Archive for ‘Genealogy’

September 1, 2015

INS Entry Numbers — #Genealogy #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Yesterday, Stancyk wrote about the three pieces of info that you need to request info from INS Holdings in the D. C. Archives.

I wanted emphasize the Entry # a bit more. Yesterday and today we were discussing Subject, Policy, & Correspondence Files. These are NOT the A-Files or C-Files that the INS/USCIS provides genealogy research for. These correspondence files were turned over to NARA & are in the National Archives.


The Entry#’s 1-8 — Early Correspondence

Entry#9 — INS Policy Corespondence

Entry#26 — Bureau of Naturalization Correspondence

Entry#P-4A — Central Office Files

The Subject Card Indexes in Ancestry.com are Entry#9.

These are all RG85, Entry#9. The final piece of info (File#) comes from tge subject index card. In Leon Pieszczochowicz ‘s  case it was: 55,874-84

So that is how I got my three pieces. Most people will be Entry#9 (deportation, illiterate, disease, crimes, etc. — immigration related) with some people possibly falling into Entry#26 if their correspondence is about the Naturalization (naturalization issues).

Tags: , , ,
August 31, 2015

INS/USCIS & NARA – How To Do Research — #Genealogy #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1934_LeonP_RemovalLast week Stanczyk took part in  a webinar:  An Overview of Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Records at the National Archives — by Zach Wilske.

It was an excellent webinar. It was my first genealogy webinar! The AT&T Connect that the NARA used for the webinar worked extremely well. I used the iPhone app (as opposed to the laptop software). The iPhone app work well. I heard the presenter over the phone and was able to see the slides simultaneously on the phone.  Very nice choice by the NARA/USCIS and executed well by Zach Wilske.

This jester had a goal to figure out how to research a fact from a number located on Ancestry. I found Leon in Ancestry’s:  Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952

I had found a number(s)/code :  55,874-84

Mr Wilske did a thorough job explaining the topic and out popped my answer without my even having to text a question to the presenter. I needed to go to  NARA in Washington D.C.

I also learned that you need three pieces of info: RG (Record Group),  Entry#, & File# . So what did I have and how do I research it?

 

Ah, I have a File#. What do I do with it?

This jester will be looking up (on a reference service slip, as shown above):
Leon Pieszczochowicz
RG#     85
Entry# 9
File#    55,874-84

As per Mr. Wilske, I sent an email to: cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov

to confirm the file is still extant.

August 26, 2015

Ancestry.com & Gannett Collaborate To Bring >80 U.S. Newspapers Online — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GannettAncestryDateline 24-August-2015 — Two days ago this announcement / presswire was published: here . It said that more than 80 newspapers would be digitized and brought online. Now, I am thinking this will not be in Ancestry.com, but in their other product: Newspapers.com (thus requiring you to subscribe to two offerings).

Already this collaboration has born fruit in that Cinncinati Enquirer has 4 million pages available online. Now this jester went to Gannett’s website and saw that they have 95 U.S. newspapers (not including USA Today) covering about 2/3 of  the U.S. states. Michigan, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, California, Texas, Wisconsin have at least one newspaper each. Each archive will ultimately include every available page from the first date of publication up to about 30 days prior (to the present? or the announcement?).

This jester is waiting for the Detroit Free Press (MI) and Times Recorder Zanesville (OH) where I expect to find some ancestors in the news. They do not have a Buffalo or Philadelphia paper nor are there any newspapers in Illinois, but they cover a large swath of areas where my ancestors settled.

Gannett Michigan / Ohio Holdings:

Michigan

Ohio

August 24, 2015

GenBaza Is Back ! 24-August-2015 — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenBaza Is Back 24-August-2015Dateline 24-August-2015 — GenBaza is now fully accessible again. GenPol is still not fully recovered, but at least its functionality that it provides for authenticating GenBaza allows us full access to GenBaza again!  Good Job to the tech wizards at GenPol.com


—Stanczyk

August 20, 2015

Historical Newspapers … #Australia — #Genealogy #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Trove

Stanczyk was reminded this week by Flipboard genealogy blogger Kenneth R Marks (Boost Your Genealogy Research With Newspapers) — If you have not discovered this valuable resource then by all means click the link and scan his recent articles in his curated Flipboard magazine.

This week Mr. Marks’ article reminded this jester about TROVE, an Australian Historical Newspaper (and other online documents too) website.  Now I say reminded, because loyal readers may recall my article from April 2013 (From Pacanow Poland to Birchgrove …).

I like what they have done since 2013 and it appears they have been busy at TROVE. So i encourage you to take another look for your Polish ancestor.  TIP (see picture): Use advanced search, look for online resources, search the newspapers for: Naturalization Notice, Poland and check the categories: Advertising, Family Notices to see vital record notices as well as immigration/naturalization notices. This should get your a little over 8,000  articles to search through.

Here are two images of  Polish expats who immigrated to Australia post World War II:

HenryGoldstein_Lodz

EugeniuszBalek

August 8, 2015

GenBaza is not reachable because GenPol.com is down ! #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenBaza_MainGenBaza is fine. However, there is no way to see anything other than Lodz. The reason is because GenPol.com has had a bad crash. GenPol is used as the login/authentication method for GenBaza so we cannot reach the other databases until GenPol is fixed (a couple of weeks at least).

Check back and I will update this post when GenBaza is back.


 

17-August-2015 –  A few days ago, Stanczyk noticed that GenPol.com had updated their 503 Page (Server Outage). This lets users know that the server is down and that recovery is in progress (both English/Polish). This was important so people do not think they are just gone.

GenPol_Down201508

August 5, 2015

Wordless Wednesday: Mt. Olivet (Detroit) New Section Maps — #Meme

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Thanks to a reader / contributor (Judy G.) I am pleased to mention two new Section Maps for Mount Olivet Cemetery in Detroit (Wayne County), MI.

Judy was kind of enough to send Sections P & R. These are nice quality scans too and you can click-enlarge to read the names of the individual cemetery plot names.


 

Section P:

Mt_Olivet_SectionP_Map

Section R:

Mt_Olivet_SectionR_Map

July 3, 2015

Ancestry App Version 6.6.1 — #Genealogy #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Ancestry App 6.6.1 

 Version 6.6.1 of Ancestry.com ‘s App changes the UX (User Experience) in two noticeable ways:

  1. Tapping on an individual takes you immediately to the profile (not just select and alter tree branch paths)
  2. Tapping & Holding (see top image) highlights the ancestor and allows you three options:

Edit Person, View Tree (previous function of the initial tap of prior app versions), Add Relative.

 ancestry in app store 


July 2, 2015

Sir Nicholas Winton Dies — Hero of #WWII #Genealogy #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

wintonNicholas Winton, MBE — born 19 May 1909, died 1 July 2015 . Obituary: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11711344/Sir-Nicholas-Winton-humanitarian-obituary.html  [please read]

Stanczyk took note of the passing of Sir Nicholas Winton. Sir Nicholas saved 669 children, [Complete List] from Czechoslovakia most of whom were Jewish from Nazi death camps. There are now over 6,000 living people as a result Winton’s heroism. Follow the above link to see the names / pictures of who Winton saved.

Winton died 1st-July-2015 at the age of 106. He was often called the British Schindler for his work. He might have been forgotten but his wife, Grete. She remembered a photo album of names & pictures of the children Sir Nicholas saved during the war.

His website: nicholaswinton.com lists the children and so much more from his noble life.

 

See More: [bing results]: http://www.bing.com/search?q=sir+nicholas+winton&qs=HS&pq=sir&sc=8-3&sp=1&cvid=8f5e0705da8c428a963e1354afe27ef0&FORM=QBLH


 

 

May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


 

Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:

Pacanow_16thCentury_Boundaries

The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.

Toolbar

For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.


May 16, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland — #Genealogy #Polish #History #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was combing through genealodzy.pl  (aka PTG). In their discussions they mentioned a new website with an interactive map of Poland from the 16th century. That was excellent and I will discuss it this blog article and continue in the next with examples. But I decided to see what else the website had and that is how this jester go to:

Atlas of Sources and Materials for History of Old Poland

If you see the polish language version, merely click on the British flag to see English language. This site has seven assets worth perusing and examining in depth, including the interactive map of the Polish Kingdom in the 16th century (16w).

  1. Polish Territories of the Crown in the 16th century.  Spatial Database
  2. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Kalisz in the 16th Century
  3. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Poznań in the 16th Century
  4. Religions and Confessions in the Polish Crown in the 2nd half of the 18th Century
  5. The Court Records of Wschowa, 1495-1526
  6. Register of Protestant communities in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
    in the 16th-18th centuries
  7. Parish libraries of Wiślica praeposite in the second half of the 18th century

 

This blog is primarily about Kielce wojewodztwo (or gubernia) and some surrounding areas too. So while I dutifully inform my readers who are interested in other Polish Genealogical matters or Geographical area that there are Tax Registers for  KALISZ or POZNAN. There are also a statistical record of ALL religions in the Polish Kingdom of the 18th century (very useful for classifying your ancestral parish’s congregation or identifying a synagogue location). Likewise, the register of PROTESTANT congregations in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth for 16th-18th centuries (16w-18w). This jester did not investigate the court records … yet. Lastly,  the parish libraries of Wislica is heavy Latin lifting, so while I did peruse and find some possible future gems, I will skip this too. So I will return to the 1st item in the list, the interactive map which is a treasure for all wojewodztwa (provinces/states/voivodes).

 

Here is the link (using English, clicking above link will lead to an intermediate set of choices which uses Polish map):

http://hgisb.kul.lublin.pl/azm/pmapper-4.2.0/map_default.phtml?resetsession=ALL&config=korona&language=en

You should see:

AllPoland_16w

 

Let’s type ‘Pacanów’ (no quotes, and diacriticals are needed). Since it is inconvenient to enter diacriticals, you can start typing and let the software, autocomplete for you (thus supplying the necessary diacritical). Keep in mind that this what Poland looked like in the 16th century! So that is why you see Wislica ‘District’ and the Sandomierz wojewodztwo in the pop-up box — which you should promptly close . Next we need to zoom as, all you can see is the blue-green box that represents Pacanów (not the actual text). So in the lower left of your screen is the zoom tool. Click on plus 2-3 times or drag the little slider arrow or you can do as I did and enter ‘100000’ (no quotes) into Scale field at the bottom.

You should see:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now you notice villages with green boxes (ex. Solec, Swiniary, Biechow, etc.). These are parishes that existed in the 16th century.

— — — — — — Diacritcals to Use:

ą Ćć ę Łł ń ó Śś Źź Żż

 

Next time we will examine the map further.


 

May 10, 2015

Letter From Olivier – #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Olivier, first thanks for reading/writing the blog …

I’ve been reading your genealogy blog for a year now and I’ve found some nice infomration from and a lot of good humour as well, thank you and good job.
I trying to research my in-law’s side of the family. They come from Lomza and Grajewo region of Poland, I believe it is the Podlaskie District. The names are Bruszkiewicz and Jurkowski, and Trepanowski (a cousin).

I registered with GenBaza.pl and genetyka.pl and metryki but it doesn’t look as easy as how you made it look in your blog stories to find available scans. And then when I go to the Polish State Archives, well the short of it is I don’t read Russian (and I don’t read Polish either but I can read indexes, I can’t in Russian) and I don’t know how to spell Bruszkiewicz in Russian. So when I am faced with an index or i’m looking at a page of 4 birth certificates, i don’t even know what I’m looking at.


Then I will need to find help with translations.

Do you have any tips on how to translate a Polish family name into how it would be spelled in Russian? And written by hand in a civil register?

As anyone indexed these parishes?

Any encouragements or tips would be welcomed if possible :) The whole thing feels like a brick wall!

Thank you for any help, and good job on the blog!

Best, Olivier

Ok let me see in what ways I can help you:

  1. First I am self taught in Russian and Polish from books written by William F. Hoffman and Jon Shea. So I’d recommend purchasing & reading their books, “In Their Own Words …” .  Volumes I & II.
  2. Also it is helpful to know Polish and learn the families and village names in Polish as this will help when you learn to read Russian. Translating names back & forth between Polish & Russian is more art than science.  So knowing family names  before tackling helps. Lets try a few names: Eliasz became Elijasz under Russian (1868-1918) in Russian-Poland partition. So I was expecting to see: елиашь  or элиашь but was surprised to see it as: елияшь  or элияшь in Russian/Cyrillic. So learn the Cyrillic “alphabet”  and the sounds of those letters so you can transliterate Polish/English/Latin letters into Russian/Cyrillic.  SteveMorse.org has a good English-to-Russian (and vice-versa) tool at:   http://stevemorse.org/russian/eng2rus.html

So if we try, “Bruszkiewicz”, we get (try the first one, but keep in mind that you are liable to see any below):

Брушзкивич, Брюшзкивич, Бружзкивич, Брюжзкивич, Брушжкивич, Брюшжкивич, Бружжкивич, Брюжжкивич, Брушзкиевич, Брюшзкиевич, Бружзкиевич, Брюжзкиевич, Брушжкиевич, Брюшжкиевич, Бружжкиевич, Брюжжкиевич

  1. You are correct about Lomza/Grajewo current wojewowdztwo. Both appear to be indexed in Geneteka. You can try the website: http://www.ksiegi-parafialne.pl/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=236&Itemid=331
  2. Grajewo is in Szukajwarchiwach (1890-1912): http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/5/525/0/str/1/15?sort=4&ps=True#tabJednostki . Have you read my documentation for using Szukajwarchiwach?
  3. Let’s see what “Bruszkiewicz” looks like in 1890 index in Cyrillic cursive writing: … ok I could not find Bruszkiewicz in a handful of years that I searched in both Grajewo and Lomza. Perhaps you need to verify the locale.
  4. So I went back to Geneteka and found a Bruszkiewicz in the index that I could locate online. I wanted to show you what it looks like in cursive Cyrillic:

Bruszkiewicz

 

May 5, 2015

HRH Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge — Birth Certificate #Genealogy #Royalty

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

Birth Certificate

 Today the Queen met her newest great-grandchild,  HRH Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge . The Duke of Cambridge signed the official birth certificate today. 


From earlier accounts we know that the royal baby was born at 8:34am (local time) on the 2nd of May.

April 15, 2015

Ancestry — Time For Ancestry App ? —  #Genealogy Techno#Genea 

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

ancestry app in appstore

The newest version of the Ancestry App 📱 (6.5) is here.  Genealogy on the go has reached a new level of portability for those with an Apple Watch⌚️ !

Lets see if the optimized matching is like MyHeritage or exactly what “enhanced search results” entails (more to come).

Option to delete trees within the app seems risky with touch screens. Caution would be advised and practice on a test tree before doing this for real.

 

🇵🇱 — I hope your using iOS 8.3, otherwise you may be seeing aliens (instead of iPhone, Apple Watch, Polish Flag)

 

 


April 7, 2015

Genealogy Collaboration — #Genealogy #Collaboration #Facebook

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is BIG on collaboration on genealogical research. So, let me start by thanking Donna Keicher (FB) genealogist, Western NY Genealogical Society member, etc. Thank you Donna!

Donna was going to Buffalo & Eric County Public Library (BECPL) and she graciously agreed to donate some of her research time at BECPL to helping others from outside the area in their Western NY research. Stanczyk loves RAOGK (receiving and giving) as a collaborative pursuit. The BECPL is on my wish list (again) this year to visit and do some research in. Any way, Donna was able to get me a complete death date for Frank/Franciszek Leszczynski and she sent me an image from the Buffalo Evening News newspaper from 25-JUNE-1943.

Stanczyk also did a RAOGK for another researcher by visiting Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery (Devon, PA). It was for a James Davis (1784-1852) and was through, Find-A-Grave. I took a shot of his tombstone. While there, I also did some shots that added to memorials that were missing pictures and added a few new memorials (18th century) that were missing from Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery on Find-A-Grave. I noticed an interesting tombstone (Phyllis Burr) who had a bit of a story about her slavery past. I learned a bit about Philadelphia’s abolitionists and the US Warship Ganges that rescued over 100 people from slavery (to indentured servitude/apprenticeship). Along the way, my social wife, spoke with the pastor John Loring (of The  Baptist Church in the Great Valley). The good pastor had some materials that he mailed, to this jester, about his historical cemetery and its occupants. Thank you Pastor John Loring.

Now this jester would like to hasten to add that he has done a lot of contributions to genealogy at Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz ‘s FB Group, Polish Genealogy. In particular, I like to help people with their translations or even  just reading the handwriting in their research finds from Poland. I also like to help genealogists in the group locate their ancestral parishes in Gazetteers or on current/historical  maps. Everyone is always sharing expertise,  tools or web sites to aid each other in furthering their genealogical research — this jester gets a kick out of brushing shoulders with the many talented/knowledgeable people the world over.

Let me conclude today’s blog by mentioning that ALL links today are to Facebook pages. The people & pages on Facebook have grown into a tremendous collaboration opportunity and also a learning tool as well.

March 22, 2015

530 Years After Death, Richard III Reburied

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

530 years after death, Richard III honored before reburial

Richard III finally is buried 22-MARCH-2015 in a marked grave.

Update your family trees Anglo Genealogists. 

 #AccuracyInGenealogy

Tags: ,
March 18, 2015

USA VETS — by war   #WordlessWednesday

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Fold3 has a useful Infographic …



Do not forget Polish-American vets of Haller’s Army were World War I

Tags:
March 15, 2015

Metryki.GenBaza.pl – What’s Happening in March ? – #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Parafia Michałów

Michałów

Stanczyk wanted to check-in on GenBaza and what has been going on for the old Wojewodztwo/Gubernia Kielce.

Thank You Kornelia! So here are the GenBaza updates:

2015-03-15

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parish, [sfotografowała parafię]
Michałów (1711-1904) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym].

2015-03-14

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Orthodox parishes, [sfotografowała parafię prawosławne]
Miechów (1892-1912) and also
Nowe Brzesko (1906-1908) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

2015-03-12

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Jewish congregation in, [sfotografowała parafie]
Sobków_moj (1810, 1826-1912) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

2015-03-11

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parishes, [sfotografowała parafie]
Waśniów (1890-1910) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym] and also
Wiślica Gmina (1755-1825) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

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