Archive for ‘Genealogy’

May 23, 2019

Jewish Genealogy … Especially in Philadelphia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, is an expert in Polish Genealogy, for the Gubernia / Wojewodztwo Kielce (Kieleckie). However, good this jester’s  genealogical skills are in Polish genealogy, only a limited subset transfer to research in Jewish genealogy. Acquiring the Jewish genealogical skills to research, my wife’s (Tereza Eliasz-Solomon) family is another tool in my larger  slavic genealogical skills.

But I am always learning. So here for my own edification & to aid others here are the FamilySearch catalog results for immigration on:

HIAS, Hebrew Imm. Aid Society

Title

Description
Card file of detainee immigrants,1914-1921 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society card file
I-96, 1882-1929
American Jewish Historical Society
Immigrant records, 1884-1952 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Jewish immigrant aid societies’ records of
Jewish arrivals, 1913-1947
Port of Philadelphia.
Association for the Protection of Jewish Immigrants; Hebrew Sheltering and
Immigrant Aid Society of America; Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of
Massachusetts (Boston, Massachusetts); Hebrew Immigrants Protective
Association (Baltimore, Maryland)
Landing verification cards, 1907-1914 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Pennsylvania, various records : Greens and
Browns collection
Historical Society of
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Prepaid steamship ticket record,
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1906-1948
People’s Bank (Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania); Lipschutz Steamship Company (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Ticket purchase books and index, 1899-1930 Blitzstein Steamship Company
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Ticket purchase books, 1890-1934 Rosenbaum Steamship Company
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Records, 1884-1934 HIAS (Philadelphia) Records, 1884-1934

 

NOTE:

 Some are available online, some are only available digitally at FHC  or FHL, some are only available on microfilm at FHC or FHL.

 

 

 

 

 

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May 20, 2019

Finding The Dead

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk ‘s wife, (moja żona, Tereza Eliasz-Solomon) is Jewish. Jewish genealogy is even harder then Polish genealogy … due to so much documentation being destroyed or too little remaining.

 

So I knew her paternal grandmother (Bessie Wolf). I knew of her brother Harry Wolf. I was pretty sure their father was Israel Wolf whose wife had many variations on her first name. I knew Harry’s wife’s name (Rose Itskowicz another family probably from Maramures region (modern day Romania and part now in Ukraine (Drahovo/Kovesliget). So with these tiny bits and records being added to the Internet (Ancestry, FamilySearch, JewishGen, etc.), I have been able to knit together a smallish narrative and more importantly enlarge it.

 

So I found a death certificate for Harry Wolf. I knew his wife, his birth (roughly), his death, his parents names. But I did learn his FINAL residence/address. I wrote it down (good genealogist) in the tree. I decide to look for his siblings on the basis of Wolf, died in Philly, with a father named ISRAEL. Just those bits and then proceed through each one and look at the mother’s name (for Nancy, Nessie, Gussie, etc.). 

 So I found a Samuel Wolf. I had Simon, Samuel, Max, Louis and my wife’s grandmother, Bessie. I never knew Samuel’s wife’s name. In Samuel’s death certificate, his wife precede him in death (pity, her name was needed). But he had the right parent names so I was getting comfortable. His birth location and birth date were in the tolerance for correct. So I was more comfortable. I looked at the Informant. His name was Harry Wolf. Unfortunately, Wolf is a common name in Philadelphia (Christian and Jewish families) and Harry & Samuel were common Wolf first names. Oh, the Informant’s address was there? Well what do you know it was the newly learned address for Harry Wolf (who died after his brother Samuel). So, I had reached 100% certainty now. Two death certificates juxtaposed against each other with slim tidbits of info and I had furthered my wife’s family history!

May 19, 2019

#Meme — Things I Find Whilst Searching For Other Things

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Joseph Conrad — Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski

Stanczyk does intensive research. So what do you do when you find a treasure and its not related to your search? I guess I record it (for another time) and blog about it!

So here is another in my ongoing meme, “Things I Find…”. Perhaps you already know that this jester is a bibliophile. As a genealogist, I collect stories and their authors and retell the stories in my way.

So yesterday I was combing through historical newspapers, regarding the blacksheep, Stanley Gawlikowski (aka Gawlick, alias Gawley), who met his demise most unfortunately. That is why, I was reading the Toledo Blade newspapers from August 1924. So its funny or serendipitous when others share genealogical events contemporaneously with the denizens of my family tree.

As you may have surmised, I found an article on the death of Joseph Conrad (reported as from Asthma) on 3-August-1924. And, you would be correct. I found the obituary story, plus another story about the Polish boy AND a third story about Henryk Sienkiewicz whose remains were being exhumed from Vevey, Switzerland to be re-buried in Poland. I guess technically you should record two burial events for Henryk. He now lies entombed in Warsaw’s St. John’s Cathedral (Katedra sw. Jana).

So Stanczyk did not find anything about Stanley, but found August 1924 Polish genealogical events about famous Polish authors: Joseph Conrad & Henryk Sienkiewicz.

May 11, 2019

Stanley Gawlick / Gawlik

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanley Gawlick (Gawlik)

Stanczyk almost always feels elated when you can find an image for one of your ancestors. It enhances the tree to see the person’s face. Lacking that I like to put a valuable document as the image for the person.

However, finding the only picture of someone in your tree from a newspaper article, above the fold, seems to be a bittersweet blessing to this jester. You see Stanley Gawlick is shown in the Detroit Free Press from 1927 with a few of his business associates. The bitterness is that and his associates are connected with a story on thugs/criminality (ok, bank robbery / rabuś bankowy).

So dear readers, do you have any blacksheep in your tree?

May 10, 2019

Castroregio — 1827 Marriage #Genealogy #Albanian #Italian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline: June 12th, 1827 Castroregio

Basile di Lazaro & Giovanna Donnangelo — their marriage record.

#Albano_Italians

#Skanderbeg

Stanczyk’s wife, Tereza Eliasz-Solomon, has Italo-Albano blood of Skanderbeg flowing through her veins! So it was a thrill when another Facebook genealogist passed along this marriage record for my wife’s 3x great-grandparents.

May 10, 2019

Duke & Duchess of Sussex Have A Boy❣️

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Baby, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, was born 6th-May-2019 at 5:26 (BST). He is now 7th in line to the throne.

HRH Queen Elizabeth has now been blessed with eight great-grandchildren!

🇬🇧

P.S. Uniting USA & UK ??? Where’s the USA?

May 8, 2019

Ancestry App v10.32 — #Genealogy #Software

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry updated their mobile app. The main feature is now you can view parts of your family tree on a map. So they added a 3rd “tab” at the top. It is after the  “Vertical”, “Horizontal” tree orientation, you now have a “Map” orientation of viewing your tree.

If you have NOT been thorough in your place name hierarchy, you may find a few interesting placements of events. It was easy to click on the event and correct the place name hierarchy. So it is a good thing to catch where your genealogy has been a bit sloppy. If your place name is missing or very non-standard (using an old country, ex. Jugoslavia, Czechoslovakia), then your ancestor will not appear on the map.

February 26, 2019

Chust, Xyct, Khust, Hust, Huszt … Synagogue for Kovesliget, Drahiv, Drahovo, Drahova — #Genealogy #Jewish #HapsburgEmpire #Maramaros

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Hust, Huszt, Khust, ChustThe earliest mention of a Jewish presence in Kovesliget (Drahiv) is from 1735 when there were two Jewish families. By 1746 they had been counted as 17 (5 men, 5 women, and six children). In both instances the names were not recorded.

By 1768, there were a total of 16 individuals, including: Wolva (that is, Wolf), the head of a family of four, paying the sum of 12 florins per year rent; So this is the earliest mention of Stanczyk’s wife’s family. These scant details are from:  Sefer Marmarosh; as translated by Moshe A. Davis (accessed at https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/maramures/mar270.html on 02/26/2019). Drahiv/Kovesliget was the village where they lived and the synagogue was in Chust. 

From FamilySearch – https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSK8-NS94-9?i=31&cat=231564, I found a census of the Maramaros region for Koveslegit on image 43 of 693 for Kovesligeth (starting at image 32), I found at line 104: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSK8-NSM1-H?i=42&cat=231564

I found Stryj Volvovits (Jud). It was in 1828 Census. 

When going back to Moshe A. Davis ‘s work (from above), He mentions:

62 years later, in 1830, Drahiv was already well-populated by Jews, in comparison to other neighboring villages. There can be no question that in the first third of the 19th century that there was already established in Drahiv a proper Jewish community with all of the institutions necessary for it’s proper functioning and development; that is, the triple foundation of a synagogue in which to pray and learn, a mikvah, and (to distinguish between the living and those who already have passed on) a Jewish cemetery.

This growth of the Jewish communtity of Drahiv is found recorded in a manuscript in the Hungarian National Archives in Budapest which lists the names of 18 heads of Jewish households from Drahiv, totalling 99 individual family members. A photocopy of this manuscript exists in the University of Tel Aviv (Muller Collection). The names listed are as follows (the numbers in parentheses is the number of individuals in each family):

Isaac Hofman (8, including a Jewish servant);
Barko Shimonovits (7);
Yanko Leibovits (10);
Mendel Zelikovits (3);
Moshko Hershkovits (6);
Sruli (=Yisroel) Wolfowitz (4);
Marko Shimonovits (10);
Folk Leibovits (4);
Yecheskel Davidovits (3);
Tzala (=Betzalel?) Davidovits (7);
Marko Sheyovits (9);
Chayim Sheyovits (3);
Pinchas Chaimovits (4);
Moshko Leibovits (4);
Hillel Leibovits (6);
Shlomo Gedaliyovits (6);
Itzko Hershkovits (3);
Shimon Itzkovits (2).

I see Sruli Wolfowitz in this 1830 census. Sruli is I am confident the same Stryj Volvovits from 1828. So perhaps Sruli/Stryj/Israel is the earliest forbear from which we have a full name.

 

Now these Wolva/Volvovits/Wolfowitz are all the same family and I am afraid you will have to take my word for it right now. I will be offering a further genealogical proof from US records (ship manifests, tickets records, HIAS records, etc.) that will make the case for these names being the same family who came to  Eastern PA (and some on towards Cleveland). My interest is in my wife’s family who settled in Philadelphia as the WOLF family (a common name to be sure).

 

 

February 21, 2019

Serendipity Continued … — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Alegata page 1

Alegata page 1

Alegata page 2

Alegata page 2

Stanczyk, wanted to discuss further the serendipitous alegata found last time.  So the two page alegata needed translating. So I translated the pertinent parts from Polish & Russian as shown below …


Akt 11 1887 (Alegata)

Gubernia Kielecka

Uezd Stopnica

Parish Biechów

It happened in Biechów the 31st day of January 1864 at 5 o’clock in the evening. He appeared Józef Leszczyński, the townsman, wheelwright who lived at the Inn, age 20 (=>b. 1844) , with witnesses, Maciej Kopra, age 46 & Wojciech Fortuna, age 50 of Piestrzec who presented a female baby born in Piestrzec on the 30th of January, this year at 5pm to his wife, Agnieszka zd Godowska age 19, given two names, Marianna Apolonia , the godparents were, Marcin Major Of Piestrzec & Julianna Leszczynska of Biechow

Biechów 26th January 1887

Father Michał Królikowski


Well that was some excellent serendipity. I not only got my 2nd-great-grandfather (Marcin Major), but the godmother is my great-grandfather Tomasz’s first wife (Julianna Leszczynska nee Kordos). I also decided that the father, Jozef Leszczynski was the wheelwright (carter) living at the Inn in Piestrzec (aka Piersciec). The Inn owned by his brother (?) Tomasz Leszczynski.

So I went and added Jozef Leszczynski & his wife Agnieszka Godowska and their 10 kids to the family tree. As a result of that work, I also found that Jozef later on (1879) owned his own Inn in Szydlow. This is very interesting as it appears that my Leszczynskich were, if not a szlachta/magnate family, at least fairly well off. This confirms other family lore about owning a mill.

January 30, 2019

Columbus Was Polish — A Genealogical #Book Review

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk’s readings have converged. I was reading the book in picture, by author (historian, researcher), Manuel Rosa. This topic has re-occurred, quite a few times. My blog articles on whether Columbus was Polish are here:

Columbus: The Untold Story

Christopher Columbus Discovers … He Is Polish  [12/02/2010]

Wladislaw III, Father of Columbus?  [12/27/2010]

Cristobal Colon Discoverer Formerly Known As Columbus is Noble Born Polish [3/26/2013] 

Columbus’s Author Rediscovers America  [12/18/2014]

Columbus is Polish, Who Knew? [4/7/2016] 

There were a few other references in my blog beyond those. I even traded a few emails with the author too! So I guess I am obsessed with this topic.

Today’s blog originates because I was reading Manuel Rosa’s book and I was also looking a wikipedia article about early Poles in America.  In the wikipedia was one Franciszek Warnadowicz who arrived 1492??? Warna as in Battle of Varna/Warna and owicz as in: of, from, or connected with. So we have Franciszek who is of/from/connected to Warna. Franciszek moved/lived in Cadiz, Spain. According to materials Franciszek or his son Franciszek/Francisco was enrolled as a member of Columbus/Colon’s crew in 1492. Franciszek Warnadowicz has the dubious distinction of being the first European to die in the Americas (at Hispanola).

 

 

So my book review ensues…

I was reading “Columbus: The Untold Story“, by Manuel Rosa.  The book has 17 chapters & an Epilogue spanning 325 pages. It also has an appendix and a Notes Section that is 12 pages of very interesting citations/notes. So this is no fluff book. It has stretches that are a bit pedantic but over all the author conveys how he reached his conclusion that Christobal Colon was Polish and was in known as Wladyslaw IV a Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth noble (Jagiellonian Line).

 

Mr. Rosa is trying to overturn five centuries of misconceptions, with his thesis that Wladyslaw III, survived the Battle of Varna 1444. History built a tomb for Wladyslaw III and named him Wladyslaw Warnensi (or Warneńczyk). So when I saw that Christobal Colon had a Polish crewman named Franciszek WARNAdowicz with him in 1492. I had an Eureka  moment. Suprisingly this historical footnote was missing from Manuel Rosa’s anecdotal arguments in the book, as I think this is another circumstantial argument that supports the author’s claim!

The book has lavish illustrations and pictures to accompany the author’s text. The narrative while not always exciting, is at least compelling. But as a genealogist, Chapter 17 (Son of The Hermit King) was all I really needed to see. Genealogy is History for this jester. I agree he needed to make the detailed and well researched arguments of the the first 16 Chapters and I understand as a Portuguese native these are the compelling part. I mean honestly how could the Polish family, under its pseudonym (double pseudonyms) have such privilege if Columbus were a commoner? He makes the excellent argument of the names (pseudonyms) and the secrecy required by both Wladyslaw III and his son(s) to remain safe. These were marriages of nobles, educated nobles. Poles, Portuguese, Spaniards. They were all royals!

Many Chapters are focused on Spain & Portugal and they too include genealogies and histories. So if you you are Spanish or Portuguese then these first 6 Chapters will be of interest (really the whole book). It is after all Portuguese-centric. The early books were in Spanish, Portuguese, and Polish. So this jester was glad they got around to an English translation. The book is filled with symbols and their decoding. It’s kind of like a real live, Dan Brown tale. There was also an argument about distances and the mathematics and I being an engineer loved that discussion. The double-swapped identity to protect Wladyslaw (III & IV) from the Ottomans or Muslim assassins was a bit beyond Occam’s Razor. I would have loved to see some work on Wladyslaw IV’s brothers and their genealogy. Also, with all of the Genetic Genealogy, why has no Jagiellonian DNA been tested against Christobal Colon? The book seems to rule out Italian ancestry via DNA, but what holds back the Polish confirmation.

 

Still I believe Christobal Colon was Polish and a noble. But belief is not proof. Manuel Rosa, get some Polish DNA to prove Christobal Colon was Polish. The Slavics have distinctive haplotypes. It should be easy to determine if he’s Polish/Lithuanian (as any Jagiellonian would be) and he has done enough to prove nobility from circumstantial evidence. I do so love the era of #Genetic #Genealogy!

 

P.S. 

I am now reading a book on Colon’s last voyage (the Vizcaina), so I hope to get more info about Warnadowicz.

December 15, 2018

Alegata Surprise

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Piotrkowski Gubernia

Bendin Uezd, Piotrkowski Gubernia

In the marriage of Wladysław Fras & Agnieszka née Leszczyńska Michniewska, Stanczyk found an unusual section of text not present in most marriage records.

Wladysław was born in Bendin uezd, Piotrkowski gubernia (south-west corner of map). So his ability to marry in the church needed to be verified with a birth/baptism (one alegata purpose).

From the marriage, I found an odd and difficult section of text to decipher (as if all old Russian/Cyrillic cursive handwriting were not enigmatic enough).

From this odd section, if I understand correctly, three things are made known:

  1. They could not locate Wlad’s birth metrical record in Uiejsce, Wojkowice Koscielne parish, Piotrkowski Gubernia.
  2. Wlad had an urgent requirement to serve in the army.
  3. Wlad’s mom & four witnesses had to attest to his birth on February 10th (after marriage performed January 26th, and before it was recorded February 12th).

So it appears the attestation was good and the marriage was good. Sadly, I never found Wlad’s birth record and my hope was to get it as an alegata at this marriage (I had his siblings’ birth, just not Wlad’s). Dad was dead. Mom attested. Now I wonder who the four witnesses were? Let’s see: Witness1, Witness2, the performing clergy, and ??? Perhaps the godfather was the fourth or the church organist [so many organists in my church records]. Alas, no record of the four witnesses or attestation. I have Wlad’s birth year (derived from age at marriage and fits between two siblings’s births) and that will have to do.

An interesting marriage record! So I ask you, “Do you have any military grooms that needed a quick marriage before shipping out to the Russian (|Prussian|Austrian) army?”   If so, please post a comment or email this jester.

Fras + Leszczynski

Akt 5 – The Full Marriage Record (left side)

December 12, 2018

Alegata Question – 26-Jan-1890 Marriage Of Wladyslaw Fras & Agnieszka Leszczynska

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The last time we saw the record, Akt#5 in Solec 1890 Marriages bewteen Wladyslaw Fras & Agnieszka Leszczynska.

This is minus one unusual section that is hard to translate/understand.

Here’s an abridged translation:

It happened in Solec on 31-Jan/12-Feb 1890

Witnesses:  Jan Majczak 39 of Piestrzec & Jan Biernik of Kikow age 40

Groom:  Wladyslaw Fras bachelor, 32 in army born in Uiejsce, parish Wojkowice Koscielne, Bendzin uezd Piotrkowska gubernia residing in Kikow, parish Dobrowoda living with mother , Jan (father deceased) & mother Marianna née Bielasinska;

<additional text goes here>

to

Bride:  Agnieszka Leszczynska Michniewska widow of deceased Jozef died 1 year ago; age 23 born in village/parish Biechow & residing in Zwierzyniec, parish Solec daughter of Tomasz & the deceased Julianna Kordos legally Leszczynskich

3 banns:

read in Dobrowoda & Solec parishes on 31-Dec/12-Jan, 7th/19th Jan, 14th/26th Jan this year

The image is in my last blog post below 👇🏻.

 

Now given the above: Groom born elsewhere, Bride born elsewhere, Bride widowed, I would expect … about 4 pages of alegata to include Wladyslaw’s birth record, Agnieszka’s birth record, Agnieszka’s 1st husband’s death record and the image at the top of this blog post. But the reality is that I only received the image at the top.

 

Does anyone know why? Email or comment on the blog please.

 

My Guess

Agnieszka’s husband died in this parish and the death was last year (1889). I did confirm that the death record did exist in the parish (Solec) books for 1889 Deaths. Ok, the priest did not feel the need to include an alegata for the death. Agnieszka born in Biechow and now living in Zwierzyniec made her a known entity in the parish, even though she was born in Biechow and she married 1st husband (Jozef Michniewski) in Biechow. So the priest did not feel the need for her birth alegata either; Especially since she and her 1st husband had two kids and they were baptised and living in Solec. But what about Wladyslaw?

 

He was not just born in another parish. His parish was in another gubernia too! Why no birth alegata for him? Tomorrow, my guess about the puzzling text that was unusual in most marriage records. Also another question too!

December 11, 2018

New In Genbaza & Genealodzy (Metryki) — #Polish #Genealogy #Online #Databases

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Fras + Leszczynski

Akt 5 – Wladyslaw Fras & Agnieszka zd. Leszczynska Michniewski

Christmas came early for Stanczyk this year. The metryki at Genbaza & Genealodzy were updated.  This jester was able to find the second marriage of my great-grandfather’s daughter (not my grandmother, her half-sister, Agnieszka Leszczynska Michniewska Fras)!

 

At Genbaza they added Solec Zdroj (1875-1913). At Genealodzy they added Stopnica (1875-1917) to the Busko powiat. Now Stopnica was already at Genbaza, but Genealodzy added the years 1910-1917 on top of what Genbaza already had.

So I’ll be busy searching through the end of 2018! Next time, a question about the Alegata for the above marriage record.

October 22, 2018

Genealogy, Genetic Genealogy & Politics — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genetic Genealogy proves claim!         Elizabeth Warren’s claim proves true

Stanczyk has seen a lot of genealogy. But in the last six years or so, genealogy has really become a big part of every day life & even the news. This is because it is one of the most popular hobbies (2nd to gardening), the new media shows on genealogy, genetic genealogy, and politics!

This bit of genetic genealogy seems to stir the American melting pot quite a bit. So, as a result this jester has felt the need to unpack this story and add my own opinion too.

This story became a big deal because Donald Trump (then a candidate) called Elizabeth Warren, a denigrative slur of, “Pocohontas”. He even went so far as to offer her a Million Dollars if she tested her dna and proved her heritage claims. Ms. Warren’s dna was tested by Carlos Bustamante, a well-regarded Stanford University geneticist. Impressive! The report said Ms Warren had 10 times more Native American ancestry than the reference set from Utah and 12 times more than the set from Britain. So contrary to @GOP snide remarks, Ms. Warren does indeed have more indigenous people dna than the average European descent American. Indeed this jester and my entire direct lineal tree has ZERO indigenous people DNA (unless an American Indian reverse migrated back to south-Central Poland. Now this should not have been surprising since Elizabeth Warren was born in  Oklahoma and in OK, more than 7% of Oklahomans have some American Indian ancestry (a fact that is NOT surprising since so many tribes are located in that region of the country).

Now there is a fair amount of acrimony on all sides. American Indians do not like someone claiming American-Indian ancestry unless they register with the actual tribe(s) they are from. They especially grate when Americans use that ancestry to get a leg up in the non-reservation area of American society. They see that a heritage their ancestors earned for those enrolled in one or more tribes. Similar to how most Americans feel that their ancestors fought in wars for this country and built up this country from a backwater European colony to a world power. Their American heritage was earned over the decades, possibly over a century or two. Same for American Indians who were here before Europeans, proper, colonized this continent and displaced the indigenous peoples.

Now from Elizabeth Warren’s side we see a vindication of her heritage. Her family genealogy, including the family lore of an American Indian ancestor was proven by genetic genealogy! So, she must have felt that Trump’s misogynistic slur was refuted and indeed she claimed the $1Million dollars for an American Indian women’s charity. Not only was the slur a slap against women, it was a shameful burden imposed on all of America when Trump called her Pocahontas from the @Whitehouse in front of American-Indians on TV! So this slur was doubly slurring of women (Ms. Warren in particular) and of American-Indians. Indeed if you read the newspaper account (in the pic at the top), American Indians felt doubly slighted. Now it was not Ms. Warren’s heritage claim (using what they felt was their heritage, since she was not enrolled), but now the President of the United States was using a racial slur that was demeaning to the indigenous people of this continent in front of them, on TV, in the “People’s House”??? Trump of course wants to maintain the misogyny and welch on his pledge  (has he ever done that before? YES!) to save face and bolster himself with his fanatic base. So Trump and indeed, the GOP made light of her 6th-10th generation ancestor (or ancestors) proven claim for political purposes. This of course, rankled many genealogists, including this jester.

After all, the GOP have maintained their lunatic belief of birtherism (anti-Obama) probably rooted in their racism. Indeed Donald Trump (and his wife) are the main propagandists still clinging to this long disproven idea. Indeed, you can read the proof in THIS blog. One should be surprised by Trump doing this when his own grandparent was deported from Germany for not serving in Germany’s military (a family trait apparently). Or perhaps his 3rd wife’s violating her visa terms prohibiting working in the USA to work in the USA. Under her husband’s regime she would have been deported as a criminal for violating her visa. But his/her lawyers got her citizenship under the “Einstein” visa (as if she was exceptional in any way like Albert Einstein). Her family then used her ill-gotten citizenship to do chain-migration immigration and naturalization against what the President rails against in those who are not related to him by marriage. So even genealogists love our hobby and its discipline resent politicians trying to abuse their hobby to harm others. Most genealogists have family lore: a long-lost royal lineage, an undocumented historical figure, a blacksheep figure of some reknown (eg. Jesse James). These may take years or decades to prove. Perhaps genetic genealogy may break down some new walls. But we don’t denigrate other genealogists who tell these family stories. We may smirk and say, inside our heads, good luck proving that. Genealogical Proof is a hard thing; But if the courts accept dna proof and genealogists use dna as a valid technique to connect family trees, and genetic genealogy is now used to solve cold-case crimes, then maybe its time the GOP/President accept this proof and stop denigrating women and American Indians and stop welching on their pledges!

To us genealogists, Elizabeth Warren proved her claim! Now pay up Donald Trump. I don’t expect that, but maybe you could and should shut up if you cannot man-up and pay your bets (debts)!

October 5, 2018

Genetic Genealogy & Polish Family Tree

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, like most family historians is proud of his heritage and research. Today’s pics are just a small part.

Martha – via Siwiec, Wojtys, Lewinski, Eliasz

Jon/Jan – via Marzic, Zasucha, Eliasz

The two pics represents two wings of this jester’s family tree.

This jester does not employ genetic testing for a variety of business/legal reasons.

However, now twice genetic genealogists have used my tree to solve their genetic mysteries.

Now this jester has maintained that the people (osob) of Biechow, Pacanow, Zborowek, Szczebrzusz, Olesnica, Stopnica, Beszowa, Swiniary, Solec(-Zdroj), and Dobrowoda parishes (parafia) including their surrounding villages are inter-related.

So I have been only too happy to work with other genealogists. Genealogy is easily the best suited field of study for crowd-source solutions and collaborating on family tree & histories. My feeling is that I am helping others who are connected to me and through our mutual research we will discover those connections. Indeed that is the raison d’etre of this blog. Its meant to be a cousin magnet. I have benefited as much as the other genealogists. Sometimes I get pictures of distant cousins, sometimes pictures of myself or my father or grandmother that I did not know existed (and obviously did not have). Often I get get new avenues of research in branches that were long lost.

Back to the pictures. John Marzic (right pic) is a person from an affiliated family of an affiliated family (Zasucha). I worked with a genetic genealogist, Kathy G. and we found her cousin’s cousin who was adopted as child and we found his birth family. John Marzic turned out to be the missing father and through extensive testing of many people not shown, the genetics provided the info to connected John Marzic to myself. I did not even know John’s son’s name, just that he grew up Michigan and was connected to Pacanow (my grandfather’s birth village) and might be related to a Zasucha. Remember a blog “Searchin’ For Zasucha”? It and a few other Zasucha blogs drew Kathy’s attention. We worked together, me using geneteka and genbaza and aiding on the USA side in odd bits here and there. Kathy did the suspected families (from Pacanow to Niagara Falls(NY) to Albion(MI) to Nevada). She did the genetic testing of the probable branches and we succeeded. I did NOT know her “cousin’s cousin, the adoptee”!

The left picture shows a FB genealogist who worked with me to connect our trees! Martha had so many wide branches I had no idea of. Through her I even found Eliasz that I did not know of connected to her ancestors (through marriage). We did connect our trees. I like to add the branches leading to the genealogists connected to me. So I was surprised when Martha messaged me recently about a SF person who was highly connected to her genetically (long cm strands and many strands). Martha started describing to me and I knew at once she was connected to my Marzic/Zasucha branch (so yet another path to Martha and me). They are at far branches and yet they are connected via genetics. But it was my branches (and I suppose my untested genetics too) that connected them. Through her MRCA numbers from her to him & vice versa (slightly different 3.4 generations & 3.6 generations), I was able to count up my tree from her and from him and tell her the most likely branches she needed to pursue. In her case it was her Lewinski branches & Wojtys branches (oddly enough not the Eliasz nor the Zasucha).  Counting back from John Marzic (or really his son) I ended up at Lewinski & Wojtys the same as for her. The Eliasz & Zasucha are merely stepping stones between these two families. Kathy G, if you are still reading my blog, then look at Martha (left pic with arrow). Her DNA is up on some genealogy website(s). Your cousin’s cousin has another set of family branches to add to his tree.

By the way, Martha & Kathy, I have a friend, Louis Kessler who is a genealogist, blogger, & a programmer who does genetic genealogy. He has some excellent dna triangulation software  on his website.

August 25, 2018

Swiniary — What Genealogy Resources Are Available #Genealogy #Polish #Kielce #Gubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Świniary is an important parish to Stanczyk. The reason is because the earliest mention of an Eliasz from Pacanow is found in Swinary parish marriages in the year, 1797. This jester has written two articles on this:  1797 Marriage in Swiniary parish, Jakob Eliasz  and Jakob Eliasz, The 1st Pacanow Eliasz .

Now I wondered why Swiniary is NOT in Metryki.genbaza.pl (AP Kielce) only in the AD (diocessan archive). So I went to FamilySearch.org catalog  (Swiniary – Busko). There were two listings:

Author: Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja Świniary (Busko Zdrój)

Księgi metrykalne, 1668-1865

Author: Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja Świniary (Busko Zdrój)

Use @ FHCUnfortunately, you need to be at FHC or FHL (Salt Lake City) to use the digital records for Swiniary.

Luckily for this jester, a Marlene Hardman (Polish genealogist) was a volunteer for her local FHC and she graciously provided this blog with the images of the indexes for 1878-1884. So I will be updating this blog at some point to link to their location on a public Google Drive in the cloud for those who also wish to have a look for an ancestor of theirs. Bless Marlene for RAOGK to this jester!

If the folks over at Geneszukacz would like me to index these indexes for their online database, I would love to pay it forward and provide such. Just let me know!


Resources:

  1. Genbaza — Świniary (1668-1865)
  2. FamilySearch.org (1668-1865, 1878-1884)
  3. Pradziad — Świniary (catholic, 1875-1913, in Archiwum Państwowe w Kielcach¹
  4. Parish (Parafia)  St. Stanislaw (sw. Stanislawa) —  (Birth 1860– Present?, Marriages 1885– Present?, Deaths 1880– Present?) [Source: parafie.genealodzy.pl]
  5. SzukajWArchiwach.pl online archive for AP Kielce (only metadata, no scans, for Swiniary)
  6. Swiniary Parish via Diocese (info, history)

¹ – Archiwum Państwowe w Kielcach
25-045 Kielce, ul. Kusocińskiego 57
tel: (41) 260-53-11 lub 17
fax: (41) 260-53-10
email: kancelaria@kielce.ap.gov.pl
http://www.kielce.ap.gov.pl/

July 26, 2018

Rootsweb … Still Dead 💀 but Coming Back — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, is impatient. But Rootsweb has been down a LONG time! I see you have noticed by my logs (going to Dziennik Polski App, etc.).

So this jester decided to see where they stand. This is what I found out…

Mailing Lists are sort of back. But you need to create a new login. Do you have to resubscribe to your mailing lists again? Who knows? I tried to create a new login, but their service was not available.

The Rootsweb Wiki and Ancestry Wiki are now the same?? That functionality does work.

Obituary Daily Times also works, but it feels different and you go to a site: http://sites.rootsweb.com/~obituary/

that looks different from rootsweb. Still the data seems as before.

Hosted Websites, the free web pages provided by rootsweb are NOT back. But they are bringing back the approximatrly 600 USGenWeb pages first , before the user pages. That sound encouraging. You can request they restore your website. They have a form you need to fill out to make that request. This jester requested his stuff (7/26/2018). They also provide a mechanism to download your website assets. It says it will take 2-4 weeks to zip up your website and send it to your email associated with the rootsweb account. Hmmm? What happens if because of their security problem you had to get a new email? I do NOT know. Request your zipfile here.

Family Trees / World Connect , they are trying to figure out how to upload and host GEDCOM files SECURELY. So its not back yet either. They appreciate your patience.

 

Well there you have it! That’s why some of my links do not work. I’d request your website be recovered or to download it if I were you.

Tags:
July 23, 2018

#Ancestry Widget for iPhone — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry widget for iOS/iPhone

Genealogy Today:

Mary Eliasz (Elijasz) Gronek died 1976

Stanley M. Sobb (Sobieszczanski) married 1949


 

July 17, 2018

Alegata Stamps – #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Link:

 

http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,detail,95466,26

From Stopnica parish, 1923 Alegata book

 

I think 5,000 Marks (Marek). Some stamps were tucked into page crease on the image. But, this is surely a record # of stamps (if not the actual amount).

 

Whoops I wrote too soon, the back of 2nd page was loaded with stamps (2nd picture on right), 32 more at 50 Marks each = 1,600. So that makes a grand total of 6,600 Marks!

 

I did find a 30,000 Mark alegata (thankfully s/he used 5,000 & 3,000 Mark stamps for that Marriage bann alegata.

 

 

 

 

 

July 9, 2018

Prince Louis has God Parents ❣️ — #Genealogy #Royal

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Prince Louis son Prince William

Prince William has named the God Parents for his son Louis’ baptism.

The six God Parents are:

  1. Nicholas van Cutsem
  2. Guy Pelly
  3. Harry Aubrey-Fletcher
  4. Lady Laura Meade
  5. Hannah Carter
  6. Lucy Middleton
July 7, 2018

Florida, Passenger Lists, 1898-1963 — #Boleslaw #Wlecialowski #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

 

 


Stanczyk is constantly learning & relearning genealogy. I realized I wanted/needed a WWI draft registration that was updated and clearer. Well I logged in to the database (Ancestry). Instead of putting my ancestor’s name in (often misspelled) I thought I’ll use a wild card search: ” W?ecial* “. I wanted to get back: Wlecial, Wlecialowski and the many permutations of bad spellings and mistranscriptions. Oh, I got those alright. I also found a database I had never queried before because my ancestors settled in the Great Lake States (Michigan, Ohio, New York, Illinois, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Indiana; none in Wisconsin) for the most part. So I completely ignored the database: “Florida, Passenger Lists, 1898-1963”. So I was caught off guard when Boleslaw Wlecialowski was arriving 7th-March-1926 at Key West,Florida from CUBA???

You see, Boleslaw (or Bill or William) really arrived in 1910 from his father and went to Cleveland to his uncle Jan Elijasz (my great-grand-uncle came to the USA???, possibly a language problem and it was his cousin Jan Elijasz). At any rate, Boleslaw was in Niagara Falls in 1912 when his sister Rosalia arrived. The Wlecial/Wlecialowski quickly moved to Detroit in 1912. Boleslaw volunteered to fight in Haller’s Army (yes, he was registered for USA Army in WWI Draft too). He fought in WWI apparently went from France to Poland and fought the Bolsheviks before returning in 1920 on 7th July 1920 from Danzig according to “U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939“; Yes the USA paid part of the costs of the returning US citizens who fought in Haller’s Army. At any rate, this 1920 year was used on the Immigration forms (not the 1910 year). So I had his Naturalization Papers too. In fact,  I had Detroit City Directories and knew he was in real estate in the 1920’s. So the ONLY new fact I had was he returned to the USA  in 1926 after spending 3 days in Havana Cuba in 1926!

Wow! Why was my father’s uncle in Cuba in 1926? Well it turns out that Cuba in the 1920’s was a thing, … a big thing! In the Roaring 1920’s money was plentiful and Americans luxuriated in Cuban resorts. I assume to enjoy the posh life, drinking, gambling, etc. I guess Boleslaw had some discretionary income before the Great Depression. Of course there was that Volstead Act (a follow-up to 18th Amendment) that prohibited alcohol. So I guess going to nearby Cuba for a drink was viable even for Polish-Americans.

I learned/relearned: use wildcards (especially for my earliest ancestors, whom I thought I already had everything), rescan new databases (even if you think they don’t apply) and do so periodically for newly added data.

Oh, this was a two page manifest. Be sure sure to check forward AND backward one page for the complete data.

June 9, 2018

Part 3 of Alegata As Time Machine — #Polish #Genealogy #Russian-Poland #Partition #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Biechow 1878 Alegata - Page 12 of Alegata for Marriage 15Stanczyk, welcomes you to the third part of this multi-part Alegata As Time Machine series. As the title suggests this is the third part.

Parts 1 & 2 can be reviewed below:

  1. Alegata As Time Machine — I
  2. Alegata As Time Machine — II

There have been some prior alegata articles (in case you are binging):

  1. 1878 Marriage – Russian Empire bride + Austrian Empire groom
  2. Another Alegata Article
  3. Clever Use Of Alegata

Today’s article is we are going to dissect a typical article and see what we can expect to find. In the fourth part we will look at many sample portions to see the type we might encounter.

First off, be aware that you can click on the images to see larger version of the images to see the fine details. Second, let me remind you, dear reader, that alegata are mostly found in Russian Poland partition but the general knowledge still holds, though the year and the partition may dictate a different language. In this series we will see Russian/Cyrillic, Polish (Latin alphabet), and Latin (the actual language) among the samples. In fact, you may see more than one language in an alegata.

1878 Alegata dissectedToday’s alegata is about the bride who was born outside the parish who is now living in the local parish (Biechów). So the bride is proving she was baptised to marry in the local church.

Let’s look at the various pieces and derive their meaning in this common sample.

Number (1) — It is in Russian. Its meaning is, “Record (akt) # 121, RZEGOCIN”. This margin note ties the data back the Ostrowce parish (in Kielce gubernia, Grotniki gmina). We will see the event type and the year of the remote record in a bit.

Number (2) — Do you see the light, pencilled, “12”? That is what the second bullet pertains to. This “12” indicates we are on the 12th page of alegata. The left side of the image is page 11 and the right side is page 12. The left side, is usually, the back of the prior page’s text.

Number (3) — The top header text, relatively bold in ink is Russian text indicating this is an alegata for an 1878 marriage, the akt #, in the local parish’s 1878 marriages. For the record we are looking Biechow parish (Kielce gubernia, Stopnica gmina), 1878 Alegata book on page 12 (this image).

Number (4) — The fourth part, we are calling out is the record # (akt #) that this alegata is for. In this case it is for Marriage Akt 15, in Biechow parish Marriages.

Number (5) — The fifth bullet is the top of the remote record. It indicates the event type from the remote parish that this alegata page is about. In this case we are looking at a birth record. In Russian/Cyrillic, “рождение” (birth).

Number (6) — The final bullet, (6), is about the birth record (in Polish) and more specifically, the year of that record, which in this case is 1861. Now this is fortuitous because, the online births end at 1859. So for birth years 1860 and forward you would normally have to write to the parish (Ostrowce, św.Jana Chrzciciela) to get this birth record.  At the bottom of the record is the date:

Ostrowce, 4/16th day of August, 1878 (the date this record was extracted from that remote parish’s books).

One final note. Did you notice that the birth was written in Polish (not Russian)? If the remote event record was before 1868 then it will be in Polish. Galicia records are in Latin.

To see the Alegata side-by-side with the Marriage record click on “Continue reading”

read more »

June 4, 2018

Alegata As Time Machine — Part 2

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

I wanted to show the availability of alegata in parishes that were in or nearby my ancestral parishes. So the table below shows how common (or rare) alegata are.  They seem to range from about 1813 (before Napoleon’s final defeat, and the subsequent formation of Congress Poland / Russian-Empire Polish partition). The 1813 I saw was in Polaniec (and is not shown in the table below). The latest as we see in the table below is 1923. There may be more after that year but perhaps privacy rules prevent their being published until later. So we have about 110 year range to view alegata.

The time machine aspect comes into play because the alegata are recorded in the year they are for. The actual request may have been in 1989 and the earliest year for which the alegata gets data is 1720. So the time machine spans 269 years while the alegata only cover 110 years. So we are gaining 100 years on the early side and 66 years on the later side. While this time span is not complete (i.e. not everybody’s data is shown, it is extraordinarily helpful to those whose ancestor does have an alegata in reference to. Hence, why I call it a time machine. We might see a request from the 1950’s for a record in late 1800’s in an alegata book dated 1901. In some cases (particularly the earlier years), we may find a record that was subsequently lost, but due to an alegata request, it was saved in duplicate and thus preserved for some lucky genealogist even though the original book may have been lost/stolen/burned.

Parish Alegata Available (nearby parishes)

Parish Year Range Parish Year Range
Biechow 1875 — 1882 Opatowiec 1887
Biechow 1884 — 1893 Pacanow 1875 — 1897
Biechow 1895 Pacanow 1899 — 1905
Biechow 1897 — 1901 Pacanow 1907 — 1908
Biechow 1904 — 1908 Stopnica 1875 — 1878
Busko 1912 Stopnica 1887
Busko 1914 Stopnica 1889 — 1892
Busko 1916 Stopnica 1894 — 1897
Dobrowoda 1875 — 1894 Stopnica 1901 — 1903
Dobrowoda 1896 — 1898 Stopnica 1905 — 1906
Dobrowoda 1901 Stopnica 1909
Dobrowoda 1903 — 1914 Stopnica 1913
Olesnica 1875 — 1890 Stopnica 1923
Olesnica 1892 — 1913 Szczebrzusz 1875
Opatowiec 1823 Szczebrzusz 1877 — 1891
Opatowiec 1826 — 1830 Szczebrzusz 1894
Opatowiec 1832 — 1834 Szczebrzusz 1896 — 1900
Opatowiec 1839 — 1844 Szczebrzusz 1903
Opatowiec 1872 Zborowek 1875 — 1887
Opatowiec 1875 — 1879 Zborowek 1889 — 1895
Opatowiec 1881 — 1885 Zborowek 1897 — 1908

At present, I am compiling a spreadsheet from the alegata in the above table. I’ll probably publish an analysis of my findings. In some article after the findings, I may write an article on the stamps seen in an alegata and what their purpose was. But right now I wanted to answer again why is there an alegata.

Why an alegata?

The reasons are more varied then I had originally assumed. Here are some reasons, you will find an alegata:

  1. The groom (mostly) or the bride or perhaps both were born in another, remote parish.
  2. The bride or the groom  (or both) were widowed.
  3. The wife is notified in a letter(s) that her husband has died in military service and is now a widow.
  4. The far flung future requests a church record from the past.
  5. The future provides a court document of a vital record change or asks for information on an individual(s).
  6. A remote parish or USC notifies an original parish of a death or a marriage (see #1).

There may be other reasons too. But at any rate, if you see a marriage in your parish books and (you see the groom is from an outside parish or the bride was born elsewhere, then you should look to see if there exists an alegata. The alegata will provide additional data substantiating the marriage can take place.

I once found an alegata about an ancestor when there was only alegata online (typically not indexed). It had info about a marriage that was yet to be published online. Further more, both the groom and bride were widowed and hence I was also provided with death data on the prior spouses.  The marriage and the alegata taken together can provide you a means to track down your migrating ancestors and where they came from or where they moved to.

Also, please note, that as of the present (4-June-2018), no Alegata have been indexed. So that data is a complete mystery. So who knows what treasures you might find, just by doing an exhaustive search through alegata.

Next time, a sample of what alegata look like, so you know what you are seeing. It can be confusing due to the multitude of time eras involved (seeing multiple languages) or you may see many differing forms due to the various timeframes involved. We’ll break it down in a rather lengthy blog article with pictures and descriptions.

read more »

May 21, 2018

British Royalty Has Polish Royalty DNA — #19th #Cousins

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19 Generations back to Wladyslaw Jagiello (from Prince Harry)

British Royal Family Tree

Prince Harry & Duchess of Sussex Meghan will have children who are 19th cousins to Władysław Jagiełło King of Poland & Grand Duchy Of Lithuania (& Queen Jadwiga)!

❤ 🇵🇱 🇲🇱 🇬🇧 💙

[Thanks to source: http://www.moremaiorum.pl]

Family Tree Pdf:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1hggrx3ZygJUKTHrc5Fz_kzrQTopjPWw6

May 17, 2018

Alegata Are Genealogy Time Machines — #Genealogy #Polish #ChurchRecords

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Early Alegata: 1823, 1826, 1827…

       Opatowiec Parish in Kielce Gubernia

Stanczyk loves alegata. Let’s see you have Birth (urodzony/chrzest), Marriage (małżeństwo/słuby, zapiowiedzi), Alegata, Death (Zgony/Śmierci). The cycle of life via church records (sacrements). Reading alegata are very interesting indeed. Sometimes its like gossip… “Do you know who is getting married here?” Other times its solemn, like the death of a soldier. But it is a time machine of sorts, that allows you to see backward and on rare occasions forward. It is this time machine capability that may help you locate missing records.

What are Alegata?

Alegat is a Polish word of Latin origin, from allegatio, “sending someone as an intermediary; a citation of proof; a submitted document.”

It is not only an interesting relic of phraseology from ecclesiastical language, it provides great potential genealogical documents of significance. This word, seemingly forgotten and archaic, is currently undergoing a rebirth, precisely because of genealogy. Many beginning researchers do not know about the existence and meaning of these documents. Alegata is the plural of Alegat. Sometimes they are found at the end of church books as loose pages. When they are found in their own books, they are called Alegata or Aneksy. They are most common in the former Russian-Poland partition. As is shown in the picture (by red arrows) they date to just after the Napoleonic Era.

What were Alegata Used For?

These are Polish Church documents to establish an eligibility for a church sacrament. Most often they are used for marriages. Their purpose is often to document a death and thus making the widow/widower eligible to remarry in the church. Sometimes its used where the groom (most often) if from a remote/foreign parish is a baptised Catholic. I have seen a few other purposes: name change, soldier’s death, etc. Often the inquiries in later years are from courts or remote Polish parishes and are forms.  However, for the genealogist, they can fill in the gap for a missing church record. Often because of the marriage aspect, they can help you (the genealogist) track movements of your ancestors across parishes. In the coming articles, we’ll look at a few examples.

May 7, 2018

Searchin’ for Sobieszczanski — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Sobieszczanski ( собещаньский )

   114               Sobieszczanski        Jan

A ponderously long search for an ancestral parish is over!

Stanczyk was humbled. This jester could always find someone’s ancestral parish in the Russian-Poland partition (zabory). Yet in his own family tree the Sobieszczanski (aka Sobb) I was unable to locate.

Doubling the frustration is I had Stanisław (Stanley) Roman Sobieszczanski ‘s Naturalization papers. It plainly said Lesnik, Russian Poland.

Declaration of Intent

The problem? In the Skorowidz Miejscowości Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej there were 19 Lesnik/Lesniki and in the Russian-Poland Gazetteer there were another handful (some possibly overlapping as they were different time periods. There were no LESNIK. I had to consider diacriticals (accents). The L could be Ł and the e could be ę and the s could be ś and the n could be ń. Thankfully, the i and k did not have diacritics. But that still left a lot of combinations. But one-by-one I searched. I looked up in the gazeteers and found parishes. Some were not online, but many were. Alas, those online did not have any Sobieszczanski. I searched http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php  (Lubgens)  and there were Sobieszczanski, but I could not confirm they were mine. No Lesnik. I searched in geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl too and again I found Sobieszczanski but again no good matches and not good enough locations to believe that is what Stanley meant.

That’s when I thought to look at a map that indicated parishes. I still thought Lesnik was a parish. So I went to: http://ipgs.us/mapinfo/atlas1907/main.html . I looked at the Lublin powiat (map 31); nothing promising, but I did see a village on the border of an adjacent powiat named Sobieszczany, so I thought perhaps they came from there. So I looked in the adjacent Janow (map39) and I found a couple of Lesnik (duzy/maly) villages in B3 quadrant.

I could not find Lesnik Duzy or Maly in any gazetteer???. Frustration. In looking at map 39, I saw Marynopol looked to be near a circle with a cross that indicated a parish. But I could not find Marynopol in the gazetteer. Very puzzling. I tried to  find nearly named towns and I did find one but it was in Kielce gubernia, not Lublin. So I looked and saw GOSCIERADOW. I quick checked metryki.genebaza.pl and saw they had GOSCIERADOW in Kielce-AP Sandomierz. Only 1890-1901 but at least I could see if there were any Sobieszczanski and get my bearings as too what Sobieszczanski looked like in Russian/Cyrillic and in cursive handwriting. My first try I found Jan Sobieszcanski in 1891 (see top pic).  His record indicated he lived in LISNIK. Well what do you know Jan’s parents were Michal Sobieszczanski & Stanislawa Kowalska and these were the names I had from Stanley’s first marriage record in USA (Depew, NY). So I was pretty sure (99%) that I had my parish. But they did not go back before 1890 and Stanley clearly enumerated many times his birth year was 1886. However, his younger brother Tadeusz had come to the USA as well and I had his info, so I looked up the birth year and it was 1896! Ok, they had that year in the range 1890-1901, so I should find a Tadeusz in 1896 (+/- 1 year).  Ok, his birthday was in October (not December), but the year and the parent names were exact matches, the village a very close match. I was now 100% certain I had my parish and my family. Success!

P.S.

LISNIK DUZY was in the gazetteer and GOSCIERADOW was the parish.

May 2, 2018

1916

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1916 Busko parish book of marriages

Busko – 1916 Marriages

Stanczyk, always thought that while Poland was partitioned (1772-1918) and from 1868-1918 that the vital records and other “official” documentation in the Russian partition (zabór) were written in Russian / Cyrillic. Perhaps that is not PRECISELY true.

Consider for example the image with this article. In fact let us examine marriage #4 (at the bottom image), bewteen Waclaw Balabanski & Maryanna Zwolska. All of the text is written in Polish (not Russian, nor Latin). Even the index for 1916 was written in Polish/Latin characters. However, in 1915 the records were written in Russian/Cyrillic characters. Now this is a rural part of Poland and perhaps lacking in oversight, but cognizant of the politics/war raging.

What may be happening and reflected in the church records is, that in 1915 a temporary client-state was setup by Germany & Austria-Hungary due to the Russia’s  withdrawal from the World War (I) and the chaos in the Russian Empire (with the Bolshevik revolution in 1917). So the Russian-Poland partition was not so obliged to write in Russian any more now that there was no more Russian hegemony in Poland.

What lovely information these books show, besides the marriage in 13-February-1916, we also see the death dates for the bride groom in 1951, 1979. We also get precise birthdays for the newlyweds as well as their ages.

May 1, 2018

HRH Prince Louis Arthur Charles — #Birth #Certificate

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

HRH Princess Charlotte — Birth Certificate

We have the young Prince Louis ‘s Birth Certificate!

Compare to (his siblings ) …

  1. HRH Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana
  2. HRH Prince George Alexander Louis

 

 

HRH Prince George - Birth CertificatePrince Louis Arthur Charles - Birth Certificate

April 23, 2018

Duke & Duchess of Cambridge — #3rd #Baby

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Royal Genealogy update … HRH Queen Elizabeth has a new great-grandson (son of Duke William of Cambridge and Duchess Kate Middleton). The baby’s name will be announced in two days!

• New Prince of Cambridge born at 11am weighing 8lbs 7oz

• Mother and baby ‘doing well’, Kensington Palace says

Birthdate: 23-April-2018

Birthplace: St. Mary’s Hospital, London

[update: 4/27/2018 —

Name: Louis Arthur Charles

(Prince Louis the Vth in line for the throne).

Video

Line of Succession for the 92 year old HRH Queen Elizabeth


April 16, 2018

All Politics Is Genealogy — #Politics #Genealogy #USCensus #2020

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

When you’re a jester, you see politics from afar and for such a good many eras. Alas, this jester has typed truth to power for as long as blogs have existed. Still, the 2010’s have been an unusually busy decade (and we still have two more years) for politics & genealogy. Do you agree?

Let’s recount some from this decade:

Obama was not born in USA. Uh, yes he was. Birth Certificate from Hawaii and newspaper announcement substantiated to all but DJT. Oh, how about Trump’s genealogy? Ancestor kicked out of Germany (for illegal emigration). John McCain was born in Panama Canal Zone. American? Yes. Mitt Romney was born in Mexico. American ? Yes. How about Ted Cruz and his Canadian birth to a Cuban father & an American mother who renounced her citizenship and registered & voted in Canada … yet still he professes that he is an American. Me thinks he professes too much.

We also heard and continue to hear about Elizabeth Warner (dubbed Pocohantas by DJT) who talked about her family lore/genealogy including American Indian ancestry (Cherokee). So its 2018, DJT who dodged military service by bonespurs, like his banned ancestor (grandfather was it?) that was kicked out of Germany for not serving in the army before emigrating illegally. Now he wants to deport DACA (Dreamers), even though we have Ted Cruz as a Senator, and a FLOTUS who overstayed her visa and used the “Einstein Exceptional Immigrant” law to be admitted legally (and then chain migrated her parents) to the USA. Oh it does not end there, now the GOP want to bring back an old question on the 2020 census:  “Where were you born and/or are you a US citizen?”

The census genealogy is a new wrinkle in voter suppression and representation. But it also could affect health care & hospitals and all manner of government expenditures that are based upon census demographics. This is actually a very important issue. So let’s unpack the nuances about the census, that most valuable of genealogy documents.

US Censuses

There are a few states that have utilized censuses as well but that is another blog. The US Census has been going every 10 years from 1790-2010, the next being 2020. They do not occur on years ending in ‘5’ as the press secretary seemed to allude. They also have a 72 year privacy rule. So why not fill out the census? It is after all the primary and sole method for apportioning representation. Do not be scared off or representation will go elsewhere (primarily southward). These are precisely the states that have enacted voter suppression laws that discriminate against poor or non-white citizens. So in effect you will be limiting voting and representation to places that are NOT protecting the constitution or your rights given you therein. This is why the census brouhaha in 2018 is so contentious. 2020 Census is coming and what you are asked needs to be finalized … ASAP!

Here is the 72 year privacy rule info:

72 year rule

The U.S. government will not release personally identifiable information about an individual to any other individual or agency until 72 years after it was collected for the decennial census. This “72-Year Rule” (92 Stat. 915; Public Law 95-416; October 5, 1978) restricts access to decennial census records.

After 72 years and then only under circumstances protecting against disclosure to the detriment of any individual according to  44 U.S.C. 2104  (from  Federal Records Act of 1950).

So protection safeguards are built in.

So a president that berates immigrants  (except those he’s married to) as criminals, he reneges on DACA, increases deportations and threatens to limit immigration to rules of his own choosing is talking about Census questions. Why? The answer appears to be, to intimidate naturalized citizens, permanent resident immigrants, visa visitors, and of course those who are not here legally or who over stayed their visas from being counted. As late as April 16th, 2018, the president was saying, the census would be used to prevent illegal voting!?! Uh, Mr. President, the census is private for 72 years, even if an illegal immigrant could vote illegally (not possible), he’d vote in as many as 18 Presidential elections before you knew HE did it. So that is another idiotic premise and fake justification for needing the census question. But it does show your intent to intimidate people, possibly legal citizens who were born elsewhere and became a naturalized citizen. That IS disenfranchisement of voters; voter intimidation. It is illegal. So that is the context on which the battle lines have been drawn.

But they should be counted. The naturalized citizens are entitled to voting (the other classes not). But each is entitled to representation in government as they are taxpayers. Additionally, funding for infrastructure or hospitals and other aid are apportioned by population. If you are not counted then you are losing out on government spending.  Now homeless or poor people who lack documentation or the means to get documentation may be afraid of the government. But if you are not counted then they too stand to lose from  social safety net programs be eliminated or moved to other population centers according to apportionment. So make sure you are counted in the census you are protected! Do not lose your government spending to another locale out of fear or intimidation.

There will be NO access to personally identifiable info for 72 years. The only access is too summaries and other aggregations of the numbers to study issues related to government budgets.

 

Census Questions

The questions from every prior census can be examined at: census questions . Now there are short forms and there are long forms, so there is no short answer to when was the last time a question about citizenship was asked. Before the Civil War the counting questions were more or less related to being male, female, black, white, free, slave.

1860 is the first time the question, “Where were you born?” was asked, including country if not USA. In 1900, they finally ask if you are a citizen or not (as well as where you were born and where your parents were born). So we see a new nuance of citizenship vs nativity. 1970 starts the concept of short form vs long form questions. 85% were short form. The short form did not ask where you were born. The long form asked both where and whether naturalized. 1980 short form merely asks if you are Spanish/Hispanic (not where born or whether a citizen). The Long form (every 7th person) does ask where born & citizenship. Its not clear but it appears as if households with fewer than 7 people just filled in short form.

Be a good citizen. Be an informed citizen and go to:

https://www.census.gov/history/

April 15, 2018

Poland Genealogy Between 1918-1939

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has noted an uptick in interest in my Army Conscripts (poborowe) pages.

  1. Conscript Lists of Kieleckie Wojewodztwo
  2. Genealogy in Poland Between The Wars (1918-1939, Conscript Lists)

Here is a link to Google Doc (large PDF):

1932 Conscript List — https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AGfIiAjrkiwSvopGOBYSFx7W96-8jIR_

April 9, 2018

Swabian Germans / Donau Schwabians — #Genealogy #German #Croatian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

All the way to the east (right) we see Osiek (by red 3. ), you will find Sarvas & Tenje and a bit further away west (left) & south we see Đakovo(aka Djakovo, Diakovo) written as “Diakovar” (near red 2.).

This is where a bit of my MT-DNA comes from. You see my Swabian German ancestors came from Baden-Wurtemberg Germany to Sarvas & Tenje about 1750. They were Catholic Germans.

These are the ancestral villages I am working with on my maternal side.

In Tenje we find: Gottler/Göttler, Eisenbeiser. In Sarvas, we find Vespek (aka Veszpek, Vesbek).

Recently, this jester made good head way into tracing genealogy in these parts. So I have my Swabian German from these ancestors (via Vendel born 1858) …

April 5, 2018

Croatia, German, Genealogy — #Sarvas, #Tenje, #Djakowo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kettler = Gettler (aka Gottler/Goettler)

One could be excused if you thought this blog was solely upon Russian-Polish partition genealogy. Well Stanczyk has another branch (maternal) that is German. I have been told they were Swabian Germans located in modern day Croatia in the Osiek-Baranja county, specifically: Sarvas, Tenje, and Djakovo. This area was Austria-Hungary, Jugoslavia and now Croatia, but there were German Catholic settlers here.


Today is a quick post on the area and the family names of interest. This database can be searched online at FamilySearch.org (Croatia). According to Google Maps it is only about 10 minutes (via car) or about 90 minutes on foot between Sarvas and Tenja.

Now this interesting to Stanczyk, because his maternal grandparents came from these two villages/towns. Vespek came from Sarvas and Gottler came from Tenja. As with other families, there are affiliated families that are “genetic markers” to my Vespek & Gottler families: Reiner, Reither/Rajter, Elter, Keller, Eisenbeiser, Kasper/Kaschper.

What I learned from other Gottler researchers in this area is that I should expect to see that Gottler = Gettler = Goettler. Think “get” not “got”. The ‘O’ has an umlaut over it. So Gottler. Now If you look closely at the image at top, we see the priest recorded Gettler in two ways (Gettler, Kettler). In fact he recorded that equivalence in the record! So now I have to keep Kettler/Kottler in mind as well.

Now the jester mentioned Djakovo (which is a bit west of the map’s left border) because my mother’s two half brothers (Joseph & Wendell) emigrated from “Jakovo” from an uncle whose last name was Rajter. Now I know their mother’s maiden name was Eisenbeiser, so I am expecting to find an Eisenbeiser + Rajter(Reither) marriage in one of these villages.

More later as my research firms up. But if you have an ancestor from Sarvas and in particular House #43 in Sarvas, then we need to compare family trees.

 

March 24, 2018

Polish Genealogy Blog — #RussianPoland #partition #KielceGubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Stopnica and surrounding areas: Pacanow, Biechow, Olesnica, Zborowek, ...

Click for Full Size image

The parishes on this map (large) are the predominant parishes that Stanczyk writes about. So If you ancestral villages are here or more generally in Kielce (Kieleckie) Gubernia /  Wojewodztwo  (now SwietoKrzyskie) then you can learn some useful information to help you in your genealogy research. Feel free to email questions too!

Parishes (partial list) / Parafia (Russian-Poland partition):

Beszowa, Biechow, Olesnica, Ostrowce, Pacanow, Polaniec, Ruda, Solec, Stopnica, Swiniary, Szczebrzusz, Zborowek


Below the Visutla River / Wisla  Rzeka (Austrian-Poland partition):

Slupiec, Suchy Grunt, Szczucin, Wadowice Dolny, Wolka

 

March 22, 2018

Conscription Lists of Kieleckie Województwo — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1932 Kielce Conscript ListOn St. Patrick’s Day, Stanczyk wrote about two Conscription Lists (poborowi) from the 1930’s in Kielce Woj. There were 9,300++ records of families in this province/state whose son was born between 1891-1911.

Now this being an era immediately preceding World War 2, it is important to Jewish genealogists whose families lost 6 million family members, about 3 million in Poland alone (even 1 million Christian Poles) were lost to NAZI concentration camps. So alternative sources are critical.

That makes these Conscript Lists vital. In, my analysis of the smaller list (1933 had 2,000 families), almost 25% were Jewish families! So between 1932 & 1933 there were 9,300 families listed. If that 25% holds for both years, then Jewish genealogists can locate about 2,325 families (a conscript, man & his parents). The conscript is listed with his birth year, and residence. So that is some good data for genealogists, plus you can see the original spelling of the family name.

I am hopeful that I will have a laptop soon and be able to build a database of these vital records. Until then you can contact this jester via email and ask about your family (must be from Kielce Województwo) and I’ll look through the two Conscript Lists for you.

If your ancestor is from another Polish Województwo then you can search online archives or digital libraries for “poborowi” to locate conscript lists from those Województwa.

March 21, 2018

Calculating Consanguinity — #Genealogy #Genetic #Internet

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Y Chromosome ?

Stanczyk learned a new trick! There is software called Wolfram Wolfram AlphaAlpha. It parses your textual question and answers it via its AI/Mathematics engine. The software is similar to smart-assistants like  Siri or Alexa being asked a question, except Alpha coming from Wolfram is really great at math. It also is parsing your typed words. So I mostly used it for math. But, a facebook user told me to use Wolfram Alpha to calculate if our common ancestor indicated kinship. It did not:

My grand-aunt’s husband’s first cousin’s wife

Degree of kinship

I could try my cousin’s son who just tested his DNA. Do we share a Y chromosome?

1st cousin once removed

Since this jester is indeed male, we do share a Y-chromosome. Our degree of kinship is five (father, grandparents, uncle, 1stcousin,

1stcousin-once-removed). Our blood relationship is 3.125% (1/32). Now the 32 (in 1/32) is derived from the degree of kinship. (1/(2^5))= 1/32= 0.03125= 3.125% . Very cool. Now I don’t need to keep a chart around to calculate my degree of kinship or estimated percentage of dna shared.

Thanks Camille N Greg!

Now some useful notes for you to try. The Wolfram Alpha is an iphone app and its also a web app, runable via a link (URL):

http://m.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=my+uncle%27s+grandson

Notice I took a shortcut. That will hurt the Y-chromosome calculation which depends on gender. Type the following instead:

my father’s brother’s son’s son

Which is the same as:

my uncle’s grandson

Apparently, the shorter form does not lend itself to helping the software determine all genders.

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