Posts tagged ‘Polish’

April 29, 2017

Dziennik Polski (Detroit) — #Newspapers #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been very busy! A long overdue update to my Rootsweb page on Dziennik Polski has been done … more to come!

Also this jester has added 6,000 names to the Complete Index (nearly 42,000 Poles) including adding names (& relationships to deceased) listed on the Funeral Cards. The One-Step db app based on this data needs to be re-done. 

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April 21, 2017

A Little Bit of Blog Bigos … — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This blog post became necessary because blog topics overran my ability to write blog posts … so here is a bit of Bigos (a mishmash) / hunter’s hodge-podge of blog topics in minature, some of which foreshadow a larger blog post (or two).

Ancestry.appAncestry released version 8.2. Security & some bugs were addressed … but the big news is image/record viewer! For a long time I despaired over the inability of the smartphone app to display the images at full resolution necessary for detailed analysis. So Stanczyk tried the image at top that this jester received from third-cousin that became a seminal document for both of us genealogists! Wow! The image viewer was great! 

In fact, I noticed a detail in the record as I was trying to detail the church record’s Polish for our shared ancestors. The image notes are below … (see Church Marriage Register)
One of the witnesses was a JAN ZASUCHA. It just so happened that I had an unfinished blog piece from mid December 2016 that was languishing in draft mode. It was upon Zasucha and how this affiliated family was related to me because my second-great-grandmother was Anna Zasucha.  So here was another example that 100 years ago the Pacanów families in America were very close and related at some level to my Eliasz/Elijasz/Elyasz/etc. family. I will finish that blog. I am hoping there is a 3rd/4th cousin in Poland with images or info about Anna Zasucha. [Editor’s Note – published Zasucha article on 20-April-2017; URL:  https://mikeeliasz.wordpress.com/2016/12/12/searchin-for-zasucha-genealogy-polish/  ]

Jennifer Holik
I also have a new blog post in progress about a new Ancestry database that was brought to my attention by Chicago genealogist, Jennifer Holik. She is an expert on Military (especially WWII) genealogy records. So she had a brief piece on US Army funerial Transport ships and I noticed the database had WWI Transports and I wondered if some Haller’s Army troops were transported via that. (Spoiler alert … yes!).


Church Marriage Register – Roza Wleciałowski & Adam Gawlikowski

Adam Gawlikowski – kawaler, 27, syn Marcina i Maryanny Lisów z Opatowiec, Kieleckie

Rozalia Wleciałowska – panna, 20, corka Maciej i Kat.  Eliasz z Pacanowa – Kiel.

sw. Marcoli Dusza, Jan Zasucha

<margin>

4)

sl. 19/8

o 9ty

Klęczu z.

— — — transcription above / translation below

Adam Gawlikowski – bachelor, age 27, son of  Marcin (Gawlikowski) & Maryanna z. Lisów of Opatowiec in Kieleckie (Gubernia of Russian-Poland)

Rozalia Wleciałowska – maiden, age 20, daughter of Maciej (Wleciałowski) & Katarzyna Eliasz of Pacanow in Kieleckie (Gubernia of Russian-Poland)

witnesses Marcoli (spelling uncertain) Dusza, Jan Zasucha

(marginalia)

Marriage #4 (of 1912) at Sweetest Heart of Mary, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan

Marriage August 19th

9pm (time)

kneeling

March 18, 2017

Stanley Babiarz from Pacanów — #Birth

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Akt#50 (lower left corner of church register image):

For Elizabeth E. (on ancestry).

Akt#50

Record Date: 21-March-1885   Parish: Pacanów

Father: Józef Babiarz of Rataje, age 30

Witnesses:  Walenty Madej, age 26,  Walenty Czapliak age 46

Birth Date: today? (21-March-1885)

Mother: Marianna (née) Smystek age 25

Baby: Stanisław

god parents: Józef Plakta(sp?) & Salomeja Wybraniowa

May 31, 2015

Meet Private Wojtek, the Nazi fighting Bear-Soldier — #Polish #History #WWII

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Private Wojtek

Private Wojtek

 

This article from thechive.com has pictures and personal anecdotes that this jester has not seen before and I recommend you read this uplifting story (and my two stories for a complete picture of this hero-bear)!

Meet Private Wojtek, the Nazi fighting bear-soldier

Twice before has Stanczyk written about Private Wojtek, the Polish Army Bear:

 


May 10, 2015

Letter From Olivier – #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Olivier, first thanks for reading/writing the blog …

I’ve been reading your genealogy blog for a year now and I’ve found some nice infomration from and a lot of good humour as well, thank you and good job.
I trying to research my in-law’s side of the family. They come from Lomza and Grajewo region of Poland, I believe it is the Podlaskie District. The names are Bruszkiewicz and Jurkowski, and Trepanowski (a cousin).

I registered with GenBaza.pl and genetyka.pl and metryki but it doesn’t look as easy as how you made it look in your blog stories to find available scans. And then when I go to the Polish State Archives, well the short of it is I don’t read Russian (and I don’t read Polish either but I can read indexes, I can’t in Russian) and I don’t know how to spell Bruszkiewicz in Russian. So when I am faced with an index or i’m looking at a page of 4 birth certificates, i don’t even know what I’m looking at.


Then I will need to find help with translations.

Do you have any tips on how to translate a Polish family name into how it would be spelled in Russian? And written by hand in a civil register?

As anyone indexed these parishes?

Any encouragements or tips would be welcomed if possible 🙂 The whole thing feels like a brick wall!

Thank you for any help, and good job on the blog!

Best, Olivier

Ok let me see in what ways I can help you:

  1. First I am self taught in Russian and Polish from books written by William F. Hoffman and Jon Shea. So I’d recommend purchasing & reading their books, “In Their Own Words …” .  Volumes I & II.
  2. Also it is helpful to know Polish and learn the families and village names in Polish as this will help when you learn to read Russian. Translating names back & forth between Polish & Russian is more art than science.  So knowing family names  before tackling helps. Lets try a few names: Eliasz became Elijasz under Russian (1868-1918) in Russian-Poland partition. So I was expecting to see: елиашь  or элиашь but was surprised to see it as: елияшь  or элияшь in Russian/Cyrillic. So learn the Cyrillic “alphabet”  and the sounds of those letters so you can transliterate Polish/English/Latin letters into Russian/Cyrillic.  SteveMorse.org has a good English-to-Russian (and vice-versa) tool at:   http://stevemorse.org/russian/eng2rus.html

So if we try, “Bruszkiewicz”, we get (try the first one, but keep in mind that you are liable to see any below):

Брушзкивич, Брюшзкивич, Бружзкивич, Брюжзкивич, Брушжкивич, Брюшжкивич, Бружжкивич, Брюжжкивич, Брушзкиевич, Брюшзкиевич, Бружзкиевич, Брюжзкиевич, Брушжкиевич, Брюшжкиевич, Бружжкиевич, Брюжжкиевич

  1. You are correct about Lomza/Grajewo current wojewowdztwo. Both appear to be indexed in Geneteka. You can try the website: http://www.ksiegi-parafialne.pl/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=236&Itemid=331
  2. Grajewo is in Szukajwarchiwach (1890-1912): http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/5/525/0/str/1/15?sort=4&ps=True#tabJednostki . Have you read my documentation for using Szukajwarchiwach?
  3. Let’s see what “Bruszkiewicz” looks like in 1890 index in Cyrillic cursive writing: … ok I could not find Bruszkiewicz in a handful of years that I searched in both Grajewo and Lomza. Perhaps you need to verify the locale.
  4. So I went back to Geneteka and found a Bruszkiewicz in the index that I could locate online. I wanted to show you what it looks like in cursive Cyrillic:

Bruszkiewicz

 

February 14, 2015

St. Stanislaus Cemetery — Hamilton, MERCER COUNTY, NJ — #Genealogy #Volunteer

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St_Stanislaus_Cemetery

Stanczyk was taking a road trip last weekend.

I took a page out of Jonathan Shea’s book, “Going Home”. In an Appendix, he lists the Polish Cemeteries across the USA. So in a kind of RAOGK, and as a way to contribute to PGSCT&NE, I started to take pics of tombstones and transcribe the pics for an index.

In a single visit I was able to do about 40% of the cemetery. I of course, am sending my entire contribution to PGSCT&NE. But, two tombstones had pics attached to the tombstone and I admired these two tombstones so much, I also added them to FindAGrave.

#Volunteer genealogists; Its another way to collaborate.


Below is the one from the Maławski family (click to enlarge):

Malawski_Marcin_Stanislawa

Marcin, Stanislawa Malawski

December 23, 2014

Christmas Wish #2014 — #Polish #Genealogy #Tradition

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

XmasWishStanczyk wanted to wish all the best of the Season’s Greeting !

— So today’s blog article is what I wish for us genealogists.

 

Wishes

  1. That bloggers add, “#genealogy” and “#Polish” (or whatever specialty) to their blog titles and/or their body of their blogs, Facebook posts, Twitter tweets. You may have noticed this author adds “#Genealogy” at the end of my blog titles. The reason being is these articles are shared with: Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, & LinkedIn. These hashtags help researchers find our stuff in Google/Bing/Yahoo search engines. I feel the #Polish is vitally important for other genealogy researchers  to find us. Please try and add this to your social posts.
  2. That people join Polish Genealogical Societies.
  3. That people try to perform one act of genealogical kindness or partake in one genealogy project each year. Genealogy is perhaps the one research that benefits most from “crowd-sourcing” or other collaboration.
  4. In Jonathan Shea’s book, Going Home , he lists in Appendix A, Polish Parishes around the USA. Almost every state has one or more. Can we all go around to the nearest local Polish church and photograph and index the names on the tombstones/headstones from the cemeteries with the dates? Email whatever you get to Stanczyk (click on image) and I will see it gets to PGSCT&NE for their project and/or post on the web in this blog or elsewhere as appropriate. This will enable all to find the data via web searches.
  5. That Polish bloggers, journals/e-zines and newspapers cross refer each other to their readers. I know I will do a Polish Newspaper column in January in this blog. Of course, my blog roll refers you readers to other Polish Blogs too.

Does anybody else have any good suggestions for wishes? Email me or Comment on this blog article.

Wesołych Świąt i Szczęśliwego Nowego Roku !


 

 

 

March 7, 2014

Another Alegata Article — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian, #Cyrillic

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19070124_Alegata_Marr_Elijasz_Leszczynski copy

75 kopeks. The cost of that stamp on an alegata. In case, you cannot read Cyrillic or do not recognize it on the cancellation mark of the stamp — it says:

11/24 January 1907

This stamp appeared on an alegata document, describing my paternal grandparents, Jozef Elijasz & Waleryja Leszczynska. You can see from the civil and church records of theirs, that this is their marriage date.

So now I have three Polish  authoritative sources for their marriage (date/place).

I found this alegata a bit fascinating. First it had the stamp. Second it listed my grandfather & his parents, but only my grandmother (without her parents  — fortunately, the other two records listed those parents). Third and most puzzling is the marriage bann dates:

13th, 20th, 27th January [of 1907 implied]. But wait a minute, the date of the alegata is 11/24 January, 1907. That is three days before their marriage date. So this “official document” had listed a future date [of the marriage], I guess giving them permission to marry in the church assuming the 3rd bann was a foregone conclusion. The future date so messed with my mind and comprehension of Russian/Cyrillic that I had to check and recheck the three documents to assure myself I was reading it correctly and that they had used a future date in the alegata!

Oh, the 11/24 January 1907 thing?  That is just the custom of “dual dating”. The earlier date is the Julian date: 11-January-1907, as the Russian calendar was still using the Julian calendar. While the 24-January-1907 is the Gregorian calendar that we use today. Of course you can find liturgical calendars (Russian Orthodox for example) that still use the Julian Calendar for their religious events (i.e. EASTER). Why is it 13 days difference?  They were in the 20th century and another day difference between the two calendars, as compared to the majority of the church records (1868-1900 during when the Russian language  was the defacto language of administration records) in the Russian partition which were 12 days apart.

— — —  Alegata …

read more »

September 23, 2013

Map of Poland 1764 – Polish Coat of Arms By Province — #Polish, #Heraldic, #CoatOfArms

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Polska_1764_pelna

Jozef Taran wrote over the weekend on Facebook about a website giving the coat of arms of the various provinces.

Stanczyk just loves the artistry and historicity of heraldic symbols.  But, it was a bonus! At the site was a 1764 map of the Poland/Lithuanian Commonwealth.

As a double bonus, I looked at the whole website:

http://www.wawrzak.org/news_updates.htm and it is a site dedicated to Szlachta (Polish Nobility). It has Polish/English text. Very nice find for those with blue blood coursing through their genealogical veins.

The 1764 Map is shown on the Maps Page.

August 30, 2013

Gesher Galicia — Tabula Register — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish, #Ukrainian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GesherGaliciaGesher Galicia has really been adding content and also a website redesign of late. I am planning on joining this genealogical society. The reason is their projects and current databases, maps, and variety of resources that can aid all genealogists and especially Jewish Genealogists with family from the former Galicia region (now western part in Poland, eastern part in Ukraine) of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire (aka Hapsburg). So Ukrainian and Polish genealogists take note!

This little tidbit was found because of a PGSCT&NE posting in Twitter/Facebook. So keeping tabs on events in social media (or reading this blog) can keep you informed on the latest contributions by genealogists, the world over. Follow these societies and join them and volunteer your time. I am sure Gesher Galicia members knew about this and active meeting goers may have been informed, but it is now the Internet/Cloud that keeps the vast majority of genealogists informed and involved. Keep up the good work!

The Gesher Galicia website has an article by Alexander Dunai. Alexander also has another, more complete article on his website which you should go read ( http://alexdunai.com/documents/item_11/) on Tabula Registers and their purpose, plus a list of towns is available with this genealogy resource at URL:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/galitzianer/tabula-registers-an-untapped-genealogical-resource-in-the-lviv-archives/

The list of towns from that article with Tabula Registers for the Villages and Towns of Galicia:

 Bandrow  Bania Kotowska  Belz (15 vols)
 Berwinkowa  Bialoberezka  Bialogora
 Bialy Kamien  Blyszczywody (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Bolechow
 Bolehowce  Brody (32 vols, 1794-1884)  Bronica
 Brzegi Dolne  Brzezany (12 vols)  Buda (incl. in Wysoka)
 Busk (5 vols)  Cholojow  Chorocowa
 Chyrow  Czajkowice  Dobra
 Dobrohostow  Dobromyl (16 vols)  Dobrzanica (incl. in Uszkowice)
Dolhopol  Dolina (10 vols)  Dolina area villages (incl. in Lopianka)
 Drohobycz & suburbs (81 vols)  Dunajow vicinity villages
 Dynow (3 books, 1780-1825)
 Engelsbruk  Falkenberg  Falkenstein
 Folwarki Wielke & Folwarki Male  Gaje Starobrodskie  Gerynia (incl. in Witwica)
 Gleboka  Gliniany (8 volumes)  Grodek Jagiellonski (11 volumes 1797-1880)
 Halicz (10 vols. 1753-1886)  Holowy  Hoszow
 Hoszow (incl. in Stankowce)  Hrusatycze (incl. in Strzeliska)  Hubice
 Huczko  Jagielnica  Jaroslaw (50 vols. 1792-1892)
 Jasien  Jasienica  Jasienica Solna
 Jaworow (9 vols. 1792-1893)  Jozefow  Kalusz (7 vols. 1758-1822)
 Kamionka Strumilowa (21 books)  Katyna  Kimirz
 Kniahinin (4 vols. 1801-1885)  Kniazpol  Kobasz
 Kolomyja (30 volumes)  Kolpiec  Komarno
 Korostow  Kotacin  Krakowiec
 Krasnoila  Krechow  Kropiwnik Nowy & Stary
 Krystynopol (7 vols. 1792-1883)  Kulczyce  Kulikow
 Kurowice  Kuty (18 vols, 1781-1888)  Kwaszenina
 Lacke  Liskowate  Liszczyny
 Lisznia  Lopianka  Lodyna
 Lopuszanka  Lopusznica  Lubycza Krolewska
 Makow  Mariampol (3 vols, 1807-1855)  Migowo
 Mizun  Modrycz  Mokrotyn
 Mokrotyn, Smerekow, Przedrzymichy, & Blyszczywody  Muzylowice  Nadziejow (incl. in Lopianka)
 Nahujowice  Nanow  Narajow
 Neudorf (incl. in Bolechowce)  Niedwedza  Nojdorf (incl. in Zawidowice)
 Nowe Miasto (1 volume)  Obersdorf  Olesko (3 vols, 1798-1882)
 Orow  Paprotno  Plebania
 Polana  Potylicz  Powitno
 Prochnik (14 vols, 1814-1874)  Przerzymichy (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Przemysl with suburbs (56 vols, 1799-1894)
 Przemyslany (11 vols, 1816-1881)  Radziechow (2 vols, 1827-1874)  Raniowice
 Rawa Ruska (12 vols, 1796-1882)  Rodatycze  Rogozno
 Rozenburg  Rozen Maly and Rozen Wielki  Roztoki
 Roztoczki (incl. in Witwica)  Rudawka  Rudki (4 vols)
 Rybno with Slobodka  Rybotycze  Rymanow with neighboring villages (6 vols, 1782-1888)
 Sambor & neighboring villages (69 volumes)  Sielec  Smereczna
 Smerekov (incl.  Mokrotyn)  Slobodka  Smolnica
 Smolno  Sniatyn (vols, 1791-1832)  Sokal (vols. with index)
 Solec  Sopotnik  Stainfeld
 Stanila with Stebnik and Kolpets  Stanislawow & suburbs (99 vols. 1784-1882)  Stankowce with Hoszow
 Stare Miasto  Stary Sambor  Starzawa Sanocka
 Stebne with Dolhopol  Stebnik  Strzeliska Nowe and Stare
 Sulukow (incl.  Lopianka)  Szmankowce  Tarnawa
 Tartakow (1 vol. 1817-1883)  Tarnopol city (50 vols.).  Trebowla (12 vols. 1803-1886)
 Truskawiec (incl. Tustanowice)  Tudiow  Tustanowice (1802-1889)
 Tyzlow  Uhnow  Ulyczno
 Untervalden (incl. in Uszkowice)  Ustrzyki Dolne (1855-1880)  Uszkowice
 Warez  Wierzblany  Witkow Nowy
 Witwica incl. Roztoczki & Gerynia  Wojnilow (3 vols, 1652-1839)  Wolica
 Wysocko  Wysoka & Buda  Wyzniany & vicinity
 Zablotow (3 vols)  Zaleszczyki (4 vols)  Zawidowice & Nojdorf
 Zbadyn  Zbaraz (8 vols)  Zloczow (50 vols)
 Zolkiew (24 vols)  Zoltantce  Zurawno (2 vols)
 Zydaczow (8 vols)

Thank You

Thank you, Alexander Dunai,  for this fine piece of research. I will be visiting your website and taking a further look at your other efforts too. Very nice website!

August 24, 2013

From The Mailbag … — #Genealogy, #Royalty, #Polish, #Szlachta

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

From the Post Office Department

From the Post Office Department

The minions in the Email-Room dropped off a missive at my virtual cubicle today. Today’s question is about Polish Royalty & DNA as it relates to genealogy …

Hi, I stumbled across your blog and thought you might could help me. We are searching for my father’s ancestry and think he is a Poniatowski. My grandfather Andrzej changed his name when he came to America in 1909. The story we always heard was that he was royal. So I have my father’s yDNA markers but cannot find a surname project online for the Poniatowskis or other Polish nobles. Do you know of any? Maybe you can give me some advice? I sure would appreciate it! Thanks in advance for sharing anything.
Sincerely,
Kristian Krawford
—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —

Kristian,

Welcome to the blog. DNA plays a role in genealogy in some ways, but it is NOT for every genealogist. It is due the certainty factor (I favor >97% certainty) takes you back beyond the number of generations that most people tracing Slavic/Polish genealogy can do UNLESS they have royal blood. Your question gives me yet another reason to endorse limited use of DNA in genealogy. I am in favor of using DNA in your case because, you want to determine if you have royal blood or not and specifically whether or not you are related to Poniatowski szlactha (nobility).

Now to the crux of your question. You have your family DNA and want to compare it. Ancestry.com has some capacity, but perhaps because they have so little Polish emphasis in their data, their DNA may be lacking from Polish genealogists families. So…

You can Google:  

  Y-DNA project of Polish Nobility families 

That led me to:

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/polish/default.aspx?section=ysnp

This web page had a very extensive list of family names with their DNA markers. I hope you can find your markers in these that are available. Notice that is “Y-DNA”. The mt-DNA will not work for you as that is the maternal/mitochondrial DNA that is passed from Mother to all children (relatively unchanged, except by mutation) and the Y-DNA is the paternal DNA passed from father to sons (23rd chromosome). The rest of the DNA is called autosomal / atDNA (see  Genealogical DNA test). This link is a good link for introduction of DNA terms to the genealogist.

Good Luck!

Stanczyk

August 22, 2013

#Meme — Things I Find Whilst Looking Up Other Things — #Genealogy, #Art, #GettyMuseum

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

DukeLudiwg_I_01

The Getty Museum released on 14th-August-2013 over 4,000 images into public domain (i.e. free). According to the ArtObserved article on the museum’s  public release made public on their Getty Iris blog, this is part of their, “Open Content” commitment of their digital resources.

You can search these images using:  Getty Search Gateway .

Stanczyk, knows what you’re thinking, “I am too busy on my genealogy to search through museum images”. But I politely urge you to reconsider. While I was searching their images, I found a genealogical family tree, of Duke Ludwig I of Brzeg (amongst many other images he commissioned). A Polish noble of house Piast. So if your family tree intersects, get thee to the Getty Museum. For those curious, I have posted the images to this blog. The text is Fraktur looking, gothic, German script.

.

.

Other Duke Ludwik I, Family Tree Images …

DukeLudiwg_I_02 DukeLudiwg_I_03

May 3, 2013

Polish Lithuania Commonwealth Constitution

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Consitution-May3rdMay 3rd Constitution (see middle of Warsaw Gazette).

Click on picture to see another article.

April 14, 2013

A Church Register Novelty in Koprzywnica — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poland_1807_1815_AnnotatedIn another case of finding something interesting whilst researching something else, I found a type of Church Register Index that I have not seen before in any other parish. So today’s blog is about that novel index I found. See the Church Register in the picture (see below).

Dateline Koprzywnica parish, 1810 – In what was after the 3rd partition was Austrian-Hungarian territory (Austrian-Poland in green), has now been annexed by Napoleon in 1809 into the Duchy of Warsaw and in another five years will be Congress Poland (Vistulaland, Russian-Poland). But in 1810 we are speaking of Koprzywnica in the powiat of Staszow and the Departement of Radom. No, that is not wojewodztwo — it is the French, Departement that is the highest level of administration in the Duchy of Warsaw. The map shows that a huge swath of green from the  Austrian-Poland partition (zabior) was annexed into the Duchy in 1809. Stanczyk’s own ancestors once again switched Empires from Austria to France. So too did the citizens of Koprzywnica (and a great many cities, towns, and villages). Poof, now the records go from Latin, in the perfunctory Latin Box (Table) Format to the lingua franca of Polish paragraph with French-style two witnesses.

So Koprzywnica, like Stanczyk’s own ancestral Villages (Biechów and Pacanów) was briefly Austrian, then French (very briefly), then Russian until 1917-1918 whence it became just Poland again. We can find Koprzywnica in the gazetteer, Skorowidz Miejscowoscy Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej as being in the powiat Sandomierz, wojewowdztwo Kielce (circa 1920’s/1930’s).

Indexes are so very helpful. It is always a let down when a parish book or a year within the book lacks any kind of index. That means I will have to look at each and every record to see if any are related to me / my research. Early Latin paragraph form church records often do not have any index  — they barely denote the year change. So that means you have to read each and every badly handwritten paragraph of Latin — very rare to find a priest with good Latin handwriting. That is why the Latin Box Format was more welcome. At least I could find the pieces of info and the handwriting was less of an issue. But the Latin Box format did not have indexes either.

So it was helpful when Napoleon implemented the Codex Napoleon in the Duchy of Warsaw. So by 1810 you see the records written in Polish (lingua franca) in a paragraph form that is specified by the Codex Napoleon. And these new records have indexes!

OK, the indexes initially are by letter: A, B, C, …, Z. So you have just under 26 pages of indexes. It is an improvement. Quickly the church realizes it can save paper by running the index all together with all letters on a single (or a few) page(s) in order alphabetically. Very efficient to scan these indexes for your families. And it was also easy to spot when a priest added a late addition to the index at the back after all other names (even though it was evidently in the wrong spot lexicographically speaking).

OK 1868-1918, we find Russian / Cyrillic indexes. In addition to priests not knowing Russian well and ordering names phonetically before later on,  we find the index in Cyrillic proper lexical order you will have to scan carefully. Cyrillic kind of forces that to those of us weaned on a Latin alphabet. But you sometimes find the Russian indexes sorted in Cyrillic lexical order … by the first name ??? That is not very useful. Sometimes the index is in chronological order (akt # / record # order) making it barely more useful then scanning every record.

But when we find a well formed index (or a not so good index) it is always for one event: Birth/Christening, Marriage / Marriage Banns, Death Records. One index for Births, one for Marriages and one for Deaths … assuming none are missing, 3 indexes. That is what makes the following index so very interesting …

The Index (Skorowidz)

1810KoprzywnicaINDEX_pg4_JewishNames_righthalf This was supposed to be a Marriage Index !! But it was five scanned pages! This would have to be an extraordinarily large city to have that many marriages! What are all of those columns ?? That is what I asked myself.

Let’s see what those columns are:  Record # (Akt #), Village Name, Person Name(s), Births (Urodzin), Deaths (Zeyscie), Banns (Zapowiedz), and finally Marriages(Malzenstwa) Kart # (you can safely ignore). This index is an all event index. Births-Deaths-Banns-Marriages all interleaved. In fact, when I look at each event (B/M/D) I see the same 99 event-record pages and the same five index pages. It appears that all events are in the same register! This is rather unique — as I said previously I have not seen this before in other parish registers I have seen.

So in this “combo style” index (which needs a proper name) you cannot have a single name  for marriage record, so marriage records have two names (as usual), but this requires two lines in this style of index — since we are multi-columnar. We also see that Banns are indicated ‘I‘ or ‘II‘ — the third bann being the actual marriage itself. The Roman numeral written above the word Zapowiedz. So since the index is in Akt# order, it is a chronological order too. It could be interesting from a demographic perspective (what time of year do most marriages occur or  do a higher concentration of deaths occur in winter months). If this style index had occurred during an epidemic year, then we could have seen all of the deaths occurring in a great streak without interruption by other events. 1810 in Koprzywnica was not such an epidemic year.

There is one more fascinating aspect to this index. In the Napoleonic era (1807 thru 1829) we find that Catholic priest acts as the civil administrator and that Jewish/Evangelic/Orthodox vital records are written in the Catholic register. How is this noted in the index — which again I have not seen elsewhere? Look at the scanned register image for this blog. Pay attention to Records #’s:

85, 86, and 91.

It so happens that each of these records is a Marriage Banns event type. But, notice that each begins ‘Zyda‘.  Żyd = Jew, hence Żyda is plural for Jews. Żydów = Jewish. This indicates that this is a Jewish civil record being recorded.  Now I know that Jewish vital records are recorded in the Napoleonic era Catholic registers. But it is unusual that it is indicated in the index (as opposed to being in the record itself).

So this was a very fascinating find after all. I was actually looking for a particular Leszczyński but I found a novel index and indeed a novel parish register overall.

Related Posts

The Fourth Partition (23 January 2013) – A Discussion of the Duchy of Warsaw, with a map

Historical Eras of Poland (21 January 2013) – A set of Stanczyk defined eras of Poland of particular use to genealogists. An historical definition of Poland’s eras (1569-present) based upon history’s impact on genealogical research.

 

Post Scriptum

The index from this column was found in the Polish website: genealodzy.pl (PTG) of which I written many times before. Their METRYK project of scanned church books is where I found the 1810 Koprzywnica Index.

April 3, 2013

Wordless Wednesday … Polish Historical Calendar — #April, #Polish, #Historical, #Calendar

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  • 3 April/Kwiecień 2013 Dateline Philadelphia – Stanczyk,

Kalendarz Historyczny Polski (Kwiecień)

Polish Historical Calendar

April 1st – Death of Zygmunt I (King), 2nd – Death of Andrzej Leszczynski (Archbishop of Gniezno).

Hmmm, the month starts ominously. This jester likes that on the 20th- Krakow Cathedral (Church Blessing/Consecration, at founding?). A Good Day Indeed!

March 26, 2013

Cristobal Colon (Discoverer Formerly Known as Columbus) … Polish-Lithuanian & Italian Noble — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Lithuanian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Rosa_InPAStanczyk loves this story. That the discoverer formerly known as Christopher Columbus (who really should be known by his Portuguese name: Cristobal Colon) may be Polish-Lithuanian royalty.

Stanczyk has written a few times on this Columbus / Wladyslaw III genealogy-genetics-history riddle. The Don Quixote of this tale is Manuel Rosa (an an information technology analyst and amateur historian). Mr. Rosa’s claims of the Polish (or more properly Lithuanian, as in Jagiellonian) Wladyslaw III lineage date back to November 2010.

Prior Stanczyk Polish Columbus stories …

1. 02-December-2010 – Christopher Columbus Discovers … He Is POLISH!

2. 27-December-2010 – Wladislaw III – Father of Columbus

Plus a few mentions: 2011, & 2012 at the start of Polish Heritage Month (each October).

Well here is the latest update, from “the Lithuania Tribune“. You can read the lengthy article which is most informative.

Factual Claims:

  • Rosa has published two books (one in Spanish and one in Polish). NO English version yet.
  • Columbus married Filipa Moniz Perestrelo. Filipa was not only daughter of a high noble and Captain of the Portuguese Island of Porto Santo, but a member of the elite Portuguese Military Order of Santiago
  • Cristobal Colon’s noble wife: Filipa Moniz was one of the twelve elite “donnas” of the Portuguese Military Order of Santiago.
  • Colon was descended from legendary Roman General Colonius (not listed in wikipedia List of Roman Generals )
  • Columbus never wrote in Italian or Genoese [not even to his brothers]
  • Columbus’ writings were: rough Castilian punctuated by noteworthy and frequent Portuguese words
  • Prof. José Lorente’s DNA studies prove that the discoverer Cristóbal Colón’s DNA did not match any of 477 Colombo families from the Genoa area.
  • Colón was a royal prince, son of a Portuguese noblewoman from the Italian Colonna family and a man named Henrique Alemão (Henry the German) resident on the Portuguese island of Madeira
  • Henrique Alemão (Henry the German) = false moniker of Wladyslaw III used for hiding on Madiera Island (presumably from the Ottomans)
  • 1498 Will and later Genoese documents proved to be forgeries/fakes
  • Prince Georges Paleologue de Bissipat, an exiled Byzantine nobleman living in France nicknamed “Colombo the Younger”, said to be a relative of Christopher Columbus was also a relative of King Wladyslaw III

The author laments (“… it is lamentable that, up until now, there is little or no debate in America or Lithuania to either accept or contradict”) that only Portuguese and Polish academics have currently debated this topic. Well then Rosa needs to have published/translated the book in Lithuanian and English if he wishes for further debate.

Are there any historians out there? Can anyone refute or supply proof of the above factual claims? Columbus letters and their language should be easy to establish. What about these other people named: General[Roman] Colonius, Portuguese nobles related to Filipa Moniz Perestrelo, or Prince Georges Paleologue de Bissipat ? Come on European Historians help out this poor jester with some factual links or books/documents — so much is online these days.

The next Manuel Rosa appearance is: April 6, 2013, where Manuel Rosa will present a lecture at Boalsburg’s Columbus Chapel, (http://www.boalmuseum.com/columbus-lecture.html) where more evidence will be presented, in Boalsburg, PA which is North-West of Harrisburg (contact: contact 814-466-9266 or office@boalmuseum.com).

I’d love to have this story proven true or false. It is time for the sensationalism to end. Did National Geo ever televise this story as reported earlier? This jester never saw it. What happened with the Colon DNA being compared to Wladyslaw III descendants? So far we only have that he is not related to Colombos who are Genoese. But since he had Roman heritage, I presume he has some Italian DNA. What about the Slavic DNA? Those pesky Slavic DNA markers are pretty different from Italian DNA markers. I am hoping we have Y-Chromosome DNA testing which should show Slavic markers and MT DNA testing which should show Italian/Portuguese markers.

I accept that Cristobal Colon must have had royal blood to marry a noble woman and have such access to European courts. I also accept that a noble man would have had the education that a peasant wool-worker could never have had. I am uncertain about the heraldic symbols. The rest I am unqualified to judge — hence the plea for help.

March 24, 2013

Gazetteers, Maps, and Genealogy — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Maps, #Gazetteer

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Block_Stanczyk, has been busy revisiting the Metryk (metrical, vital records) images from genealodzy.pl of the various parishes/synagogues [hereafter I just use ‘parish’ as shorthand for ‘parish/synagogue’]. As my blog, Waiting For Polish Archives 2.4 M Scans (March 18th, 2013), indicated, I have been exhausting the possibilities for Biechow & Zborowek parishes in the Buski (Busko-Zdroj) powiat. The images are clearer, so I am replacing my existing images with these much better images. In some cases, I have found that the images of the Polish paragraph format provide me with additional details over what may have been available via only a Latin Box format copy that I might have previously had. At the very least, I have corrected a few mistakes of translation due to unreadable portions from prior microfilm I have read from/taken pictures of. So I strongly encourage others to make this effort.

I have been using the Metryk database and looking at the images/scans. Sometimes you have to look at dozens of images because there is NO index. But most of the collection (post 1812) have indexes. If you see SKU (that means index/skorowidz of births/urodziny), likewise  for SKM (for marriage), and SKZ (for death) indexes. Sometimes indexes spread across multiple pages, so you may see SK1, SKa (names begining with the letter ‘A’) or SKU1, etc. SO use these indexes to look for your family names, then just load up the scan of the akt (record) number for your ancestor — no need to search  through a multitude of images.

I have also used Geneszukacz as another kind of index to search for family names. These indexes are nice because I can catch ancestors getting married (or dying or giving birth) in another parish that I might not have known to check. If this previously unknown parish is one that has scans, then I go directly to the year/event for that parish and go to the akt specified in Geneszukacz!

So that is all great and I exhort you to do this.

But these new, previously unknown parishes. Where are they? How far away from the ancestral village are they? That is when I need a gazetteer (check out Stanczyk’s Gazetter page) or a map. If you have not been to the Polish War Map Archive (Archiwum Map Wojskowego), then today’s blog is your reason to do so. I have a map on my wall of my ancestral villages. The map’s name is: STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32. In fact, I use their MAP INDEX, 1:100,000 scale map tiled in squares (http://igrek.amzp.pl/mapindex.php?cat=WIG100). Please NOTE these map images are from about 4MB to 7MB in size. Make sure you are at a Free WiFi cafe where you can use a high-speed and the large band-width for the map images you download.

When you see, PAS think ROW and when you see SLUP think COLUMN. This is a big Cartesian Grid (or computer types can think 2d-array). It turns out that STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32 has: Biechow, Pacanow, Ksiaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Szczucin, Beszowa, Olesnica, and STOPNICA. In fact, that one map has many more parishes than those that I enumerated. I have a small snippet of the Map Index below (you can click on the image and it will take you to the actual map index):

MapIndex_MapyWig

So I found an ELIJASZ ancestor in Koniemloty parish getting married, who was from PACANOW parish. Now from the Metryk web app, I knew Koniemloty was in STASZOW powiat. So I go to the Map Index and look at the grid near STOPNICA (P47_S32) and voila, STASZOW is the box due north of STOPNICA in PAS46_SLUP32. If you cannot locate you powiat that way, then you must drop back to MAPA.SZUKACZ.pl (an interactive map that I have raved about before) and look for KONIEMLOTY (do not need to use diacriticals) to get the relative feel that it is north or east (or north-east). So any way, STASZOW_PAS46_SLUP32 is the map for KONIEMLOTY parish. Notice PAS46 is one row less than PAS47 (of STOPNICA). PAS decreasing is going north, PAS increasing is going south. Going east from STASZOW, we see the SLUP increases to SLUP33  (SANDOMIERZ) or going west the SLUP decreases to SLUP31 (PINCZOW). So now you can now work  with the Map Index using the cardinal directions by adding/subtracting to/from the rows/columns.

P.S. Since this is the Passover (Pesach) / Easter (Wielkanoc) season, let me honor my wife (Tereza) by pointing out that her paternal grandfather, Benjamin Solomon, had as a birth village, Proskuriw (aka PŁOSKIRÓW, Хмельницький/Khmelnitski — now in Modern Ukraine). This village is shown in the lower right-hand corner of my map snippet (PAS51_SLUP44).

February 11, 2013

Polish National Archives to post 2.4 Million Historic Church Records — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk ‘s position has been overrun! I was trying to write a blog, but the course of events has been running at EXTREME Internet speed so much of this blog post may be “old news” to you — but in case its not, this is very exciting news!

NAC Scanning 2.4 Million RecordsAccording to a Polish website (The National Digital Library of Poland) …

URL: http://nac.gov.pl/node/682

  • By mid-year (2013), they plan to digitize 2.3 Million  historical  (>100 years old) vital records.
  • This will happen in two phases: March,  June
  • This PDF file (see link) lists 40 pages vital records from MANY parishes (a few synagogues too):
  • It appears the plan is to digitize about 1.37 Million records by March and the remainder (another 1 Milliion) by the end of June.

These are actual church record images! I hope they plan on digitizing records from the Kielce Archive (please do PACANOW, BIECHOW, SWINIARY, BESZOWA, ZBOROWEK, KSIAZNICE and STOPNICA parishes).

Can anyone detail the plans for JUNE yet? Unfortunately, the 1.37 Million records in March are NOT from the KIELCE archive or any parish where Stanczyk’s ancestors resided?

Do not forget about GENETEKA database in the meantime:

Thanks in advance for any answers from our genealogists resident in Poland!

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