were dating a cousin or not (already available for Android and this jester asked about an app for iPhone/iOS  − will update later when a reply is received).

Now this jester has known for some time that if you want to research closed genealogical populations, particularly for DNA, you study the American Amish and you study Iceland. According to the CIA Factbook (for Iceland), there will be a projected population of slightly over 317,000 this July. A common settlement date of 874 C.E. is accepted to be earliest time, but there is new evidence that Iceland may have been settled even a bit earlier than that. Almost everyone dates from the original settlers (Iceland has a very low  immigration population).

In a previous article about this,  back in 2007 (which I see was updated January 2014). The website (online database), which hosts the online registry Íslendingabók (“The Book of Icelanders”). Íslendingabók is the product of a cooperation between Icelandic company deCODE Genetics and Fridrik Skúlason.

Genealogists in Iceland say all Icelanders are descendants of the bishop Jón Arason and according to Arason and his partner, Helga Sigurdardóttir, had at least nine children who were all quite fertile, while many of the other members of the then 65,000 population weren’t. So experts argue all Icelanders alive today probably derive from the good bishop. On the website of the University in Iceland this argument is supported by their mathematical formula.



December 4, 2013

Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie Parish Books

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Wordless Wednesday …


September 7, 2013

Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Stanczyk

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

05September2013_FSFamily Search has updated their Polish Collection & Czech Census too on September 4th & 5th.

Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966;

Poland, Lublin  Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 was also updated:

Also Czech Republic Censuses 1843-1921:

Add  Family Search Wiki Page if your genealogy research area is Poland:

Images and indexes of church books containing baptisms and births, marriages, burials and deaths for the parishes in the Radom & Lublin Roman Catholic Dioceses of Poland.

Births end in 1912,

Marriages end in 1937, and

Deaths end in 1982    due to Polish privacy rules.

August 22, 2013

#Meme — Things I Find Whilst Looking Up Other Things — #Genealogy, #Art, #GettyMuseum

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


The Getty Museum released on 14th-August-2013 over 4,000 images into public domain (i.e. free). According to the ArtObserved article on the museum’s  public release made public on their Getty Iris blog, this is part of their, “Open Content” commitment of their digital resources.

You can search these images using:  Getty Search Gateway .

Stanczyk, knows what you’re thinking, “I am too busy on my genealogy to search through museum images”. But I politely urge you to reconsider. While I was searching their images, I found a genealogical family tree, of Duke Ludwig I of Brzeg (amongst many other images he commissioned). A Polish noble of house Piast. So if your family tree intersects, get thee to the Getty Museum. For those curious, I have posted the images to this blog. The text is Fraktur looking, gothic, German script.



Other Duke Ludwik I, Family Tree Images …

DukeLudiwg_I_02 DukeLudiwg_I_03

August 12, 2013

Oracle 12c – Multi-Tenant Databases — #STEM, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Oracle 12c

Oracle’s newest database (version 12c) has many new features, the discussion of which are too big for a single blog article (or even a series of blogs). The substantial high-level bulleted list of new features is in the 12c New Features Manual . But the concepts and low level SQL language details show a much larger change then you might perceive.

Multitenant Database

The new paradigm shift, Multitenant Databases, will stop DBAs pretty quick, particularly in Windows where the installer creates a Container DB. Previous to 12c, all databases were Non-Container DBs. With 12c you can create a Non-Container DB or a Container DB. The Container DB can have zero, one, or more Pluggable DBs within. A Non-Container DB can never have a Pluggable DB. So that becomes an upfront database creation decision.

You can and you should read the Oracle Intro to Multitenant Databases .

I first relaized the Oracle Installer had created a container database for me when I went through the normal process of creating a database user using the same old techniques I always did and received an Oracle Error: ORA-65096. WHAM, I slammed right into the new paradigm without me even knowing it existed. The error description and the necessary action introduced to another part of the Multitenant Database paradigm: Comon User vs. Local User. That quickly led to Containers. Of course, with any new features, comes an array of new database schema tables like, v$pdbs for example. You will also probably use a new Sql*Plus command a LOT: SHOW CON_NAME to know what container (root or pluggable database) you are connected to. Some DBA commands must be done in the root container (CDB$ROOT). Your pluggable databases (in Windows) will be by default: PDB$SEED and PDBORCL. Every container database has precisely one seed pluggable database from which all pluggable databases are created from.

This paradigm shift will be  seriously disorienting feeling to long time DBAs, especially if were not aware this was coming. Fortunately, there are many DBA bloggers out there sharing their 12c experiences. They were a help for me to gather the necessary jargon. But it was not until I discovered that Oracle had created a tutorial on Multitenant Databases and I had spent an hour or two playing with the tutorial on my newly created sandbox database (on Windows) which was by default a Container DB. This tutorial is an excellent way to jump start your understanding of the new paradigm.

By the way, I think either the default should be a NON-CONTAINER DB (so you are backwards compatible) or the Oracle Intsaller needs to make it clear that a CONTAINER DB will require new DBA processes (i.e. a learning curve) and give you an OVERT option to create a NON-CONTAINER DB for backwards compatibility.


Read the Oracle Introduction to Multitenant Databases to understand the concepts. Then immediately work your way through the tutorial in a test database that is a Container DB. Ultimately, I think Container DBs are the way to go. I think this is what you want to do to implement a CLOUD or in a Virtualized Environment.

August 11, 2013

Pacanów Pomoc – #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy this past week with Oracle 12c (database) !   So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my genealogy.

I have analyzed the data from GENEALODZY.PL in their GENESZUKACZ database for Pacanów Births (1875-1908). So now I need some help (pomoc). In my notes column I have noted the ELIASZ that I have in my family  -or- my guess. The empty notes fields are ELIASZ that I need help with. If you are a genealogist with these people in your family tree then please email me your info and if possible any images of church records or family photos.



/ Rok


/ Akt

Imię Nazwisko    NOTES
1 1875 110  Wacław Eliasz in my tree; son of Wojciech Eliasz & Agnieszka Pyszkow; [image]
2 1876 109  Marianna Eliasz daughter of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
3 1878 59  Katarzyna Eliasz
4 1879 20  Roman Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
5 1880 52  Jan Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
6 1880 160  Jan Eliasz My grand-uncle Jan; son of Jozef Eliasz & Marianna Paluch
7 1881 28  Jan Eliasz Martin Eliasz’s  (& Julianna Odomski) son
8 1881 30  Julianna Eliasz
9 1881 130  Tomasz Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
10 1882 128  Wincenty Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
11 1882 157  Marianna Eliasz Martin’s  (Julianna Odomski) daughter
12 1882 185  Katarzyna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
13 1883 25  Roman Eliasz
14 1884 33  Apolonia Eliasz Martin’s daughter
15 1884 71  Marianna Eliasz
16 1885 46  Józef Eliasz My Grandfather; Have Birth Record
17 1885 125  Marianna Eliasz
18 1886 189  Jan Eliasz
19 1886 238  Szczepan Eliasz
20 1888 104  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
21 1888 123  Teofila Eliasz
22 1889 71  Józefa Eliasz
23 1889 109  Antoni Eliasz ??possibly son of Ludwik & Elzbieta  M.
24 1890 24  Katarzyna Eliasz
25 1890 149  Marianna Eliasz
26 1890 181  Stanisław Eliasz Martin’s son, dies in Detroit (Stanislaw Elyasz in October 1923)
27 1891 186  Stanisław Eliasz
28 1891 190  Franciszka Eliasz
29 1892 68  Wincenty Eliasz
30 1892 83  Władysław Eliasz My Grand-Uncle
31 1892 206  Marianna Eliasz
32 1893 143  Anna Eliasz
33 1893 237  Marianna Eliasz
34 1893 261  Agnieszka Eliasz ??? Agnieszka Marianna E. that marries S. Hajek (Cleveland) ???
35 1895 30  Marianna Eliasz
36 1895 230  Tomasz Eliasz My Grand-Uncle (Dorota’s grandfather); Have birth record
37 1896 164  Wacław Eliasz
38 1897 8  Julianna Eliasz
39 1897 236  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
40 1898 103  Anna Eliasz
41 1899 63  Balbina Eliasz
42 1899 79  Zygmunt Eliasz ??? Zygmunt Elijasz son Jozef E. & Theresa Siwiec??? PROBABLY not since Zygmunt was born in Biechow in 1898 (April 19)
43 1899 185  Aleksander Eliasz
44 1900 163  Julianna Eliasz
45 1901 84  Marcin Eliasz
46 1901 100  Anna Eliasz
47 1901 161  Marianna Eliasz
48 1901 164  Martin Eliasz
49 1903 95  Stanisława Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
50 1903 112  Helena Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
51 1903 175  Janina Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
52 1905 96  Julianna Eliasz
53 1906 71  Wojciech Eliasz
54 1906 77  Stanisław Eliasz
55 1906 141  Edward,Jan Eliasz son of Jan Eliasz  & Pelagia z Kedzierski ?
56 1907 11  Julian Eliasz
57 1908 67  Kazimiera Eliasz
58 1908 124  Michalina Eliasz
August 8, 2013

Wordless Wednesday — #Oracle, #12c, #STEM, #GEEK

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle 12c installed . Getting my #GEEK on this week.



August 7, 2013

Oracle v 12c … vs. Greenplum MPP — #STEM, #Oracle, #Greenplum, #BigData

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Studying up on Oracle v. 12c. As usual, there are many new features to recommend migrating or deploying to the new version of Oracle. Last blog, I talked about just a few: ILM, ADO, HEAT_MAP and how these buzz-worthy acronyms were related to compression inside the database. Before,  I get into today’s topic, I wanted to talk about  a bit more about the Automatic Data Optimization (ADO).

I failed to make clear yesterday, that the ADO, automatically relocates your cold data or compresses your data as it ages through its Lifecycle automatically. That is the magic. You define the policies and the database will relocate or compress a segment(s) or a row(s) to save space or to clear space on more expensive hard disk, by relocating to slower/less accessible disk storage media. Pretty nifty idea.

By the way, you may be wondering … 8i, 9i, 10g, 11g, 12c what is the pattern or meaning of these major release versions from Oracle.?  Well, “8i / 9i” were from the era, when Oracle was the “Internet” database (you know  like iPhone, or i-<Anything>). Then “10g / 11g” were to be the “Grid”. Grid never really achieved buzz-worthy status. Now we have “12c”. It should not surprise you that we are now in the “Cloud” era. So Oracle’s letters are for: Internet, Grid, and Cloud . Now you know.

That Cloud and yesterday’s ADO  will figure in today’s blog too. You see, I was recently asked about Greenplum. Could I use it? As is my wont, I took a step back and studied the question. Here is my answer.



MPP platform

MPP – RAC(aka Oracle parallel server)

Full SQL (Postgres)

Full SQL (Oracle, ANSI)


Compression since 11g, ADO/ILM 12c

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes


JDBC/ODBC/OLE/Pro*C (etc.)

Parallel Query Optimizer

Parallel Query Optimizer

External Tables

External Tables

GreenPlum HD (HDFS)

External Tables using an HDFS

I believe that as an Oracle expert (28+ years from v2.0-11g inclusive), that I could effectively use Greenplum on a project. If you look at the above chart, I think you will see what I am about to explain.

Green is an MPP platform. Very nice acrhitecture. Oracle can sit on top of any architecture (MPP, SMP, or any cluster or Highly Available or Fault-Tolerant Failover set of servers) you can setup.

Both use FULL SQL.  That means ANSI compliance and with enhancements (POSTGRES for Greenplum and ORACLE, uh, for Oracle).

B-Tree and Bit Map Indexes for both — yawn old hat. Parallel Query Optimizer – been there, seen that for a while.

Greenplum has JDBC/ODBC/OLE interfaces. Oracle has those too, plus a full complement of Pro*C (or many other languages) embedded pre-compiled 3GL languages. Oracle is well supported by Shell Scripts like PHP or PERL that have their interfaces to Oracle. Slight advantage to Oracle. But the point is, Oracle professionals have done this for more than a decade.

External Tables too are a feature in both databases.  GreenPlum HD uses the External Table to provide HDFS access in GreenPlum via SQL or other in-database features. Now I had not previously thought to try and use HDFS with Oracle. But the External Table is precisely the feature I would use. Can it be done? A look at Oracle’s documentation answers that:


CREATE TABLE [schema.]table
   ( column datatype, ... )
                        DEFAULT DIRECTORY directory
                        ACCESS PARAMETERS
                            ( PREPROCESSOR HDFS_BIN_PATH:hdfs_stream access_parameters
                        ... )
                        LOCATION (file1,file2...)

So I recommend that companies fell free to utilize Oracle consultants on Greenplum databases. There is an awful lot of overlap that the Oracle specialist can leverage from his/her background and transfer to the Greenplum database.

Of course, for companies without Greenplum, it looks like you can use many of the same features already in Oracle including using HDFS filesystems with External Tables.

So get to that BigData, your friendly Oracle expert can help you.

July 28, 2013

FamilySearch.Org — #Genealogy, #STEM, #Database

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 22 Jul 2013 — FamilySearch.Org  New Database

FamilySearch.Org has some new databases (don’t they always — they are amazing). One in particular caught this jester’s eyes.

United States, National Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel Files, 1954-1970,

By training and long years in the field, Stanczyk is a STEM worker. So I was drawn to this database. But who did I know had a degree and was a professional in 1954-1970 ? How about one of my favorite authors … in a register of Science / Technical professional? Well, yes — if you thought of  Isaac Asimov .

So what data is in this database …

If click on the link, then query on Isaac Asimov, you will see:


July 14, 2013

A Bit of Blog Bigos … #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy since the 4th of July! So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my blog.

bigos_huntersstewA bit of bigos (recipe) !!

Let me point out that in June the Polish Archive completed their latest update on: ♥ .

Unfortunately, it did not include anything from the old wojewodztwo: Kielce (now in SwietoKrzyskie). See the image of the drop down menu below (not full listing but to give you an idea on what is in and how that is somewhat limited for researchers like Stanczyk. I hope another phase will commence soon!



Meanwhile on:

♥ – They added the death records from 1875-1908 for Pacanow parish to their Geneszukach database. Previously they had added the Birth and Marriage records. These are transcription / indexes, not actual church record images such as you find in their Metryki database.

Still I have found dozens of Eliasz (and … Gawlik, Gronek, Hajek, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Major, Paluch, Wlecial, Zasucha, etc.) that I was previously unaware of. Now I will need to get the actual images in order to make sense of these indexes and the new people in order to add them to the family tree.

Enjoy the bigos. Smaczne (delicious)!

June 2, 2013

Polish Vital Records On-line — A Survey #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Stanczyk is a bit uncertain. It seems like every day there are some new vital records indexes or even actual register scans themselves made available from congregations all over the Central European — Jewish, Catholic (Roman & Greek), Orthodox, Lutheran/Evangelical lands that make up Poland or a land that was once within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the 1st Republic) or any of the variations between those times. So I thought I would step back and take stock of what was available. Yes, I know this will be out of date by tomorrow. But here is a quick & dirty, handy reference list of where to go looking. Clip & Save.

Cut— — — — — — — — — —

Poland – Archives & Genealogical Societies

AGAD Księgi metrykalne – Eastern Borderlands (Ukraine, Russia Jewish Pale, etc.) —

(scans by Sygn.: )

Prussian Poland Parishes

BASIA – – State Archives in Poznan, the Wielkopolska Genealogical Society (WTG “Gniazdo”) project.

Poznan Marriage Project –

Pomorskie Towarzstwo Genealogiczne –

All Poland & Eastern Borders (PTG)

GeneSzukacz  / Geneteka (indexes, some scans) –      &

METRYKI (parish register scans)–

Szukajwarchiwach (Poland’s National Archives online) –

This is the latest project and is shooting to have 5.8 Million records by the end June (this month) scanned and on-line by Polish Archive or National Museum.

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) –

The venerable project with new life provides indexes to registered users (free) and then you can purchase the actual church record. Great for Jewish Pale & Russian Poland, plus so much more. –,list,4,1 (AP GRODZISK). Archive in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Russian Poland parishes near Warsaw).

Family Search.Org 

Besides the 5 parishes below, you might want to have a look at holdings for:

Austria, Germany, Russia & Ukraine

Poland, Częstochowa Roman Catholic Church Books, 1873-1948 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Gliwice Roman Catholic Church Books, 1599-1976 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Lublin Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 99,510 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 18,916 21 Apr 2013
Poland, Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books, 1612-1900 1,002,155 6 Jan 2012

Did I miss any? Email Me … Proszę !

Other (Inne) – from Valerie Warunek (PGSM). Database of Indexed church records (birth/urodzenia, marriage/malzenstwa,  death/zgony) from Lubelskie wojewodztwo. No scans (skans), but it does have record (akt) #’s.

May 21, 2013

Pacanow 1875-1908 Index

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St. Martin -  Pacanow Church about 1918

St. Martin – Pacanow Church about 1918

Stanczyk, has been sifting through the Index created on in their Geneszukacz database. Alright, only the Births Index, so far.

I see they have a total of nearly 7,300 people from those years (1875-1908) in their Birth Index. From Adam … Żyp . There were 58 ELIASZ in their index.Notice they used ELIASZ and not ELIJASZ. I found that interesting. They removed ‘J’ when they produced the index. Was that an error? Or was the indexer an expert? Because, in my heart of hearts, I believe the name (at least back to 1690) was ELIASZ.

It was only since 1869 when the Russian Empire forced Poland to keep records in Russian (Cyrillic) that the ‘J’ appeared from the Russian character ‘я’ (Ya) that ELIASZ became элияшъ .  элияшъ is transliterated in a Latin alphabet as ‘Elijasz’.

I only wanted to mention this as while I believe the translated properly produced the index with respect to ELIASZ; You will need to realize that finding the record in Russian/Cyrillic, you will need to look for a different translation (i.e. ELIJASZ/элияшъ) in the indexes and the actual church records.

So now I have an index of ELIASZ born in Pacanow in the years 1875-1908. Now what? I compared the list of 58 with what I already had/knew. I saw an overlap of 22 people. So I have 36 new ELIASZ to resolve and add into the family tree. My options are:

  1. Write to Pacanow parish and request specific records (since I have year, Akt#),  
  2. Write to Polish National Archive (again with detailed info),
  3. Hire a genealogist in Poland,
  4. Go on a genealogical tour to Poland.

The year range 1875-1908 is not completely in LDS microfilm. Although 1875-1884 is in LDS MF #’s:

1192351 Item 10,    1192352 Items 1-2,   1807621 Items 8-11,    1807622 Items 1-3

So doing research in a local Family History Center or at the Family History Library (Salt Lake) is not an option for the remaining 36. So I now have better options for remote research.

My List of 58 ELIASZ.

May 19, 2013 – Geneszukacz Database, Pacanow 1875-1908 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Pacanow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealodzy_plOn  Stanczyk  saw that they have an updated GENESZUKACZ database.

My ancestral village, PACANOW, was indexed for BIRTHS (1875-1908). I was able to verify it was correct with my grandfather (whose Birth Record I have) and a few others. I also found some I did not know about !!!   I only wish they had the images (like in METRYKI database). Thank you: Wojciech Liśkiewicz (who I think was the indexer)!

Later in the day they(he) also added MARRIAGES(1875-1908) too.



See Also:

Domagala, Hajek, Kedzierski, Odomski, Paluch, Poniewierski, Siwiec, Wlecial, Wojtys, Zasucha, Zdziebko, Zwolski

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