Archive for ‘Genealogy’

June 9, 2018

Part 3 of Alegata As Time Machine — #Polish #Genealogy #Russian-Poland #Partition #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Biechow 1878 Alegata - Page 12 of Alegata for Marriage 15Stanczyk, welcomes you to the third part of this multi-part Alegata As Time Machine series. As the title suggests this is the third part.

Parts 1 & 2 can be reviewed below:

  1. Alegata As Time Machine — I
  2. Alegata As Time Machine — II

There have been some prior alegata articles (in case you are binging):

  1. 1878 Marriage – Russian Empire bride + Austrian Empire groom
  2. Another Alegata Article
  3. Clever Use Of Alegata

Today’s article is we are going to dissect a typical article and see what we can expect to find. In the fourth part we will look at many sample portions to see the type we might encounter.

First off, be aware that you can click on the images to see larger version of the images to see the fine details. Second, let me remind you, dear reader, that alegata are mostly found in Russian Poland partition but the general knowledge still holds, though the year and the partition may dictate a different language. In this series we will see Russian/Cyrillic, Polish (Latin alphabet), and Latin (the actual language) among the samples. In fact, you may see more than one language in an alegata.

1878 Alegata dissectedToday’s alegata is about the bride who was born outside the parish who is now living in the local parish (Biechów). So the bride is proving she was baptised to marry in the local church.

Let’s look at the various pieces and derive their meaning in this common sample.

Number (1) — It is in Russian. Its meaning is, “Record (akt) # 121, RZEGOCIN”. This margin note ties the data back the Ostrowce parish (in Kielce gubernia, Grotniki gmina). We will see the event type and the year of the remote record in a bit.

Number (2) — Do you see the light, pencilled, “12”? That is what the second bullet pertains to. This “12” indicates we are on the 12th page of alegata. The left side of the image is page 11 and the right side is page 12. The left side, is usually, the back of the prior page’s text.

Number (3) — The top header text, relatively bold in ink is Russian text indicating this is an alegata for an 1878 marriage, the akt #, in the local parish’s 1878 marriages. For the record we are looking Biechow parish (Kielce gubernia, Stopnica gmina), 1878 Alegata book on page 12 (this image).

Number (4) — The fourth part, we are calling out is the record # (akt #) that this alegata is for. In this case it is for Marriage Akt 15, in Biechow parish Marriages.

Number (5) — The fifth bullet is the top of the remote record. It indicates the event type from the remote parish that this alegata page is about. In this case we are looking at a birth record. In Russian/Cyrillic, “рождение” (birth).

Number (6) — The final bullet, (6), is about the birth record (in Polish) and more specifically, the year of that record, which in this case is 1861. Now this is fortuitous because, the online births end at 1859. So for birth years 1860 and forward you would normally have to write to the parish (Ostrowce, św.Jana Chrzciciela) to get this birth record.  At the bottom of the record is the date:

Ostrowce, 4/16th day of August, 1878 (the date this record was extracted from that remote parish’s books).

One final note. Did you notice that the birth was written in Polish (not Russian)? If the remote event record was before 1868 then it will be in Polish. Galicia records are in Latin.

To see the Alegata side-by-side with the Marriage record click on “Continue reading”

read more »

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June 4, 2018

Alegata As Time Machine — Part 2

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

I wanted to show the availability of alegata in parishes that were in or nearby my ancestral parishes. So the table below shows how common (or rare) alegata are.  They seem to range from about 1813 (before Napoleon’s final defeat, and the subsequent formation of Congress Poland / Russian-Empire Polish partition). The 1813 I saw was in Polaniec (and is not shown in the table below). The latest as we see in the table below is 1923. There may be more after that year but perhaps privacy rules prevent their being published until later. So we have about 110 year range to view alegata.

The time machine aspect comes into play because the alegata are recorded in the year they are for. The actual request may have been in 1989 and the earliest year for which the alegata gets data is 1720. So the time machine spans 269 years while the alegata only cover 110 years. So we are gaining 100 years on the early side and 66 years on the later side. While this time span is not complete (i.e. not everybody’s data is shown, it is extraordinarily helpful to those whose ancestor does have an alegata in reference to. Hence, why I call it a time machine. We might see a request from the 1950’s for a record in late 1800’s in an alegata book dated 1901. In some cases (particularly the earlier years), we may find a record that was subsequently lost, but due to an alegata request, it was saved in duplicate and thus preserved for some lucky genealogist even though the original book may have been lost/stolen/burned.

Parish Alegata Available (nearby parishes)

Parish Year Range Parish Year Range
Biechow 1875 — 1882 Opatowiec 1887
Biechow 1884 — 1893 Pacanow 1875 — 1897
Biechow 1895 Pacanow 1899 — 1905
Biechow 1897 — 1901 Pacanow 1907 — 1908
Biechow 1904 — 1908 Stopnica 1875 — 1878
Busko 1912 Stopnica 1887
Busko 1914 Stopnica 1889 — 1892
Busko 1916 Stopnica 1894 — 1897
Dobrowoda 1875 — 1894 Stopnica 1901 — 1903
Dobrowoda 1896 — 1898 Stopnica 1905 — 1906
Dobrowoda 1901 Stopnica 1909
Dobrowoda 1903 — 1914 Stopnica 1913
Olesnica 1875 — 1890 Stopnica 1923
Olesnica 1892 — 1913 Szczebrzusz 1875
Opatowiec 1823 Szczebrzusz 1877 — 1891
Opatowiec 1826 — 1830 Szczebrzusz 1894
Opatowiec 1832 — 1834 Szczebrzusz 1896 — 1900
Opatowiec 1839 — 1844 Szczebrzusz 1903
Opatowiec 1872 Zborowek 1875 — 1887
Opatowiec 1875 — 1879 Zborowek 1889 — 1895
Opatowiec 1881 — 1885 Zborowek 1897 — 1908

At present, I am compiling a spreadsheet from the alegata in the above table. I’ll probably publish an analysis of my findings. In some article after the findings, I may write an article on the stamps seen in an alegata and what their purpose was. But right now I wanted to answer again why is there an alegata.

Why an alegata?

The reasons are more varied then I had originally assumed. Here are some reasons, you will find an alegata:

  1. The groom (mostly) or the bride or perhaps both were born in another, remote parish.
  2. The bride or the groom  (or both) were widowed.
  3. The wife is notified in a letter(s) that her husband has died in military service and is now a widow.
  4. The far flung future requests a church record from the past.
  5. The future provides a court document of a vital record change or asks for information on an individual(s).
  6. A remote parish or USC notifies an original parish of a death or a marriage (see #1).

There may be other reasons too. But at any rate, if you see a marriage in your parish books and (you see the groom is from an outside parish or the bride was born elsewhere, then you should look to see if there exists an alegata. The alegata will provide additional data substantiating the marriage can take place.

I once found an alegata about an ancestor when there was only alegata online (typically not indexed). It had info about a marriage that was yet to be published online. Further more, both the groom and bride were widowed and hence I was also provided with death data on the prior spouses.  The marriage and the alegata taken together can provide you a means to track down your migrating ancestors and where they came from or where they moved to.

Also, please note, that as of the present (4-June-2018), no Alegata have been indexed. So that data is a complete mystery. So who knows what treasures you might find, just by doing an exhaustive search through alegata.

Next time, a sample of what alegata look like, so you know what you are seeing. It can be confusing due to the multitude of time eras involved (seeing multiple languages) or you may see many differing forms due to the various timeframes involved. We’ll break it down in a rather lengthy blog article with pictures and descriptions.

read more »

May 21, 2018

British Royalty Has Polish Royalty DNA — #19th #Cousins

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19 Generations back to Wladyslaw Jagiello (from Prince Harry)

British Royal Family Tree

Prince Harry & Duchess of Sussex Meghan will have children who are 19th cousins to Władysław Jagiełło King of Poland & Grand Duchy Of Lithuania (& Queen Jadwiga)!

❤ 🇵🇱 🇲🇱 🇬🇧 💙

[Thanks to source: http://www.moremaiorum.pl]

Family Tree Pdf:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1hggrx3ZygJUKTHrc5Fz_kzrQTopjPWw6

May 17, 2018

Alegata Are Genealogy Time Machines — #Genealogy #Polish #ChurchRecords

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Early Alegata: 1823, 1826, 1827…

       Opatowiec Parish in Kielce Gubernia

Stanczyk loves alegata. Let’s see you have Birth (urodzony/chrzest), Marriage (małżeństwo/słuby, zapiowiedzi), Alegata, Death (Zgony/Śmierci). The cycle of life via church records (sacrements). Reading alegata are very interesting indeed. Sometimes its like gossip… “Do you know who is getting married here?” Other times its solemn, like the death of a soldier. But it is a time machine of sorts, that allows you to see backward and on rare occasions forward. It is this time machine capability that may help you locate missing records.

What are Alegata?

Alegat is a Polish word of Latin origin, from allegatio, “sending someone as an intermediary; a citation of proof; a submitted document.”

It is not only an interesting relic of phraseology from ecclesiastical language, it provides great potential genealogical documents of significance. This word, seemingly forgotten and archaic, is currently undergoing a rebirth, precisely because of genealogy. Many beginning researchers do not know about the existence and meaning of these documents. Alegata is the plural of Alegat. Sometimes they are found at the end of church books as loose pages. When they are found in their own books, they are called Alegata or Aneksy. They are most common in the former Russian-Poland partition. As is shown in the picture (by red arrows) they date to just after the Napoleonic Era.

What were Alegata Used For?

These are Polish Church documents to establish an eligibility for a church sacrament. Most often they are used for marriages. Their purpose is often to document a death and thus making the widow/widower eligible to remarry in the church. Sometimes its used where the groom (most often) if from a remote/foreign parish is a baptised Catholic. I have seen a few other purposes: name change, soldier’s death, etc. Often the inquiries in later years are from courts or remote Polish parishes and are forms.  However, for the genealogist, they can fill in the gap for a missing church record. Often because of the marriage aspect, they can help you (the genealogist) track movements of your ancestors across parishes. In the coming articles, we’ll look at a few examples.

May 7, 2018

Searchin’ for Sobieszczanski — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Sobieszczanski ( собещаньский )

   114               Sobieszczanski        Jan

A ponderously long search for an ancestral parish is over!

Stanczyk was humbled. This jester could always find someone’s ancestral parish in the Russian-Poland partition (zabory). Yet in his own family tree the Sobieszczanski (aka Sobb) I was unable to locate.

Doubling the frustration is I had Stanisław (Stanley) Roman Sobieszczanski ‘s Naturalization papers. It plainly said Lesnik, Russian Poland.

Declaration of Intent

The problem? In the Skorowidz Miejscowości Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej there were 19 Lesnik/Lesniki and in the Russian-Poland Gazetteer there were another handful (some possibly overlapping as they were different time periods. There were no LESNIK. I had to consider diacriticals (accents). The L could be Ł and the e could be ę and the s could be ś and the n could be ń. Thankfully, the i and k did not have diacritics. But that still left a lot of combinations. But one-by-one I searched. I looked up in the gazeteers and found parishes. Some were not online, but many were. Alas, those online did not have any Sobieszczanski. I searched http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php  (Lubgens)  and there were Sobieszczanski, but I could not confirm they were mine. No Lesnik. I searched in geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl too and again I found Sobieszczanski but again no good matches and not good enough locations to believe that is what Stanley meant.

That’s when I thought to look at a map that indicated parishes. I still thought Lesnik was a parish. So I went to: http://ipgs.us/mapinfo/atlas1907/main.html . I looked at the Lublin powiat (map 31); nothing promising, but I did see a village on the border of an adjacent powiat named Sobieszczany, so I thought perhaps they came from there. So I looked in the adjacent Janow (map39) and I found a couple of Lesnik (duzy/maly) villages in B3 quadrant.

I could not find Lesnik Duzy or Maly in any gazetteer???. Frustration. In looking at map 39, I saw Marynopol looked to be near a circle with a cross that indicated a parish. But I could not find Marynopol in the gazetteer. Very puzzling. I tried to  find nearly named towns and I did find one but it was in Kielce gubernia, not Lublin. So I looked and saw GOSCIERADOW. I quick checked metryki.genebaza.pl and saw they had GOSCIERADOW in Kielce-AP Sandomierz. Only 1890-1901 but at least I could see if there were any Sobieszczanski and get my bearings as too what Sobieszczanski looked like in Russian/Cyrillic and in cursive handwriting. My first try I found Jan Sobieszcanski in 1891 (see top pic).  His record indicated he lived in LISNIK. Well what do you know Jan’s parents were Michal Sobieszczanski & Stanislawa Kowalska and these were the names I had from Stanley’s first marriage record in USA (Depew, NY). So I was pretty sure (99%) that I had my parish. But they did not go back before 1890 and Stanley clearly enumerated many times his birth year was 1886. However, his younger brother Tadeusz had come to the USA as well and I had his info, so I looked up the birth year and it was 1896! Ok, they had that year in the range 1890-1901, so I should find a Tadeusz in 1896 (+/- 1 year).  Ok, his birthday was in October (not December), but the year and the parent names were exact matches, the village a very close match. I was now 100% certain I had my parish and my family. Success!

P.S.

LISNIK DUZY was in the gazetteer and GOSCIERADOW was the parish.

May 2, 2018

1916

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1916 Busko parish book of marriages

Busko – 1916 Marriages

Stanczyk, always thought that while Poland was partitioned (1772-1918) and from 1868-1918 that the vital records and other “official” documentation in the Russian partition (zabór) were written in Russian / Cyrillic. Perhaps that is not PRECISELY true.

Consider for example the image with this article. In fact let us examine marriage #4 (at the bottom image), bewteen Waclaw Balabanski & Maryanna Zwolska. All of the text is written in Polish (not Russian, nor Latin). Even the index for 1916 was written in Polish/Latin characters. However, in 1915 the records were written in Russian/Cyrillic characters. Now this is a rural part of Poland and perhaps lacking in oversight, but cognizant of the politics/war raging.

What may be happening and reflected in the church records is, that in 1915 a temporary client-state was setup by Germany & Austria-Hungary due to the Russia’s  withdrawal from the World War (I) and the chaos in the Russian Empire (with the Bolshevik revolution in 1917). So the Russian-Poland partition was not so obliged to write in Russian any more now that there was no more Russian hegemony in Poland.

What lovely information these books show, besides the marriage in 13-February-1916, we also see the death dates for the bride groom in 1951, 1979. We also get precise birthdays for the newlyweds as well as their ages.

May 1, 2018

HRH Prince Louis Arthur Charles — #Birth #Certificate

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

HRH Princess Charlotte — Birth Certificate

We have the young Prince Louis ‘s Birth Certificate!

Compare to (his siblings ) …

  1. HRH Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana
  2. HRH Prince George Alexander Louis

 

 

HRH Prince George - Birth CertificatePrince Louis Arthur Charles - Birth Certificate

April 23, 2018

Duke & Duchess of Cambridge — #3rd #Baby

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Royal Genealogy update … HRH Queen Elizabeth has a new great-grandson (son of Duke William of Cambridge and Duchess Kate Middleton). The baby’s name will be announced in two days!

• New Prince of Cambridge born at 11am weighing 8lbs 7oz

• Mother and baby ‘doing well’, Kensington Palace says

Birthdate: 23-April-2018

Birthplace: St. Mary’s Hospital, London

[update: 4/27/2018 —

Name: Louis Arthur Charles

(Prince Louis the Vth in line for the throne).

Video

Line of Succession for the 92 year old HRH Queen Elizabeth


April 16, 2018

All Politics Is Genealogy — #Politics #Genealogy #USCensus #2020

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

When you’re a jester, you see politics from afar and for such a good many eras. Alas, this jester has typed truth to power for as long as blogs have existed. Still, the 2010’s have been an unusually busy decade (and we still have two more years) for politics & genealogy. Do you agree?

Let’s recount some from this decade:

Obama was not born in USA. Uh, yes he was. Birth Certificate from Hawaii and newspaper announcement substantiated to all but DJT. Oh, how about Trump’s genealogy? Ancestor kicked out of Germany (for illegal emigration). John McCain was born in Panama Canal Zone. American? Yes. Mitt Romney was born in Mexico. American ? Yes. How about Ted Cruz and his Canadian birth to a Cuban father & an American mother who renounced her citizenship and registered & voted in Canada … yet still he professes that he is an American. Me thinks he professes too much.

We also heard and continue to hear about Elizabeth Warner (dubbed Pocohantas by DJT) who talked about her family lore/genealogy including American Indian ancestry (Cherokee). So its 2018, DJT who dodged military service by bonespurs, like his banned ancestor (grandfather was it?) that was kicked out of Germany for not serving in the army before emigrating illegally. Now he wants to deport DACA (Dreamers), even though we have Ted Cruz as a Senator, and a FLOTUS who overstayed her visa and used the “Einstein Exceptional Immigrant” law to be admitted legally (and then chain migrated her parents) to the USA. Oh it does not end there, now the GOP want to bring back an old question on the 2020 census:  “Where were you born and/or are you a US citizen?”

The census genealogy is a new wrinkle in voter suppression and representation. But it also could affect health care & hospitals and all manner of government expenditures that are based upon census demographics. This is actually a very important issue. So let’s unpack the nuances about the census, that most valuable of genealogy documents.

US Censuses

There are a few states that have utilized censuses as well but that is another blog. The US Census has been going every 10 years from 1790-2010, the next being 2020. They do not occur on years ending in ‘5’ as the press secretary seemed to allude. They also have a 72 year privacy rule. So why not fill out the census? It is after all the primary and sole method for apportioning representation. Do not be scared off or representation will go elsewhere (primarily southward). These are precisely the states that have enacted voter suppression laws that discriminate against poor or non-white citizens. So in effect you will be limiting voting and representation to places that are NOT protecting the constitution or your rights given you therein. This is why the census brouhaha in 2018 is so contentious. 2020 Census is coming and what you are asked needs to be finalized … ASAP!

Here is the 72 year privacy rule info:

72 year rule

The U.S. government will not release personally identifiable information about an individual to any other individual or agency until 72 years after it was collected for the decennial census. This “72-Year Rule” (92 Stat. 915; Public Law 95-416; October 5, 1978) restricts access to decennial census records.

After 72 years and then only under circumstances protecting against disclosure to the detriment of any individual according to  44 U.S.C. 2104  (from  Federal Records Act of 1950).

So protection safeguards are built in.

So a president that berates immigrants  (except those he’s married to) as criminals, he reneges on DACA, increases deportations and threatens to limit immigration to rules of his own choosing is talking about Census questions. Why? The answer appears to be, to intimidate naturalized citizens, permanent resident immigrants, visa visitors, and of course those who are not here legally or who over stayed their visas from being counted. As late as April 16th, 2018, the president was saying, the census would be used to prevent illegal voting!?! Uh, Mr. President, the census is private for 72 years, even if an illegal immigrant could vote illegally (not possible), he’d vote in as many as 18 Presidential elections before you knew HE did it. So that is another idiotic premise and fake justification for needing the census question. But it does show your intent to intimidate people, possibly legal citizens who were born elsewhere and became a naturalized citizen. That IS disenfranchisement of voters; voter intimidation. It is illegal. So that is the context on which the battle lines have been drawn.

But they should be counted. The naturalized citizens are entitled to voting (the other classes not). But each is entitled to representation in government as they are taxpayers. Additionally, funding for infrastructure or hospitals and other aid are apportioned by population. If you are not counted then you are losing out on government spending.  Now homeless or poor people who lack documentation or the means to get documentation may be afraid of the government. But if you are not counted then they too stand to lose from  social safety net programs be eliminated or moved to other population centers according to apportionment. So make sure you are counted in the census you are protected! Do not lose your government spending to another locale out of fear or intimidation.

There will be NO access to personally identifiable info for 72 years. The only access is too summaries and other aggregations of the numbers to study issues related to government budgets.

 

Census Questions

The questions from every prior census can be examined at: census questions . Now there are short forms and there are long forms, so there is no short answer to when was the last time a question about citizenship was asked. Before the Civil War the counting questions were more or less related to being male, female, black, white, free, slave.

1860 is the first time the question, “Where were you born?” was asked, including country if not USA. In 1900, they finally ask if you are a citizen or not (as well as where you were born and where your parents were born). So we see a new nuance of citizenship vs nativity. 1970 starts the concept of short form vs long form questions. 85% were short form. The short form did not ask where you were born. The long form asked both where and whether naturalized. 1980 short form merely asks if you are Spanish/Hispanic (not where born or whether a citizen). The Long form (every 7th person) does ask where born & citizenship. Its not clear but it appears as if households with fewer than 7 people just filled in short form.

Be a good citizen. Be an informed citizen and go to:

https://www.census.gov/history/

April 15, 2018

Poland Genealogy Between 1918-1939

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has noted an uptick in interest in my Army Conscripts (poborowe) pages.

  1. Conscript Lists of Kieleckie Wojewodztwo
  2. Genealogy in Poland Between The Wars (1918-1939, Conscript Lists)

Here is a link to Google Doc (large PDF):

1932 Conscript List — https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AGfIiAjrkiwSvopGOBYSFx7W96-8jIR_

April 9, 2018

Swabian Germans / Donau Schwabians — #Genealogy #German #Croatian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

All the way to the east (right) we see Osiek (by red 3. ), you will find Sarvas & Tenje and a bit further away west (left) & south we see Đakovo(aka Djakovo, Diakovo) written as “Diakovar” (near red 2.).

This is where a bit of my MT-DNA comes from. You see my Swabian German ancestors came from Baden-Wurtemberg Germany to Sarvas & Tenje about 1750. They were Catholic Germans.

These are the ancestral villages I am working with on my maternal side.

In Tenje we find: Gottler/Göttler, Eisenbeiser. In Sarvas, we find Vespek (aka Veszpek, Vesbek).

Recently, this jester made good head way into tracing genealogy in these parts. So I have my Swabian German from these ancestors (via Vendel born 1858) …

April 5, 2018

Croatia, German, Genealogy — #Sarvas, #Tenje, #Djakowo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kettler = Gettler (aka Gottler/Goettler)

One could be excused if you thought this blog was solely upon Russian-Polish partition genealogy. Well Stanczyk has another branch (maternal) that is German. I have been told they were Swabian Germans located in modern day Croatia in the Osiek-Baranja county, specifically: Sarvas, Tenje, and Djakovo. This area was Austria-Hungary, Jugoslavia and now Croatia, but there were German Catholic settlers here.


Today is a quick post on the area and the family names of interest. This database can be searched online at FamilySearch.org (Croatia). According to Google Maps it is only about 10 minutes (via car) or about 90 minutes on foot between Sarvas and Tenja.

Now this interesting to Stanczyk, because his maternal grandparents came from these two villages/towns. Vespek came from Sarvas and Gottler came from Tenja. As with other families, there are affiliated families that are “genetic markers” to my Vespek & Gottler families: Reiner, Reither/Rajter, Elter, Keller, Eisenbeiser, Kasper/Kaschper.

What I learned from other Gottler researchers in this area is that I should expect to see that Gottler = Gettler = Goettler. Think “get” not “got”. The ‘O’ has an umlaut over it. So Gottler. Now If you look closely at the image at top, we see the priest recorded Gettler in two ways (Gettler, Kettler). In fact he recorded that equivalence in the record! So now I have to keep Kettler/Kottler in mind as well.

Now the jester mentioned Djakovo (which is a bit west of the map’s left border) because my mother’s two half brothers (Joseph & Wendell) emigrated from “Jakovo” from an uncle whose last name was Rajter. Now I know their mother’s maiden name was Eisenbeiser, so I am expecting to find an Eisenbeiser + Rajter(Reither) marriage in one of these villages.

More later as my research firms up. But if you have an ancestor from Sarvas and in particular House #43 in Sarvas, then we need to compare family trees.

 

March 24, 2018

Polish Genealogy Blog — #RussianPoland #partition #KielceGubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Stopnica and surrounding areas: Pacanow, Biechow, Olesnica, Zborowek, ...

Click for Full Size image

The parishes on this map (large) are the predominant parishes that Stanczyk writes about. So If you ancestral villages are here or more generally in Kielce (Kieleckie) Gubernia /  Wojewodztwo  (now SwietoKrzyskie) then you can learn some useful information to help you in your genealogy research. Feel free to email questions too!

Parishes (partial list) / Parafia (Russian-Poland partition):

Beszowa, Biechow, Olesnica, Ostrowce, Pacanow, Polaniec, Ruda, Solec, Stopnica, Swiniary, Szczebrzusz, Zborowek


Below the Visutla River / Wisla  Rzeka (Austrian-Poland partition):

Slupiec, Suchy Grunt, Szczucin, Wadowice Dolny, Wolka

 

March 22, 2018

Conscription Lists of Kieleckie Województwo — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1932 Kielce Conscript ListOn St. Patrick’s Day, Stanczyk wrote about two Conscription Lists (poborowi) from the 1930’s in Kielce Woj. There were 9,300++ records of families in this province/state whose son was born between 1891-1911.

Now this being an era immediately preceding World War 2, it is important to Jewish genealogists whose families lost 6 million family members, about 3 million in Poland alone (even 1 million Christian Poles) were lost to NAZI concentration camps. So alternative sources are critical.

That makes these Conscript Lists vital. In, my analysis of the smaller list (1933 had 2,000 families), almost 25% were Jewish families! So between 1932 & 1933 there were 9,300 families listed. If that 25% holds for both years, then Jewish genealogists can locate about 2,325 families (a conscript, man & his parents). The conscript is listed with his birth year, and residence. So that is some good data for genealogists, plus you can see the original spelling of the family name.

I am hopeful that I will have a laptop soon and be able to build a database of these vital records. Until then you can contact this jester via email and ask about your family (must be from Kielce Województwo) and I’ll look through the two Conscript Lists for you.

If your ancestor is from another Polish Województwo then you can search online archives or digital libraries for “poborowi” to locate conscript lists from those Województwa.

March 21, 2018

Calculating Consanguinity — #Genealogy #Genetic #Internet

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Y Chromosome ?

Stanczyk learned a new trick! There is software called Wolfram Wolfram AlphaAlpha. It parses your textual question and answers it via its AI/Mathematics engine. The software is similar to smart-assistants like  Siri or Alexa being asked a question, except Alpha coming from Wolfram is really great at math. It also is parsing your typed words. So I mostly used it for math. But, a facebook user told me to use Wolfram Alpha to calculate if our common ancestor indicated kinship. It did not:

My grand-aunt’s husband’s first cousin’s wife

Degree of kinship

I could try my cousin’s son who just tested his DNA. Do we share a Y chromosome?

1st cousin once removed

Since this jester is indeed male, we do share a Y-chromosome. Our degree of kinship is five (father, grandparents, uncle, 1stcousin,

1stcousin-once-removed). Our blood relationship is 3.125% (1/32). Now the 32 (in 1/32) is derived from the degree of kinship. (1/(2^5))= 1/32= 0.03125= 3.125% . Very cool. Now I don’t need to keep a chart around to calculate my degree of kinship or estimated percentage of dna shared.

Thanks Camille N Greg!

Now some useful notes for you to try. The Wolfram Alpha is an iphone app and its also a web app, runable via a link (URL):

http://m.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=my+uncle%27s+grandson

Notice I took a shortcut. That will hurt the Y-chromosome calculation which depends on gender. Type the following instead:

my father’s brother’s son’s son

Which is the same as:

my uncle’s grandson

Apparently, the shorter form does not lend itself to helping the software determine all genders.

March 18, 2018

Secret Baptism of Meghan Markle — #Genealogy #Royal

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19-May-2018

Mrs. Stanczyk has the date saved & is clearing her calendar.

Now details have emerged of a secret baptismal ceremony for Ms. Markle!

Baptism (& Confirmation) Date:

6-March-2018 Windsor Castle’s Chapel Royal by Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

[Religion: Anglican/Church of England]

Marriage Date:

19-May-2018 Archbishop Welby will officiate at the wedding of Harry, 33, and Meghan, 36, in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.

More Details:

https://pagesix.com/2018/03/08/meghan-markle-baptized-and-confirmed-in-secret-ceremony/amp/

March 17, 2018

Genealogy in Poland Between The Wars – Conscripts (Poborowi) – #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poborowi

Kielecki Dziennik Wojewodzki – 1933 July 25th

Well earlier (a few blogs ago, 20-February-2018)), Stanczyk, dropped his favorite meme, “Things I Found…“.  In actuality, this jester was searching for military conscript lists. I had one and needed help interpreting the data. That bit of seeking help resulted in my finding a news account of my great-great-grandfather Marcin Elijasz in an historical Polish newspaper from 1879.

I found two conscript lists (poborowi) in digitized historical newspapers from the 1930’s (Poland between the Wars era). I am struggling with what to do as the amount of data is in 2,000[1933 list], 7,328[1932 list] (9,328 total) names from both articles. After analyzing the data, what I found was:


read more »

February 25, 2018

The Other Things Found — #Historical #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

While Stanczyk was searching newspapers for military conscripts, he found many items useful to genealogy…

Today was a landholders chart for Niegosławice village, in Pacanów gmina, Stopnica powiat of 22-June-1933.

Found in Newspaper: Kielecki Dziennik Wojewódzki

Stanczyk would like to call your attention to one of his ancestors, on line 12 (Leon Wleciał).

This chart had four columns:

Line Number, Landholder(s), Plot Number, Plot area in ha (hectares).

So on Line #12 (col. 1), we see Leon Wleciał (col. 2), Plot #18 (col. 3), 6.1019ha (col. 4).

This Leon was not the Leon who came to America, but the Leon who was a witness/god-father in church records for the Wleciałowscy who came to America (and some who stayed in Poland too).

You want to search for:

Okręgowego Urzęd Ziemskiego

(Official District Land in <gubernia-name>).

September 20, 2017

Meme: #Wordless #Wednesday — Polish Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The above image is from an Alegata in support of an 1878 marriage where the bride was from out parish (Biechów parish / parafia, Kielce Gubernia, Russian-Poland; the bride was originally born in Dębica parish, Austrian Empire, Galicia Kingdom, Pilzno District, Tarnów diocese.

Baby: Marianna Czajka daughter of Joseph Czajka & Catharina Golec

Joseph Czajka son of Apolonia Czajka (Illeg. )

Catharina Golec dau. of Sebastian Golec & Sophia Bielacik

Born: 28-February-1854

Extracted: 5-January-1878 for alegata in support of 1878 Biechów Marriage Akt. 1

May 13, 2017

Genealogical Persistence in Pacanów = Serendipity in Zborówek — #Genealogy #Polish #Alegata

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1885 Zborowek Births, Akt 27

Stanczyk believes in persistence and serendipity when it comes to genealogical research. This jester believes a genealogical researcher makes his/her serendipity through that persistence, the bull-dogged determinism and hard work that yields the sweet fruit. 

Oh and after a few years of experience THEN you may trust your instincts. First learn. Learn genealogical research. Learn your family including friends and geography; understand that social network then you play your hunches and trust your instincts in the face of scant or missing data. 

As usual, I have a personal story to demonstrate what I mean. This small story is part of a larger story which is part of an even larger story. But I will start with small story and roll-up fractal-like into the larger fractal pictures (uh stories).
I was trying to find Stanislaw Krzyzycki (Stanisław Krzyżycki po polskiu), specifically his birth record in Poland in the area of my paternal grandparents (cluster genealogy / social-network-analysis). That was my goal. I had many US documents and knew a lot about Stanley and his brother Walter/Wladyslaw and their life in Niagara Falls / Buffalo NY. I also saw a soft connection to my grandparents and to a Stanley Eliasz that for years I suspected was a cousin of my grandfather Joseph Eliasz. But Stanley Eliasz and Stanley Krzyzycki remained opaque to me. I tucked them into a virtual shoe-box that I would return to. This is a part of the next larger story/goal.

On the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, in the old country, “Poland” I had a parallel situation. I had an Antoni Elijasz who was married to Katarzyna Krzyzycka. With the launch of Genbaza (metryki.genbaza.pl) I had new avenues of research to connect America to Poland. I had a couple of Elusive Stanley Eliasz/Elyasz to resolve. 

Stanley Elyasz came to Detroit from Pacanów the same as my grandfather but there was no family memory of Stanley Elyasz. Stanley Eliasz in Buffalo was even more opaque. Eventually genbaza solved both puzzles. I knew Stanley Elyasz (Detroit) was the son of Marcin Elijasz & his 2nd of three wives, Agnieszka Skwara. I also knew that Marcin Elijasz and my great-grandfather Jozef Elijasz were brothers (two sons of Marcin Elijasz & Anna Zasucha my 2x-greatgrandparents). So I finally had Genealogical proof, not just a hunch that Stanley Elyasz was my grandfather’s first-cousin. 

I also connected Stanley Eliasz to his parents, Antoni Elijasz/Katarzyna Krzyzycki and his sister, Helena through genbaza birth records. Antoni Elijasz was still opaque and as yet not drawn as a son of Marcin Elijasz/Anna Zasucha (though that is a long held hunch). So Stanley Eliasz (Buffalo) I could not yet confirm as another first-cousin to my grandfather. But I now know his parents. 

Walerya & Jozef Eliasz from 1913

Anyway, this small story is about Stanley Krzyzycki. For a long time I suspected my grandparent’s picture from 1913 was taken by a Krzyzycki in Buffalo/Niagara area. So any way the documents in the US led me to believe these NY Krzyzycki (Krzyzyckich ?) were related to Antoni’s wife, Katarzyna Krzyzycki. With the websites: Geneszukacz & Genbaza I was able to locate Krzyzycki in Pacanow & Szczebrzusz (try and get those American teeth & tongues around those Polish phonemes!!).

I found Ludwik Krzyzycki & Franciszka Sikora. Easily enough I found Stanley Krzyzycki’s brother, Walter/Wladyslaw and his birth record. I also found Aleksander Jan Krzyzycki too. But no Stanislaw. I did see a few possible female Krzyzyckich who could also be siblings too. But I focused on a marriage record for a Joanna Krzyzycka because I knew if she was a sister then she would be older and would be a bookend child (along with Wladyslaw) and I would expect Stanislaw to be born between these two children. So I persisted. I read Joanna’s marriage record and yes she was a sister of Stanley Krzyzycki. She also married a man whose family name I did not recognize. So I looked at Joanna’s husband and indeed he was born outside the parish (Pacanów). Now from long experience I knew there would be an alegata or two about Joanna & her husband (Antoni Bąk). I found that Joanna’s age indicated an 1880 birth. Ergo, she was older. I had my bookend child. What I did not expect to find was an Alegata of Joanna’s birth. Great I had her exact birthdate. But wait that meant Joanna was born elsewhere too, another parish besides Pacanow. Joanna was born in Zborówek! Zborówek is an adjoining parish to Pacanów. 

Ok now its getting interesting. First, I confirm Joanna’s birth by finding her actual birth record (Akt42) in 1880 Zborówek. Good. Now I walk forward, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, …,bingo! In 1885, (April 12th 1885), I found Stanisław Krzyżycki and this date matches some of his US records too! Wow that is persistence! Oh and the serendipity of such persistence? It turns out that Stanisław Krzyzycki’s Godfather is Antoni Elijasz. 

Wow, Stanley Eliasz & Stanley Krzyzycki are 1st cousins (not proven but a 75% likelihood by my estimate). So Katarzyna Krzyzycki & Ludwik Krzyzycki are siblings. Now I had proven a hard connection between Eliasz & Krzyzycki who came to America. 

I also have Eliasz & Krzyzycki in:
Pacanów, Zborówek and Szczebrzusz.
This can lead to many new facts (with research):

  1. Krzyzycki photographer took 1913 Eliasz photo in NY.

  2. Antoni Elijasz is a brother of my 2nd greatgrandfather, Jozef Elijasz.

  3. Stanley Eliasz (son of Antoni) is a cousin of Julian Elijasz (son of Ludwik Elijasz). I already know that their two wives are sisters from Pacanów. These two Janicki sisters are a sister and a cousin of my two Dorota Elijasz 2nd-cousins’ grandmothers!

So oddly enough I have connected Stanley Eliasz (Buffalo) to my family tree via the JANICKI affiliated family.  

I have since found more Eliasz Godparents to Krzyzycki children. Thus the Eliasz-Krzyzycki connection was further strengthened.

But that is a part of the bigger next story and my connection to Nancy Langer. Well of course, today’s story is also part of Nancy’s story and it in fact grew out of her story and my long-term virtual shoe-box. It just turned out that both Julian & Stanley Eliasz were a part of Nancy’s family and I am her affiliated family! Or are we actually related? Her trip to Poland this summer may answer that question.

That is Stanczyk’s short (longish) story on persistence & serendipity. Go make some serendipity yourself. 

April 29, 2017

Dziennik Polski (Detroit) — #Newspapers #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been very busy! A long overdue update to my Rootsweb page on Dziennik Polski has been done … more to come!

Also this jester has added 6,000 names to the Complete Index (nearly 42,000 Poles) including adding names (& relationships to deceased) listed on the Funeral Cards. The One-Step db app based on this data needs to be re-done. 

April 21, 2017

A Little Bit of Blog Bigos … — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This blog post became necessary because blog topics overran my ability to write blog posts … so here is a bit of Bigos (a mishmash) / hunter’s hodge-podge of blog topics in minature, some of which foreshadow a larger blog post (or two).

Ancestry.appAncestry released version 8.2. Security & some bugs were addressed … but the big news is image/record viewer! For a long time I despaired over the inability of the smartphone app to display the images at full resolution necessary for detailed analysis. So Stanczyk tried the image at top that this jester received from third-cousin that became a seminal document for both of us genealogists! Wow! The image viewer was great! 

In fact, I noticed a detail in the record as I was trying to detail the church record’s Polish for our shared ancestors. The image notes are below … (see Church Marriage Register)
One of the witnesses was a JAN ZASUCHA. It just so happened that I had an unfinished blog piece from mid December 2016 that was languishing in draft mode. It was upon Zasucha and how this affiliated family was related to me because my second-great-grandmother was Anna Zasucha.  So here was another example that 100 years ago the Pacanów families in America were very close and related at some level to my Eliasz/Elijasz/Elyasz/etc. family. I will finish that blog. I am hoping there is a 3rd/4th cousin in Poland with images or info about Anna Zasucha. [Editor’s Note – published Zasucha article on 20-April-2017; URL:  https://mikeeliasz.wordpress.com/2016/12/12/searchin-for-zasucha-genealogy-polish/  ]

Jennifer Holik
I also have a new blog post in progress about a new Ancestry database that was brought to my attention by Chicago genealogist, Jennifer Holik. She is an expert on Military (especially WWII) genealogy records. So she had a brief piece on US Army funerial Transport ships and I noticed the database had WWI Transports and I wondered if some Haller’s Army troops were transported via that. (Spoiler alert … yes!).


Church Marriage Register – Roza Wleciałowski & Adam Gawlikowski

Adam Gawlikowski – kawaler, 27, syn Marcina i Maryanny Lisów z Opatowiec, Kieleckie

Rozalia Wleciałowska – panna, 20, corka Maciej i Kat.  Eliasz z Pacanowa – Kiel.

sw. Marcoli Dusza, Jan Zasucha

<margin>

4)

sl. 19/8

o 9ty

Klęczu z.

— — — transcription above / translation below

Adam Gawlikowski – bachelor, age 27, son of  Marcin (Gawlikowski) & Maryanna z. Lisów of Opatowiec in Kieleckie (Gubernia of Russian-Poland)

Rozalia Wleciałowska – maiden, age 20, daughter of Maciej (Wleciałowski) & Katarzyna Eliasz of Pacanow in Kieleckie (Gubernia of Russian-Poland)

witnesses Marcoli (spelling uncertain) Dusza, Jan Zasucha

(marginalia)

Marriage #4 (of 1912) at Sweetest Heart of Mary, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan

Marriage August 19th

9pm (time)

kneeling

April 3, 2017

Polonia In Canadian Expeditionary Forces in WWI — #Genealogy #Polish 🇨🇦🇺🇸

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon



How to find government military records.

If you have a name of an ancestor who may have fought at Vimy , you should start by searching Library and Archives Canada’s online database of Personnel Records of the First World War.

The Personnel Records of the First World War database includes the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service files.

So far (1-April-2017), nearly 417,000 out of 640,000 of these full files have been digitized, with more added every two weeks.

The service files are typically 25 to 75 pages long and include records on enlistment, training, medical and dental procedures, disciplinary actions, payments, medals, discharges and deaths.

In cases where the full service file isn’t yet uploaded, you may still be able see digitized enlistment records that contain birthplaces, next of kin, addresses, religions, trades and physical characteristics.

Start by typing in the surname and hitting search on this page. Click on the name in the search results. You will likely see an uploaded image of their enlistment document that you can click on that to enlarge it.

If you also see the words “Digitized service file – PDF format” followed by a number, click on the number and the entire scanned service file will open. These files are very large so it may require a fast internet connection to download, or take minutes to appear on your screen.

For example, you can see the first nine pages of John Lescinski’s service record (top of blog). In thus case there were forty (40) pages in the accompanying PDF.

It’s not always clear in the service files whether a person served in a particular battle, like at Vimy Ridge. However, that may be found in the online database of War Diaries of the First World War, which include daily accounts of what troops did in the field. These diaries contain very little personal information, but do show where units were deployed.

Take care. It only showed my first two pages with a link to download the PDF (which actually had 40 pages).

My link (John Lescinski):

http://flip.it/hPTIUh

March 24, 2017

Polish Surnames & Their Evolution — #Genealogy #Poland

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Forysiowa

Forysiowa “seu” Pokorzonka


As this jester read earlier in the week in a European journal about an article on family names and how they change. I knew I had to blog about this name topic. 

Stanczyk wants you to know that when you read the church records, particularly the Latin paragraph form (prior to 1800) you need to look for these clues … these key words that signal name evolution:

 « alias », « seu », « vel », « genantt »,« zwany »

(‘other’, ‘or’, ‘or’ (latin), ‘called’ (ger.), ‘called’ (pol.) )

December 12, 2016

Searchin’ For Zasucha — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has the instincts of an hard-boiled detective.  Now this is not the story of forensic genealogy. Nor am I infringing on Tim Firkowski (Genealogy Assistant / Family History Detective). I guess my hard-boiled detective work stems from my reading Michael Chabon right now. 

No I am investigating / researching an affiliated family of my ELIASZ /ELIJASZ ancestors: the ZASUCHA. You see, Anna Zasucha, is my 2nd-great-grandmother and wife of Marcin/Martin Eliasz. She is a part of my direct DNA. Like in DNA, the ZASUCHA are a genetic marker for my Eliasz family of village Pacanów. Hence, my curiosity.

Now for a while this jester has noticed the Zasucha were engaged in some  chain-migration genealogy involving many families from Pacanów to the USA, including among others, my Eliasz family.

So I find Zasucha in many of the same locales as my Eliasz: 

Buffalo, Syracuse, Niagara Falls, Cleveland, Toledo and Detroit.

But there was NO family memory of ZASUCHA among my direct Eliasz family. Indeed, nobody knew Anna Zasucha was our 2nd-great-grandmother.

But I notice things and patterns and I have employed SNA (Social Network Analysis), aka as cluster genealogy before and made breakthroughs in finding out more about my direct lineage by studying these genetic markers (affiliated families) as they immigrated to the USA in a chain-migration fashion. Whole branches have been discovered. I would welcome geneslogists with:

Kędzierski/Kendzierski, Pieszczachowicz, Fras/Frass, Hajek, Zwolski, and Zasucha (all affiliated to Eliasz/Pacanów or Leszczyński/Biechów).
You will be happy I have connected back your families to those two ancestral parishes(Biechów and Pacanów) whence my paternal grandparents originated from. Indeed, I have found many 2nd/3rd and further distant cousin-genealogists via this blog’s research. However, I am still waiting on a Zasucha genealogist.

So this blog is about a lovely couple: Feliks Zasucha & Antonina Łuszcz Zasucha (both from Pacanów).
I want to end this blog with the Zasucha in my tree and pick up in the next blog article with my struggles to find data on Feliks & Antonina.


Eliasz Zasucha family tree

2nd and 3rd great-grandparents

November 16, 2016

NJ – Passaic County Naturalization Papers — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wanted to pass along a tip from Ceil Wendt-Jensen! Its a good one too:

Go to the following website:

http://records.passaiccountynj.org/press/indexPassaic.aspx
Results:


There are Declarations of Intent (shown above) and Petitions for Naturalization forms.

The images can be downloaded as PDF documents. This service is FREE!

June 15, 2016

RootsWeb Upgrade — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RootsWeb Source: THE ANCESTRY INSIDER

“We are currently working to move the entirety of RootsWeb to new machinery that can handle the load and be backed up in a consistent and reliable manner,” says Ancestry.com’s Anne Mitchell.
“Ancestry is making the switchover this week. During that time, you may notice short periods when RootsWeb is unavailable.”

Ancestry Insider believes that RootsWeb / Ancestry are making this upgrade to generate good will.

After the RootsWeb crash back in February,  the RootsWeb community, expressed themselves effectively and Ancestry is responding! When Ancestry acquired RootsWeb, they said they would keep it running.

Thank you Ancestry for keeping that promise.

Rootsweb is a very old genealogy resource that just needed some love to keep and enhance its usefulness to the genealogical community.

Stanczyk complained and apparently other Rootsweb users were also complaining that new additions to RootsWeb were not being indexed. This includes GEDCOMs uploaded to WorldConnect, Obituary Daily Times, and mail archives. This jester had to drop my trees and move to Tribalpages.

So, after this upgrade is finished, Ancestry will have fixed that. If it is indeed fixed, perhaps Stanczyk can move a family tree back.

You may have experienced some data loss the last time RootsWeb went down. That will not be happening during the outages this week, as these are planned, controlled, outages.

May 19, 2016

Romanov Russian Royalty … REDUX

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This jester has a deep appreciation for Dr. Stephen Morse and his many works, especially those related to genealogy. I have used his One Step Web Page for many years. So it was thrill to meet him at various conferences and I was touched at his kind offer to help  moje zona read her grandparent’s tombstone (alas the jester struggles with his Hebrew language skills). I have followed his recent work to make yet a 3rd generation soundex algorithm (for us Slavics).

Originally, we had American Soundex, which you still see on Immigration documents (mine is E420). Then along came the most excellent Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex which was a vast improvement for those whose heritage was Slavic (mine is 084000) and you would see it on Russian Consular records.  Recently Dr Morse has developed the Bieder-Morse Soundex algorithm which further improves name matches (by eliminating false matches). So my family name would have Bieder-Morse soundex tokens of:  elaS elas [exact match tokens only] . I think only the JewishGen website has implemented that matching.

Now Dr Morse has an article(Genetic Genealogy Revisited) in the APG’s professional journal: “Association of Professional Genealogists QUARTERLY”. It was on the use of genetics in genealogy and he used the Romanov Family mystery as a demonstration of using genetics to solve a question. Now I read in the Current issue of the Smithsonian,  the Resurrecting the Czar, article. It too covers the latest background on murder mystery of Czar Nicholas II and his family and attendants. I found that the two aritcles read together give a fascinating account of the story.

Now this jester is not a fan of the Russian Empire (even though my grandparents and their parents were born into Russian-Poland partition).  The Rus betrayal of Poland not even a century after the great  King Jan Sobieski, the Savior of Vienna [indeed all of Europe],  the “Lion of Lechistan” and  their betrayal again in 1939 at the start of World War II sour my feelings for our brother Rus. So while I enjoyed the two articles read back-to-back, I was appalled by a few “royalists” who want to bring back the monarchy to the Russian Federation. One woman artist actually is hoping for a Russian fascist (to clean up the mess??) followed by a transition back to the monarchy. That would be quite a rewind of history huh?

Czech, Lech and Rus – there is a legend of three brothers that settled central and eastern Europe. Czech went on to found the Czechs and Rus went on to found the Russians. Lech and Lechistan became Poland. So we can see again that monarchies and the battles between them are really nothing more than family squabbles done on a grand scale. By the way both articles mention the British monarchy  and their family connection to the Romanovs (via Hapsburgs).  Canute the Great was a Grandson of Mieszko I (first king of Poland) and of course another ancestor of this jester, the twice king Stanislaw Leszczynski, had a daughter marry into the Bourbons. Alas all of Poland’s goodwill and family relationships could not prevent the Deluge and Poland’s slip from History’s main stage. We will have to content ourselves that Rus and their partitions, produced Kosciuszko and Pulaski and they in turn helped to produce America.

Now we come to 2016 …

There is an artist,  Olga Shirnina, who has taken Romanov family photos and colorized them. Please read the article: RBTH (Romanov family photos in color) from “Russia Beyond The Headlines”.
Romanov Links:

Romanov Photos British Archives

Romanov Family Tree

May 16, 2016

Genealogy At Scale — 1 Million Burials

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Hart Island outside/near New York City is a 101 acre potter’s field. Since 1849 over a million people have been buried anonymously since their bodies went unclaimed or otherwise became property of city/county of NYC. 

Story from Today’s NYT. There is the Hart Island Project that tries to give voice to tens of thousands buried since 1980.

May 12, 2016

Ancestry App is Updated to v. 7.2

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry 7.2  (App Store )

download iPhone v 7.2

As the picture shows version 7.2 is 87.5 MB and newly minted.

You can download the iPhone version by clicking on the above image.

Beyond the new features, the app’s UI is more attractive in both tree and individual presentations.

April 22, 2016

Queen Elizabeth ‘s 90th Birthday — #4Gen #Picture

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


HRH, Queen Elizabeth celebrate our birthdays which are almost the same day. This year decennial celebration meant an update on the royal family from Britain’s longest reigning monarch.  So here’s two to ogle …

img_2542
The queen with her great-grandchildren by Annie Leibovitz. Such a masterful composition. It almost looks like it should be an oil painting.

April 7, 2016

Rootsweb Is Back Up … — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Rootsweb Stanczyk attended Ceil Jensen’s PARI webinar yesterday. Ceil graciously mentioned my Rootsweb page on Dziennik Polski (Detroit), a Polish historical newspaper.

I was excited for the shout-out and since I had not been on Rootsweb since it came back up, I decided a visit was in order.

Much to my horror the pages were recovered to 2013. Any work since was lost. I was able to quickly restore the current pages from my local files on my laptop. I uploaded the changed files and everything was fine. 

But I now wondered how much on Rootsweb private/user pages were not completely restored to their latest version?

Please check your pages on Rootsweb in case you may need to recover your work/research!

Tags: ,
March 8, 2016

RootsWeb Still Dead … But Signs Of Life ? #Genealogy #Cloud

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Rootsweb Returns March 15th, 2016RoostWeb estimates it will return March 15th. That is good news.

However, it being down hurt my blog website because I had links to my genealogy research that I had in RootsWeb and much of that research is over a decade ago. Now I had backups of  almost everything. That is my blog for today.

 

First off, it points out how important it is to have backups of your research. I had used RootsWeb as my cloud backup for SO LONG. So long that I had forgotten what I had up there and where it was sourced from. As it turned out, I was missing one spreadsheet. It was important in the sense that it was good data and I had even built my blog using the data from that spreadsheet as a menu item. So my recommendation here is that you have backups of everything and that you know where each copy is.

This may seem trivial, but let me point out that at this juncture, many genealogists use their CD ROM/DVD, their USB (aka thumb) drive, and even the cloud (iCloud, Dropbox, Box, EverNote, oneDrive and GoogleDrive) to backup their data from their hard drive. But what happens when your hardware is obsolete? Remember floppy drives??? Most of us are old enough to remember those removable media (in various sizes). They are gone now. What happens to your backup? It is not backed up if you cannot ACCESS the data.

So it is also true for the Cloud. This jester has a trademarked magazine, “Cloud Is Falling™“, that I started when I realized that we do not own the cloud, we only access it (perhaps for free or for a fee). So what happens if the Cloud Goes Down or a portion of the cloud no longer exists (the cloud company goes bankrupt or changes terms such that you can no longer access it)? You cannot access your research data. It is the same as hardware obsolescence. Perhaps you have heard of “Murphy’s Law” (i.e. anything that can go wrong, will go wrong) and the corollary extension: (at the worst possible time). @AmyJohnsonCrow (twitter) was using the RootsWeb outage to illustrate the need to have backup plans (as well as backed up data). 2016 had illustrated that a few times. We need only recall Ancestry.com eliminating FTM family tree software at the end of 2015. Fortunately, MacKiev has taken over developing and publishing FTM and now (as of March 4th) we have FTM and soon(??) RootsMagic that will have the TreeSynch capabilities to synch with Ancestry.com via their newly published API.

Ok, RootsWeb was out and still is down, so I rebuilt much of my Reference Data from the Menus of my blog to use another portion of the cloud instead of RootsWeb. This will give me redundancy by having the same data on two distinct clouds. I now have all my data on the hard drive now too! How did I do that while RootsWeb was still down?

That is an interesting tale. I used The Internet Archive and in particular, I used their WayBack Machine to access my RootsWeb page. Fortunately, they had made a snapshot of that page whose data I was missing and I was able to cut & paste the data back to my hard drive in a new spreadsheet! Pretty nifty huh? I hope you will enjoy my new spreadsheet which I have enhanced and even improved (i.e. corrected data). The new page: 1811_BiechowChurchRecord_births.htm  can be reached from the Menu of my blog’s home page.

March 4, 2016

FTM Is Back!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

FTM — Mac & Windows It’s here! Family Tree Maker is BACK.And its available RIGHT NOW!

FTM updates

They started with Ancestry’s FTM 2014 and FTM Mac 3 and set the focus on stability and performance improvements. Some bugs were also eliminated. The application is more responsive – you will find some actions that previously took minutes now take seconds.
New features

We managed to sneak in just a few surprises, like 100 beautiful new backgrounds you can use to make professional looking charts and reports. And we’ve integrated a service for printing high resolution genealogy charts through the good folks at Family ChartMasters. It’s a modest start, but we hope you will be happy with our new updates.
Compatibility

Mac Kiev sure that the new updates are completely compatible with the latest operating systems (Windows 10 and Mac, El Capitan). They made sure that your old trees will open seamlessly. There is nothing to move.

That your Ancestry account if you have one will continue to work with the new versions. And that TreeSync and all the other things you have come to like about FTM are still there for you.

Get The Update

What you will get and when depends on what FTM version you currently have:
1. Users of FTM 2014 and Mac 3: FREE updates are coming. They will be available in about a week or so through the software’s built-in update feature. Registered users will receive an email to let them know as soon available.
2. Users of older FTM editions: No matter how old your copy of FTM is, or whether its running on Windows or Mac, you can download an upgrade for $29.95 .
3. New users: If you have never owned a copy of Family Tree Maker before, for a limited time, you can download a full edition from their online store for $49.95 .
Family Tree Maker users who do not currently have an Ancestry.com subscription, will be offered a 14-day free trial.

If you would like a backup disc, you can purchase a CD in a jewel case for an extra $10 including shipping and handling.

Most everything you will need to know can be found on the Family Tree Maker home page:
www.mackiev.com/ftm

February 15, 2016

Presidents Day … Redux — #Genealogy #DNA

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Its been three years since my first Presidents Day blog:

https://mikeeliasz.wordpress.com/2013/02/16/
This time I wanted focus on a novel genealogical / genetic story about Presidents Day. This story comes from the Toledo Blade newspaper. One of their journalists, Tyrel Linkhorn, had a story in his family that they were related to President Lincoln. So to confirm the oral history, he used DNA!  It turns out he is related to an illegitimate half-brother of the sixteenth president.  Now that is a DNA success story. 
The full story (worth a read) is here .

February 8, 2016

Pacanów 1908 Marriages (Małżeństwo) — #Genealogy #Polish #Data

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Pacanow Marriage Metric Statistics

Pacanow Marriage Metric Statistics

 

Stanczyk has been reading the 1908 Marriages of Pacanow in order to build a spreadsheet/index of the newlyweds. There are some findings from this very preliminary set of data (1st year of data). First the men are noticeably older than the women. Men are often widowers ( and very much more so than the women). The men also frequently come from another parish. Now I collected that statistic for two reasons: (1) There will be an alegata record to document this cross-parish marriage   (2) So you can find the groom’s birth record (since it will not be in Pacanow).  I was surprised at how often the bride had come from another parish too. This data also confirms that the marriage is performed in the bride’s parish and its place is listed as the bride’s (current) village. I did find that one mother was an ELIJASZ so once again, this is an affirmation that social network analysis (SNA) can yield helpful results. In fact, I am hoping to use do a full scale SNA on Pacanow some day (1875-1908).

The spreadsheet is available to the public (and if genealodzy.pl wants it for its indexes of Geneteka/Geneszukacz then you have my permission/blessing). The spreadsheet is HERE (PDF) .

 

P.S. – One of the things I have learned is that the online indexes I have seen are incomplete (not missing). What I mean is that I have recently found data that was not present in an index that existed and I was puzzled by the omission.

 


 

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