Archive for ‘Archive’

June 28, 2018

INVENTORY: Polish Kingdom / Russian Poland partition (Kielce Gubernia) — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk felt it was time again to survey the gubernia, Kielce Gubernia (Kieleckie). This jester was surprised at the number of new scans made available since the last survey/inventory.

To use these sources, you need to have a user-id/password and be logged in…except the SzukajWArchiwach requires no authentication to use. These are the Kielce Gubernia records that ARE ONLINE! There may be other records available in the parish, the USC, the National Archive of Poland or in the Church Archive (Diocessan).

 

First, let me make a list of my Internet sources (please email any more that you know):

2-July-2018 (as of)

  1. AP-Kielce
  2. AD-Kielce
  3. AP-Sandomierz
  4. FamilySearch-Czestochowa-Kielce
  5. FamilySearch-Evangelical-Kielce
  6. FamilySearch-Evangelical-Radom
  7. FamilySearch-Lublin-Kielce
  8. FamilySearch-Radom-Kielce
  9. SzukajWArchiwum-Kielce (pages 7, 18, 19, 20)
  10. SzukajWArchiwum-Sandomierz (no pages had scans)
  11. Geneteka-Metryki-SwietoKrzyskie

 

 

 

 

Sources <Notes> Counts By Source
AD-Kielce 128
AP-Kielce  10 jewish congregations 180
AP-Sandomierz  16 jewish congregations 121
Czestochowa 8
Evangelical-Kielce Marriages 1914 0
Evangelical-Radom Births 1866-1872 0
FamilySearch-Lublin-Kielce 1
FamilySearch-Radom-Kielce 287
SzukajWArchiwum-Kielce 35 pages (100 lines/pages) 18
SzukajWArchiwum-Sandomierz 13 pages (100 lines/page) 0
Geneteka-Metryki-SwietoKrzyskie 14 powiaty 72

 

The next table is 815 rows [2-July-2018 (as of)]

 

read more »

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February 25, 2018

The Other Things Found — #Historical #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

While Stanczyk was searching newspapers for military conscripts, he found many items useful to genealogy…

Today was a landholders chart for Niegosławice village, in Pacanów gmina, Stopnica powiat of 22-June-1933.

Found in Newspaper: Kielecki Dziennik Wojewódzki

Stanczyk would like to call your attention to one of his ancestors, on line 12 (Leon Wleciał).

This chart had four columns:

Line Number, Landholder(s), Plot Number, Plot area in ha (hectares).

So on Line #12 (col. 1), we see Leon Wleciał (col. 2), Plot #18 (col. 3), 6.1019ha (col. 4).

This Leon was not the Leon who came to America, but the Leon who was a witness/god-father in church records for the Wleciałowscy who came to America (and some who stayed in Poland too).

You want to search for:

Okręgowego Urzęd Ziemskiego

(Official District Land in <gubernia-name>).

April 3, 2017

Polonia In Canadian Expeditionary Forces in WWI — #Genealogy #Polish 🇨🇦🇺🇸

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon



How to find government military records.

If you have a name of an ancestor who may have fought at Vimy , you should start by searching Library and Archives Canada’s online database of Personnel Records of the First World War.

The Personnel Records of the First World War database includes the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service files.

So far (1-April-2017), nearly 417,000 out of 640,000 of these full files have been digitized, with more added every two weeks.

The service files are typically 25 to 75 pages long and include records on enlistment, training, medical and dental procedures, disciplinary actions, payments, medals, discharges and deaths.

In cases where the full service file isn’t yet uploaded, you may still be able see digitized enlistment records that contain birthplaces, next of kin, addresses, religions, trades and physical characteristics.

Start by typing in the surname and hitting search on this page. Click on the name in the search results. You will likely see an uploaded image of their enlistment document that you can click on that to enlarge it.

If you also see the words “Digitized service file – PDF format” followed by a number, click on the number and the entire scanned service file will open. These files are very large so it may require a fast internet connection to download, or take minutes to appear on your screen.

For example, you can see the first nine pages of John Lescinski’s service record (top of blog). In thus case there were forty (40) pages in the accompanying PDF.

It’s not always clear in the service files whether a person served in a particular battle, like at Vimy Ridge. However, that may be found in the online database of War Diaries of the First World War, which include daily accounts of what troops did in the field. These diaries contain very little personal information, but do show where units were deployed.

Take care. It only showed my first two pages with a link to download the PDF (which actually had 40 pages).

My link (John Lescinski):

http://flip.it/hPTIUh

January 24, 2016

Adamczak from Trzebieslawice — #Polish #Genealogy #Łoniow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1908_Birth22_MaryannaAdamczak_dau_WalentyElzbieta

Birth #22 from 1908 Łoniow Births – Maryanna Adamczak daughter of Walenty Adamczak & Elzieta Kamuda God Parents: Wicenty Adamczak & Rozalia Adamczak all from Trzebieslawice in Parish Łoniow

January 6, 2016

Eastpointe, Macomb County, MI Turns Vital Records Over To The County — #Genealogy #Michigan

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Macomb County, Michigan is an interesting county.  To whit, there had been four cities in Macomb county who maintained their own vital records, instead of the county clerk. Those four cities are: Eastpointe, Saint Clair Shores, Sterling Heights and Warren. Now wouldn’t you know those just happen to be the major cities of the ELIASZ clan in Michigan. This jester just assumed that Macomb county had those duties. No wonder genealogy is hard, the exceptions get you.

Now this came to light recently when in November (2015), Eastpointe decided to turn over its birth, death record keeping to Macomb County. Eastpointe turned over  to the county 90 years worth of vital records. The records date back to 1925 when Eastpointe was known as Halfway (I did not know that), in 1929 it became East Detroit, and finally in 1992 it became Eastpointe. So if you were missing data from Halfway/East Detroit/Eastpointe now you may be able to find them at the county clerk’s office in Mt Clemens. For those whose data is in St. Clair Shores, Sterling Heights or Warren, now you know the data if its not in the county clerk’s office is in those cities’ municipal buildings.

See today’s Macomb Daily newspaper.


 

 

January 4, 2016

Kielce Holdings Possible in GenBaza … — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielcach Archive Holdings

              partial pdf table of Kielce church/synagouge books

Stanczyk, was looking at the GenBaza news of what was being indexed and loaded in order to see what was coming online (… eventually). This jester noticed a PDF document of the inventory of books at Diocessan Archives (AD), State Archive (AP) and in some of the parishes too.

Now let me hasten to add that this is NOT an inventory of online records/images. It is only a list of what may yet come and of course some of these are already online, but many more are just potential data available to be indexed and loaded.

The actual PDF document is here . A final note the Fond# is similar to what the Library of Congress calls a Record Group. It is the identifier for requesting the resource inside the archive. Only State Archives have a Fond#, not the church archive nor the church parish.

 

 Fond #  Place Name Date Range Books Count Count of Images     NOTES
Bebelno 1787-1864  13 1,174  AD
Bejsce 1586-1862  37 3,966  AD
Biechów 1674-1855  50 3,598  AD
355 Pacanów 1875-1908 64 3,703  AP
373 Pacanów moj 1875-1912  55 1,957  AP (jewish)
399 Pałecznica 1861-1911  77 3,235  AP
September 1, 2015

INS Entry Numbers — #Genealogy #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Yesterday, Stancyk wrote about the three pieces of info that you need to request info from INS Holdings in the D. C. Archives.

I wanted emphasize the Entry # a bit more. Yesterday and today we were discussing Subject, Policy, & Correspondence Files. These are NOT the A-Files or C-Files that the INS/USCIS provides genealogy research for. These correspondence files were turned over to NARA & are in the National Archives.


The Entry#’s 1-8 — Early Correspondence

Entry#9 — INS Policy Corespondence

Entry#26 — Bureau of Naturalization Correspondence

Entry#P-4A — Central Office Files

The Subject Card Indexes in Ancestry.com are Entry#9.

These are all RG85, Entry#9. The final piece of info (File#) comes from the subject index card. In Leon Pieszczochowicz ‘s  case it was: 55,874-84

So that is how I got my three pieces. Most people will be Entry#9 (deportation, illiterate, disease, crimes, etc. — immigration related) with some people possibly falling into Entry#26 if their correspondence is about the Naturalization (naturalization issues).

Tags: , , ,
August 31, 2015

INS/USCIS & NARA – How To Do Research — #Genealogy #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1934_LeonP_RemovalLast week Stanczyk took part in  a webinar:  An Overview of Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Records at the National Archives — by Zach Wilske.

It was an excellent webinar. It was my first genealogy webinar! The AT&T Connect that the NARA used for the webinar worked extremely well. I used the iPhone app (as opposed to the laptop software). The iPhone app work well. I heard the presenter over the phone and was able to see the slides simultaneously on the phone.  Very nice choice by the NARA/USCIS and executed well by Zach Wilske.

This jester had a goal to figure out how to research a fact from a number located on Ancestry for Leon Pieszczochowicz. I found Leon in Ancestry’s:  Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952

I had found a number(s)/code :  55,874-84

Mr Wilske did a thorough job explaining the topic and out popped my answer without my even having to text a question to the presenter. I needed to go to  NARA in Washington D.C.

I also learned that you need three pieces of info: RG (Record Group),  Entry#, & File# . So what did I have and how do I research it?

 

Ah, I have a File#. What do I do with it?

This jester will be looking up (on a reference service slip, as shown above):
Leon Pieszczochowicz
RG#     85
Entry# 9
File#    55,874-84

As per Mr. Wilske, I sent an email to: cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov

to confirm the file is still extant.

January 25, 2015

Resources For Albanians in Southern Italy #Genealogy — #Albania

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Calabria Region

Calabria Region

In my wife’s family tree we have two branches of Albano-Italians (Arbëresh):

Augustine = D’Agostino (in Italy and early ship manifests)

They come from, Carsoli, in Aquila (Province), Abruzzo (region) of Italy  [eastwards from Rome]

The Di Lazzaro, Todaro branches going backwards from my wife’s great-grandmother are from:

Castroregio (commune), subdivision of Castrovillari, in Cosenza (Province), Calabria (region) of Southern Italy

Castroregio =  Kastërnexhi (Albanian)

Both branches appear to be Albanians (Arbëresh) and were founding families from 15th century migration from Albania to the remote Italian states of the Southern of Italy and even a few in Sicily too. These were from the Princes of Albania and their retinue and warriors.

Resources:

Castroregio is online in FamilySearch.org –

Italy, Cosenza, Castrovil…on (Tribunale), 1866-1910-> Cosenza-> Castroregio

Its State Archive (in Castrolvillari branch office of Cosenza) – Contact / Research Info —

http://www.archiviodistatocosenza.beniculturali.it/index.php?en/130/sezione-di-castrovillari

This had no online record images as other Italian State Archives did .

Carsoli – In Antenati –

http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/v/Archivio+di+Stato+di+LAquila/Stato+civile+italiano/Carsoli/

Inventory of State (Italy) Archives Online –

http://www.archivi-sias.it/consulta_inventari.asp?ResetFilter=Y&OnLine=1

Twenty-Six State Archives in Antenati with > 26 Million images Online –

http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/?q=gallery


Castroregio_4

Castroregio_1

Castroregio_2

Castroregio_3

December 4, 2014

GenBaza News – New OnLine Records … #Polish #Genealogy #Genealogia #Polska

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk noted the news from Genbaza over the last two weeks:

Please note the phrase, “dostęp tylko dla indeksujących” means only access to indexes (for indexing?). So it appears we will be getting some new data (and/or images) online very soon.

Some of the parishes/cities are given first in Polish followed by their German name (i.e. Prussian-Poland partition). An example is:  Mierzyn [pl] – Alt Marrin [de]

Here is what they are working on …

 

Nowości w GenBazie

2014-12-02 dodałem — do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących
USC Sowno – Zowen
USC Mierzyn – Alt Marrin
USC Stanomino – Standenmin

2014-11-30 — do katalogu AP Kielce (dostęp tylko dla indeksujących)
Książnica Wielka 1699-1906
Kurzelów 1733-1913
Pierzchnica 1875-1913
Tarłów 1810-1873

2014-11-29 — do katalogu AP Gdańsk zindeksowane USC
USC Okalice
USC Leźno
USC Konarzyny Kościerskie – uzupełnienie

2014-11-28  — do katalogu AP Kielce
uzupełnienia Parafii Odrowąż (1909-1912) [Editor. – Parish Supplement]

— do katalogu AP Grodzisk
Grodziec 1909-1912
Czerwińsk alegaty 1808-1822
Leszno alegaty 1826-1837
Nieporęt 1907r
Zaborów alegaty 1855r
Izdebna alegaty 1816 i 1819r
Grodzisk Mazowiecki alegaty 1808-1825

— do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących/Zugriff nur für die Indizierung
USC Smęcino – Schmenzin
USC Spore – Sprasse
USC Stare Drawsko – Drahim
USC Stary Chwalim – Valm


Good Luck Hunting!

July 4, 2014

4th of July 2014 − Reading of Declaration of Independence

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Independece Hall Philadelphia

education use from http://etc.usf.edu/clipart

Stanczyk was not born in Philadelphia, but moved here over two decades ago. But I really love the city of Brotherly Love. I like to call it the cradle of American civilization and we are the keystone state because of our position within the original 13 colonies. Over a hundred years ago my busia arrived in the USA here in Philadelphia on the steamship Prinz Adalbert − a nice tie-in between my family history and my adopted home town.

One of the reasons I love Philadelphia is its oldness (relative to America — not the rest of the world). I like to play tourist in my adopted home town. So I have seen the celebrated points of the colonial history of our town. Now we are on the verge of another 4th of July and that means the Welcome America celebration which seems to get longer every year (is it two weeks long now?) and with good reason for all of the special events (fireworks, concerts, liberty medals, etc.) that occur.

But let Stanczyk clue you in on a free activity for you and your kids that makes you feel a part of America’s past. Do not just visit the Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell / Visitor center, the Constitution Center and the recently opened National Museum of American Jewish History. These plus all things Ben Franklin, Betsy Ross, Elfreth Alley, are worthy ventures (take a carriage ride to get a lay of the land — Stanczyk’s favorite). One event Stanczyk stumbled upon was the Historical re-enactment of the first public  reading of the Declaration of Independence. This happens 4 days later (July 8th). It will be in the courtyard behind Independence Hall. Free for all wandering through. It gives your family a real sense of the American narrative and allows you to pretend you were there at the inception of this grand experiment ! Buy the kids a copy of the Declaration and/or Constitution this is what the Independence Holiday is all about. The National Archives in Washington D.C. has an original document that you can visit.  5 Fast Facts of Declaration of Independence.

Declaration of Independence

July 3, 2014

Kielce Parishes On-line in SzukajWArchiwach — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Previously, Stanczyk has written about what is available online for the former Gubernia (or Województwo) Kielce. In this article I am listing the SzukajWArchiwach.pl parishes online with year ranges and scan image counts. Please notice that links are provided for you to go directly to those you are interested in or you can go to the list of all parishes available (since as you know an article like this becomes out of date periodically).

 

Poland’s Archives (Kielce) Parish Year Range Scans #
21/1700/0 Brzegach 1810-1912  5,652
21/1701/0 Chomentowie 1810-1939  5,997
21/1702/0 Ciernie 1810-1907  5,717
21/1703/0 Imielnie 1810-1912  9,680
21/1704/0 Jędrzejowie 1812-1911  18,045
21/1705/0 Korytnicy 1810-1912  –
21/1706/0 Kozłowie 1811-1913  5,795
21/1707/0 Krzcięcicach 1810-1912  9,569
21/1708/0 Łukowej 1811-1909  4,732

Parishes (Parafia):  Brzegach,  Chomentowie,  Ciernie,  Imielnie,  Jędrzejowie,  Korytnicy,  Kozłowie,  Krzcięcicach,  Łukowej

Cut and Save— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

June 19, 2014

GenBaza.pl — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk noticed yesterday (18-JUNE-2014)  that Metryki.genebaza.pl had some additions.  The Polish Archive from Gdansk (AP_GDANSK)  was added to Genbaza.pl  late on Wednesday.

 

So now when you click on the above link, you should see:

GenBaza 6 Archives

GenBaza – 6 Archives

The top archive, AD_Kielce,  is a Diocessan archive, the church archive from Kielce Diocese (Stanczyk’s ancestral diocese).

The new archive is second in this list, AP_GDANSK.  The church archive and the bottom four archives were already there.

 

If you click on the AP_GDANSK, then you will see five research collections (aka fonds). One is an evangelical parish from Krokowa and there are also four USC (civil registration offices, similar to the USA’s county clerk) fonds with vital records.

I looked at two of the USCs (Sopot – a very nice resort town on the Baltic and Kamienica Szlachecka). Their data started at year 1874 and each link was either a Birth or a Marriage or a Death metrical book. Each vital record type was a separate unit. So you had three units per year. My early searches did not locate any alegata in 1874 Sopot.

As you may have surmised this is Prussian-Poland partition data and as such is in the common German long-form birth (or marriage or death) certificates (not the Napoleonic Codex paragraph form of Russian-Poland nor the Latin Box format so prevalent in Austrian-Poland partitions.  The form’s text  are in German. The first birth record I saw was in 1874 Kamienica Szlachecka Births (#1), was  Otto August Carl Mark (son of Ferdinand Mark & Amalie Mark nee Gohrbanet).

AP Gdansk

 

 

June 6, 2014

Kielce Archive On-Line in SzukajWArchiwach.pl — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive, #Online

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielce - KielcachStanczyk has recently written [24-May-2014, “Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie (an update)” ] about what is on-line from the Kielce Gubernia/Wojewowdztwo … so of course you know that means — the information is out of date already in this Internet Time world of ours!

Just today on Facebook I saw announced:   New records added to Szukajwarchiwach: http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/media/attachments/swa_share_06_2014.pdf on Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan page.

A pleasant surprise of 8 (osiem) parishes (parafia) were from the Kielce (Kielcach) archive:

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/21#tabZasoby

This jester examined Jędrzejowie where  some distant Eliasz (aka Elijasz/Heliasz) were known to live. I am envious, a complete or nearly complete century of records [1812-1911] for Birth / Marriage / Death (urodzeń / małżeństw / zgonów)  and even Alegata too in most cases.

That is a nice way to end the week! Powodzenia!

parishes:  Brzegach, Ciernie,  Imielnie,  Jędrzejowie,  Korytnicy, Kozlowie, Krzciecicach, Lukowej

May 24, 2014

Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie (an update) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Kielce, #Gubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Last year (December 13th, 2013), Stanczyk wrote about an “Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie “(or old Kielce Gubernia) Parish Books. It was produced from a Polish website: http://www.ksiegi-parafialne.pl . That was before I could go through its collected data. It appears some of their info was inaccurate / misleading about whether there was an online database at the links they mentioned. It was certainly before GenBaza.pl was loaded with some regional Polish Archives data and it lacked any mention of the Polish Archives themselves: http://szukajwarchiwach.pl .

 

Today’s blog is a three page posting, or rather a re-posting of a Facebook posting I made in Polish Genealogy Facebook page. This is just the GenBaza data for old Gubernia: Kielce/Kieleckie. This is a long read — hence the read “More …” breaks.

read more »

May 9, 2014

Research Trip … Some #Genealogical Finds — #Polish, #UPGS, 2014

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

18291219_LeszczynskiTomasz_Szczepan_twins_Wolica15

Stanczyk is tired, perplexed and satisfied ! If you love genealogy then you probably love the new finds — not just the elation and the happy dance that ensues, but because most new finds also cause new  questions that need to be solved or addressed.

For years, I have been searching for my LESZCZYNSKI roots (korzenie Leszczynscy). Previously only my friend Jacek from Krakow was able to locate some Leszczynskich in Biechow. He did not tell me his source for these records (no citation) and I have not been able to locate a source for them either — most perplexing. He also left me with, “You might want to look in Stopnica some day.”. That enigmatic quote always lingered with me lo these many years.

Now in January, GenBaza.pl came up with AD_KIELCE and AP_KIELCE scans online!!! By Kielce, I mean the former Wojewodztwo / Gubernia (or the regional Archives, both civil and religious). This is where my ancestral villages have all been located (so far). So I took Jacek’s long ago advice and looked in Stopnica for Leszczynskich   …  But how was I ever to connect the Stopnica LESZCZYNSKICH with my Biechow LESZCZYNSKICH?

Well as I was gorging myself with the ELIASZ of Pacanow in GenBaza, I was using GENTEKA as a kind of index into where I should look in GenBaza (which Years, and which Akts #). So I decided to search for Leszczynski using this method and looking at Births/Marriages/Deaths in Stopnica. There were 29 marriages (małżeństwa) in the parish of Stopnica, a parish I knew rather nothing about, much less the town families. But I stopped dead on one marriage. One Leszczynski, Jan Leszczynski, had a mother with a maiden name, Kordosz. Now I knew that my great-grandfather Tomasz married a Julianna Kordos (born in Swiniary). So I became very interested in Małżeństwa (Marriage) Akt #73 in 1881 Stopnica. Mystery solved! When I read the record I found that Jan’s parents were Tomasz & Julianna z. Kordosz[sic] Leszczynskich and the ages were correct. So I had my missing link to Stopnica. I also knew that Falęcin would be a focal point in the Stopnica parish. So I found all of Jan Leszczynski & Antonina Sieradzka ‘s children born in Stopnica. I also found that Jan had a few siblings who also married in Stopnica and between these Stopnica records and a few new ones in Biechow and examining witnesses and God Parents I had the correct set of records and more confirmations of other family knowledge. But I have digressed. This is a blog about my findings from a Genealogical Conference in Salt Lake City — UPGS, 2014.

As a result of my earlier GenBaza finds, I had new clues/mysteries that needed solving, plus some from other records that I had wanted to research in LDS microfilm. So I went to UPGS to find out if  Kroczyce, Palecznica, and Wolica had any records for me. Here are my BIG finds:

  1. Pelagia Kedzierska‘s birth record, 28-October-1882 in Kroczyce parish.
  2. Maciej Wlecial’s birth record,  28-February-1868 in Laszow, Palecznica parish.
  3. Tomasz Leszczynski ‘s birth record, 19-December-1829 in Wolica (village, parish, gmina).

This jester hit ALL of his major goals. Sure I did not find Jan Leszczynski or Franciszek Leszczynski birth records or Tomasz Leszczynski’s 1st marriage record to Julianna Kordos. But I found Tomasz Leszczynski’s birth record. At least I am 80% sure on Tomasz — I need his marriage record to prove it 100%, but I will now begin to make a case to myself via Social Network Analysis (SNA) whether this is indeed the correct  Tomasz or not.

It turns out that Tomasz’s (20-December-1829) was a twin (Szczepan his twin). I also knew Tomasz’s parents were: Jan Leszczynski, age 30 (-> born about 1799) and Anna Owczarczyk age 29 (-> born about 1800). I also knew the names of the witnesses and the God Parents too. One God Parent made me take note: Tekla Slawinska.  It turns out the Anna had a very rare name: OWCZARCZYK. So I was able to find her marriage record to Jan Leszczynski … in DZIERAZNIA (a nearby parish to Wolica, with many cross marriages). So now I had a fourth major find in my 2x-great-grandparent’s marriage record  19-JULY-1825 in Dzieraznia parish (village/gmina/powiat) of Szysczya. So now I had the names of yet another generation: Antoni & Katarzyna Leszczynskich. Now I have my 2nd & 3rd great-grandparents in the Leszczynski line. I also had two more parishes: Wolica & Dzieraznia!

A great adventure to be sure. I had many other finds that were not so as notable.  I had success in my Croatian VESPEKs line too. Also a minor confirmation of my wife’s paternal grandmother’s village: Kovesliget (Maramaros region) of Austria-Hungarian (aka Hapsburg) Empire. Kovesliget is now in modern day Romania. The creme-de-la-creme … doing the research while surrounded by  my Polish Genealogy friends at UPGS 2014. Priceless!

April 30, 2014

Wordless Wednesday — #Genealogy , #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

20140430-045723.jpg

Gminy Pisar — which I am translating as Secretary of Gminas.

One witness was the Gmina (singular) Mayor. Politically connected?

Oh this is the 28-October-1882 birth record of Pelagia Maria Kędzierska who will grow up to marry my grand-uncle Jan Elijasz.

April 24, 2014

1890 Kielce Gubernia Commemorative Book — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1867-1915 - Gubernia_Kielce,  Stopnica PowiatOn Easter Sunday, Stanczyk wrote about Logan Kleinwak / Genealogy Indexer. In the article, I used as an example of the database searches (sources) that genealogy indexer searches through as the: 1890 Kielce Gubernia Commemorative Book (Памятная книжка Келецкой губернии). That was a bit foreshadowing of today’s blog.   This blog is dominated by Genealogy, by Polish Genealogy, by Russian-Poland partition Genealogy, in particular the Kielce Gubernia (Wojewodztwo). Most of the time I write about topics that centers upon post-Napoleonic era (1815-ish to about 1918) which overlaps the era of the three partitions and the era of the Great Migration to the USA. One of the reasons for such a focus to connect with distant cousins on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. So today’s topic is to further understand the administrative structures of my ancestral villages in 1890 Kielce Gubernia. Where the red square is on today’s map-graphic is the geographic area we are speaking of. It is important to understand the administrative structures to trace your genealogy. So today we will be examining the hierarchy described by their Russian names as: Gubernia composed of Uyezds or Powiats which were composed of Gminas  (aka Wojewodztwo->Powiats->Gminas). There is also a religious hierarchy: Diocese-Deaconate-Parish. These hierarchies change over time as borders are drawn and redrawn. So Stanczyk pulled images of some these administrative structures and other data to put this research in a context of 1890 (roku) from the above title book which is written in Russian/Cyrillic. I am hopeful that seeing the Cyrillic from the book along with the English translation will aid other genealogists in their searches and research. There are a number of images and descriptions so this will be a long read if you are “up for it”.

read more »

March 24, 2014

Newspapers.com – #Genealogy, #Polish, #HistoricalNewspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

NewspapersClippings

Stanczyk has been experimenting with Newspapers.com and utilizing their Clippings to frame research topics.

So my current set of clippings are on my profile page: http://www.newspapers.com/profile/michael135/articles .

So if you are interested in Haller’s Army or General Jozef Haller then you may want to check it out. My initial focus is upon General Haller’s 1923 trip to the USA after World War I, in order to honor the men under his command that were in the USA. Then as today there were detractors to the general’s visits — which I had not previously known. His 1923 itinerary included a visit to the Lincoln homestead in Springfield, IL. He also honored the long US-Poland relationship by visiting the Pulaski memorial in D.C. too. I am left to ponder if the 1926 Emblem of Goodwill, “A Polish Declaration of Admiration and Friendship for the United States of America” might not have been influenced or inspired by General Haller.

March 9, 2014

Archiwum Państwowego in Gdańsk & Pomorskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne – 650,000 records scanned/online

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PTG

Stanczyk has news of yet another Polish Archive scanning and going online with vital records (older than 100 years).

The Pomeranian – Gdansk Archive will soon have 650,000 vital records scanned and online by the 2nd qtr this year.

The AP-GDANSK are working with Pomeranian Genealogical Society who already have 2.78Million records indexed and now will get 650,000 scanned images to go with index.

The National Archive (Gdansk) and Genealogical Society will share the online indexes/scans.

Something else to be thankful for this Easter/Passover season.

PomGenBase / PomGenBaza is here … :http://www.ptg.gda.pl/index.php/ptgnews/action/basesearch/

For more details, the full article can be read here [in Polish /po polskiu].

Archive – Archiwum Państwowego w Gdańsku (AP-Gdansk)

Genealogical Society – Search The Pomorskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne (PTG), which in English translates to the Pomeranian Genealogical Association

February 28, 2014

GenBaza — Jewish Congregations (AP Kielce, AP Sandomierz) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been writing about metryki.genbaza.pl a lot this year and this week in particular. Since I wrote my guide on using GenBaza, I thought I might start enumerating what is actually in GenBaza. So to honor my wife, I thought I would start with the Jewish records.

I compiled my list from two of the archives that I dabble in: AP Kielce and AP Sandomierz.  This roughly covers the area that a genealogy group on the Internet known as KR SIG/ Kielce-Radom Special Interest Group (are they defunct now?  — see JewishGen/JRI-Poland have their materials) used to do research on.

Today’s blog is almost a Wordless Friday blog. I see from the embedded pictures (below) that AP Kielce has 10 congregations data and AP Sanodmierz has 13.KielceRadom

AP_Kielce_mojAP_Sandomierz_moj

February 27, 2014

Guide (Poradnik) for Using Metryki.GenBaza.PL — #Polish, #Archive, #Guide, #Poradnik

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wrote about  metryki.genbaza.pl two months back and the fact they were posting online the state archives (civil) and church archives (diocese) and many people have asked me to write a guide (poradnik) on how to use  Metryki.GenBaza.pl  .

In this guide, I will be using a Macbook laptop with the Safari browser, but you should see just about the same thing with your PC or your browser. Obviously, if you are using a mobile device you user experience will be slightly different may not work if your smartphone is too small.

Œ Œ

Step By Step


Step 1

Step One

            Go to the website: Metryki.GenBaza.pl 

You should see the web site with just the GRODZISK archive shown …

01_Metryki.GenBaza_plYou will need to register for a free account in order to see of the available archives on metryki.genbaza.pl . The link to create a free account will take you back to GenPol.pl and you will need to fight your way through their poor user interface. Their interface (web app) did not indicate to me when it had created the account. But if you go back to metryki.genbaza.pl and click on the Login, you should be able to login to genbaza (using your email and your newly created password). If you are on a mobile device or a small/minimal browser window and do not see Login , then you should see a graphic button with three horizontal lines in upper right corner click on this followed by clicking on Login .

Now that you are logged in to genbaza you should see the following archives …

02_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_loggedIn

Small_2
 
Step Two — Select An Archive

            For this guide, we will be working with AD_Kielce and AP_Kielce and the parish named Biechow. From the above screen shot you can see that we will be using the 1st and the 3rd archives. So if you are following along, then click on AD_Kielce (the church archive -or- Archiwum Diocesan).

You should see …

03_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_ADKielce

Notice it gives you the feedback that you are working with the AD Kielce “Album” contents. Think of this as an iPhoto photo album. Down the left side you will see a list of all available parishes that they have scanned images for. This is NOT a complete list of all parishes in the old province (wojewodztwo or Russian Gubernia) of Kielce, but just the ones they have some subset of images from the Kielce church archive.

The blue words, Bebelno, Bejsce, Biechow … etc. are just parishes. You will need to know the parish of your ancestral village to select the appropriate parish, but that is another blog or two. Let me take one step back, I said parishes, but there are also Jewish congregations / records  too in these online images. These parishes are just sub-directories of the AD Kielce Album. If there had been an image file also, it would be listed on the right side under the Album (or sub-directory) as a set of JPG (graphic file) files that viewable in a browser.

Step 3
 
Step Three — Select A Parish (Congregation)

Let’s click on Biechow . You should see …

04_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_Biechow

You will notice that I have scrolled down a bit from the top. At the top it lets you know that you are in the Biechow Album (sub-directory). There are no files here either. But down the left we see more blue text (that are clickable). Ignore the leading number before the underscore. The middle part is a year or a year range.  The last part, when it is present, is a set of letters.

The latest birth I can get from the AD Kielce (church archive) is 1855. [see 22_1835-1855_ur]. So please excuse me while I switch over to  AP_Kielce in order to work with Biechow births (ur) for 1886.

Decoding the ‘Letters’

These letters (or suffixes if you prefer) are fairly standard (with exceptions). If you see a suffix of,  “_ur”,  that is an indication that when you click on that sub-directory you will find online scanned images of Births (urodzony). So these suffixes are Polish abbreviations for Birth (ur), Marriage (sl), Death (zg) or Alegata (al). Each describes the type images you will see. What if there is no suffix? Then you will probably see  all of the event types: Birth, Marriage, Death and possibly Alegata too.

What is an Alegata (al)? These scanned images are requests to the church for a transcription from the church book or to lookup something like a birth or death possibly or most commonly to support a person’s need to re-marry by showing that s/he is widowed. These are transcriptions copied from the actual church register, by the current pastor of a past event (birth/marriage/death). These are usually accompanied by a fee, collected via stamps on the actual page. If these are present with the other event types, then they are at the end of the images.  Alegata are almost as valuable as the actual church entry. But the alegata can substitute when you do not have the actual church register (or image) available to you.

By the way the final set of letters that I want to mention are, “_moj”. If you see “_moj” as a suffix then that directory’s scanned, online images are of Jewish denomination records. The Moj. is an abbreviation for  mojżeszowe (Mosaic denomination as in Moses),

If you are following along, then you will need to click on the following to switch to 1886 Biechow parish in AP Kielce Archive:

At the top click on “Main page” at the top, then click on AP_Kielce (on left the next page), followed by  clicking on Biechow,  and finally clicking on 1886_023. After all of those clicks you should see …

05_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886

Notice the website gives you a nice trail of breadcrumbs to find your way around all of these directories.  You should see between the top level and the “Album contents”, a line of clickable text:

GenBaza | AP Kielce | Biechow | 1886_023

These are your breadcrumbs that allow you to find your way back. Keep in mind that “Main page” at the top will always bring you back to the original set of Archives to pick from.

 
 Step 4
Step Four — Working With A List of Images

            On the right side you see Album Contents: 1886_023 with a list of scanned images named like :

_k_??????.jpg — where the ?????? are replaced by some consecutive numbers. These files contain one scanned image each. Typically the set of images is a parish register, including the front and back covers, such as they may be. So in practice I seldom look at the first or the last image, because I am too busy to look at book covers.

The images are number consecutively from front cover to last cover with all the pages in between as they are. There are a few possible arrangements of pages. Typically it is Births, then Marriage, then Deaths if the particular register you are looking at has two or more event types. I also see Marriage, then Birth, then Death. Death comes last always. In some parish registers you will also see Alegata and these come after Death if they exist.  Many times Alegata are in their own directory apart from the other vital record events.

Our goal is to avoid having to look at all pages one after another. To do that we must find the indexes that follow each vital record event. For example, after the Births, you usually find a page or two (or more) of an index of all of the births for that year — hopefully in alphabetical order. Sometimes the indexes do not exist. Sometimes the indexes have errors and sometimes a mistake is found and added at the end of the index. Always seek  out the index and look at ALL index pages for your surname(s) to catch these errors.

For this exercise I am going to click on the 27th file, named: _k_088054.jpg . I knew that this file contained the birth index scanned image. It is here that I want to say a few things about working with the scanned images. So clicking on _k_088054.jpg, you should see …

06_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886IndexUR_27

OK the text is in RUSSIAN/Cyrillic handwriting. Many of you cannot read this image. But some images are in Polish and a few are in Latin. So you can usually find somebody who reads these if you cannot read them yourself. But I do urge you to get the Jonathan Shea/Fred Hoffman book, “In Their Own Words” books and learn to read these church records.

In the upper left you will see two tool pallets. The top tool is for adjusting (from top to bottom):  Contrast, Brightness and Zoom. Mostly, you will not need to adjust Contrast or Brightness, but they are there for those who know how to use them to make the scanned images more readable. I do use the Zoom adjustments all of the time. The zoom tool (the bottom pick with a ‘magnifying glass’), you can zoom in (+) or zoom out (-). Depending on the scale of the image scanned and the health of your eyes, you will need to zoom in (+) 4 – 6 times to get a comfortable level of reading. Your eyes may differ.

As you zoom in, you will notice that a gray box in the preview too pallet  gets smaller.  This gray transparent rectangle is the area of image displayed in the viewer window. You can drag this gray square to quickly navigate the viewer window to area of the page I have focused on. The other method of navigating the image is to click on the image viewer, click-and-hold-and drag the image around. So whether you drag the gray box in the preview or click-drag (common called grab) the view image around make it so you can see the Russian ‘L’ and possibly Russian M on the index screen.

NOTE: You can scroll the viewer left-right and up-down, but I would not do that as you may not realize that you have NOT reached the image’s edge and that you need to click-drag some more to move the image to see the remainder of the image that scrolling cannot show you.

Now you my dear reader of this tutorial must indulge me. I want to call your attention to the 4th ‘L’ name in the image (лещунъска  виктория) — yeah, I know cursive Cyrillic does not look much like block letter Cyrillic characters, especially pre-1918 cursive Russian, which were before Bolshevik language reforms. It says, “Leszczynska Wiktorija” 118 (akt#) / 20 (Kart #). We use the Akt # as the record number in the parish register to find this record. This record is my grandmother!

Click on the 23. Do you see where it says “First photo  << 23  24  25   26  27 …  >> Last photo”? Click on the 23, which will take us 4 images before the image we are on (the gray highlighted 27 in the middle). You should see an image with a 124 in the upper left.  If you drag the image around in the viewer (or I find dragging the gray rectangle box in the preview tool) around the page you will see a total of 6 births on this page, number 124 through 129. The image looks like two pages of a parish register (book). The left page has records (akts) 124, 125, 126 and the right page has records 127, 128, 129.

We are looking for my grandmother who is act# 118. 118 is exactly 6 records before the first birth record shown on this page. Since we six births per page, my grandmother’s birth record should be the 1st record on the previous page. So let’s click on the 22 in the: “First photo  << 19  20  21   22  23 …  >> Last photo” near the top. After clicking on 22, you should see …

07_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886IndexAkt118

Do you see the Akt #118 at the upper left? We have found our record. These particular birth records list the baby’s name at the top. Do you see: Leszczynska Waleryja ? Wait a minute the index said, Wiktorija??? I said before the indexes contain errors. Waleryja Leszczynska is indeed my grandmother and I knew she was born in Biechow parish in 1886,  but it was not until GenBaza put the AP_Kielce images online that I actually could prove her birth date / place.  You can imagine my joy. Now imagine what your joy will be when you find your grandparents!

Notice there is a button at the top,  “Download photo” (Pobierz zdjęcie). The last thing you need to do is download this keepsake image you found.  On a Mac when you do this the image is downloaded to your “Downloads” folder. It also brings up a Preview of the image when the download completes. Close out of of Preview. In your browser is a new tab, “Untitled” with nothing in the window. Close this tab and you will be back in the image viewer tab.  In Windows you get a new browser window (named Untitled), your downloads  window opens and the images goes into whatever Windows directory you download into (typically called Downloads). Likewise, close the Untitled browser window and return to your previous browser window. One note, on the mac the image download is TIFF by default and in Windows it is JPG. So on the Mac when your Preview comes up … click on File menu, then Export menu item and select either PNG or JPEG to get a file format that you can use on the Internet (like on Ancestry.com) for example. The Internet browsers natively work with: JPG/JPEG, GIF or PNG (or PDF too). Keep your images in one of those formats.

There is one more thing I have yet to emphasize. I was trying to teach you that you can jump around the images by doing simple math. We were on Akt# 124 (of records 124 through 129) of six records per page. If my grandmother’s akt# had been 100 (instead of 118) then I would have had to click 4 pages left of page 23 or page 19 on the line,  “First photo  << 19  20  21   22  23 …  >> Last photo”. This little math tip can save you the time of scrolling page after page. I use this tip to navigate more than 4 pages at a time too, but I will leave that exercise for the reader to figure out.

February 24, 2014

#Polish #Genealogy Clever Workaround … Using Genealodzy.pl (Genteka) and GenBaza.pl Together

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ludwik Eliasz Marries Maryanna Wierzbocka

Stanczyk has been very busy researching in Genbaza.pl.

Ever since they posted online a significant cache of both Polish Archive in Kielce and the Church Diocesan Archive (also in Kielce) this jester has been busy examining the church registers and wading through Russian and Polish records alike.

So here is my simple tip to you. Use Geneteka database on genealodzy.pl as an index into many (not all) of the records that you may be able to find online for the Kielce Gubernia (old Wojewodztwo Kielce, now SwietoKrzyskie), like in mertyki.genbaza.pl for example. From my picture above you can see, I was searching in Olesnica for any Eliasz (aka Elijasz). Up popped a Ludwik Eliasz marrying a Maryanna Wierzbowska in 1902. It even gave me the Akt # (record number) 21. Let me just pop over to genbaza.pl and see what that record looks like and who is this Ludwik Eliasz. A quick check of AD Kielce (the Church Archive, showed no Olesnica scans online). Smugly, I just popped over to AP Kielce (the Civil Archives), but all they had was: OLEŚNICA_AL .

This jester was vexed. I had an index listing a record I wanted, but there were no scans online for the record. Let me explain, that OLESNICA_AL means that the online images are not Birth, Marriage or Death records. In fact they are Alegata records. These are the kind of routine administrative searches a church performs in its own parish books for a parishioner to document a marriage or a birth or a death for some civil? reason.

First off, this is a good time to mention that Geneteka database will have some records indexed that there are no scans for (my case) and the opposite also happens  that they do not have an index of a record that does exist online. Happily, most of what they have in indexes are also online so there are 1 to 1 matches between Geneteka and Genbaza.

Sadly, in my case they had no marriage scans online for Olesnica.

That is NOT the end of this story and so you get a second genealogy tip in this article. I said to myself if this is my LUDWIK ELIASZ, this would be a second marriage of his and therefore he would be a widower and have to have proof that he was widowed or divorced to marry a second wife. So … I said to myself,  then there should be an ALEGATA record documenting Ludwik’s first wife’s death in the 1902 Alegata of Olesnica.

The Alegata are not indexed; So I had to go record by record (image by image) in the 1902 Olesnica Alegata and examine each record in turn. Do you know what I found? This Ludwik had an alegata for his 1st wife’s death documenting his widower standing. This Ludwik was the widower of Elzbieta Miklaszewski Elijasz.  So my persistence had paid off. I now had an alegata, that was transcription of Elzbieta Miklaszewski Elijasz ‘s death (with death date / place). This was indeed my Ludwik Elijasz (brother of my great-grandfather Jozef Elijasz). Now I had the death date and place of his first wife Elzbieta. Persitence pays off!

Tip number three, keep going. I then looked at the next image and it was the alegata of  a death record extraction for Maryanna Wierbowska ‘s first husband. Oh, she was a widow, just like my great-grand uncle Ludiwk was a widower. So this was a second marriage for both. Oh, how nice — good for them. Keep going!  The next alegata was indeed the alegata of their marriage record in 1902! How cool was that? SO persistence did yield me my marriage record even though the marriage records were not online. Also, being a former stamp collector, I adore the stamps on the alegata (used as fees, I suppose) records. Here below is their marriage record from the alegata:

1902OlesnicaAlegata_Marr_LudwikEliasz_MaryannaWirzbocka

Click (and keep clicking) for a Full Size image (readable)

—  …

February 1, 2014

Rzeszow Galicia Cadastral Maps – Online in June

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

CadastreMapsRZESZOWStanczyk, was perusing the Polish Genealogical Society Connecticut & NorthEast Facebook page recently and noticed that on 27-January-2014 their posting on digitized cadastral surveys from the State Archives in Przemyśl . The  full text of the Polish State Archive (  http://www.archiwa.gov.pl ) news is posted  here.

By the end of June, the Przemyśl state archives will complete the digitization of Galician cadastral maps started in 2012 of 63,000 pages of descriptive material to the cadastral maps of the villages . The 63,000 pages accompanies 9,084 digitized map sheets of 743 localities of the former province of Rzeszow and 29 more localities now in Ukraine.

Digitized copies of the documents so far will be at the Przemysl archive by the end of March for  study. Afterwards, the scans will be published online at the site:  szukajwarchiwach.pl .

Also See …

Gesher GaliciaInventory of Galicia Cadastral Maps

January 23, 2014

GenBaza Has Kielce Gubernia / Wojewodztwo Records Online ! — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Kielce

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenBazaDateline: January 6th, 2014  — Stanczyk knows this is over two weeks old. First, I had to be alerted to the fact, then I had to verify the accuracy and availability. Finally, I had to see how much data is now online.

That is where the delay came in. Our Polish cousins in genealogical societies in Poland have succeeded into digitizing images from both the State Archives & the Diocessan Archives for the Gubernia / Wojewodztwo of Kielce. In truth they have done a bit more than Kielce (former woj. replaced by SwietoKrzyskie in today’s administrative structure in Poland).

It took me over two weeks to get the info and write this blog in large part because there was so much online and I found dozens of records of my direct line and their siblings. In fact this jester found his grandmother’s birth record — which was the biggest jewel I found in the pile of gems online (see picture at the end of the blog).

Please make yourself get access to this treasure and please think of donating to genealogical society:

Swietokrzyskie Genealogical Society /  Świętokrzyskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne

The list is too lengthy to provide in this blog post, but perhaps I will provide it in a future post. But the counts are below and those are just Kielce archives !

Details

GenBaza.pl – (URL: http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,62658,1 )

State Archives (AP) of Kielce – 91  parishes or miscellaneous curia errata available (23-JAN-2014)

Church Archives (AD) of Kielce – 126 parishes or miscellaneous curia errata available (23-JAN-2014)

— — — — — — — — — — — — —

Access

You must register, which is free, to even see the data that is online and to access it. Otherwise you will only see:

  • AP Grodzisk

But, if you register and login to GenBaza, then you will see:

Today’s blog is about AD Kielce (the church archives) and AP Kielce (the state archives). The data encompasses the timespan of the individual holdings at the particular archives for that particular parish (or synagogue), but most data is in the range:  1875-1908. The records are in Russian (Cyrillic) in this time period. But often, you will find Latin records (in the Latin Box/Table format) and those are easier to read. The records are the birth / marriage / death (urodziny /malzenstwo / zgony), but there are also alegata.  The alegata are various church inquiries or interactions between parishes to confirm a congregant’s  standing or to provide/validate a birth/marriage or death event. These were documents that required fees of some sort be collected, so you will see colorful stamps in various amounts of various empires in these records ! Stamp collectors will relish the alegata for these images alone.

This range typically overlaps with the Polish immigration that took place during the Great Immigration period of the USA. So this is the bridge data that will connect your first generation American ancestor to his/her roots back in Poland !

It looks like I will be busy for a few months. But I will leave you with a sample church birth record of my Busia (babcia), Waleryja Leszczynska born in Biechow (Akt #118) .

Waleryja

September 24, 2013

The Library of Congress & PA State Library — #Genealogy, #Archives, #Libraries

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PAStateLib_1PAStateLib_2

The Library of Congress

(LOC) has published a finding resource listing 71 links to the 50 states, online digital collections. That is found here .

The PA State Library — Has a digital collections, very similar to the digital collections found at seekingmichigan.org [Editor: also in LOC list for MI].

From Abe Lincoln, to Ben Franklin, to Coal Mining History, to WWI there are many PA treasures here:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/collections/8728/digital_collections_at_the_state_library_of_pennsylvania/524375

I chose to start in their WWI Collection,  which had a few choices to pick from, so I chose the top pick (Mahanoy City):

American Red Cross. Pennsylvania Chapter. Mahanoy City. In Memoriam Of Those Who, Coming from the District within the Limits of the Mahanoy City, Red Cross Chapter, Quakake to Girardville [inclusive] Made the Supreme Sacrifice in the Great War for Democracy, known as “The World War” 1917-1919. Mahanoy City, Pa., [1920]
This is a six page memorial to the fallen veterans who lived in Mahanoy City in the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania.

http://accesspadr.org/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/sstlp-wwi&CISOPTR=411&CISOSHOW=405

In truth the PA State Library’s digital collection is large enough that this jester will need to spend some time exploring, but I thought I would share my initial impression.

So LOC, a tip of the jester’s hat  to you for compiling a very useful resource of state libraries who have online digital collections. These are historical in nature, but the obvious application to genealogy make these valuable resources to the genealogical researcher too.

August 30, 2013

Gesher Galicia — Tabula Register — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish, #Ukrainian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GesherGaliciaGesher Galicia has really been adding content and also a website redesign of late. I am planning on joining this genealogical society. The reason is their projects and current databases, maps, and variety of resources that can aid all genealogists and especially Jewish Genealogists with family from the former Galicia region (now western part in Poland, eastern part in Ukraine) of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire (aka Hapsburg). So Ukrainian and Polish genealogists take note!

This little tidbit was found because of a PGSCT&NE posting in Twitter/Facebook. So keeping tabs on events in social media (or reading this blog) can keep you informed on the latest contributions by genealogists, the world over. Follow these societies and join them and volunteer your time. I am sure Gesher Galicia members knew about this and active meeting goers may have been informed, but it is now the Internet/Cloud that keeps the vast majority of genealogists informed and involved. Keep up the good work!

The Gesher Galicia website has an article by Alexander Dunai. Alexander also has another, more complete article on his website which you should go read ( http://alexdunai.com/documents/item_11/) on Tabula Registers and their purpose, plus a list of towns is available with this genealogy resource at URL:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/galitzianer/tabula-registers-an-untapped-genealogical-resource-in-the-lviv-archives/

The list of towns from that article with Tabula Registers for the Villages and Towns of Galicia:

 Bandrow  Bania Kotowska  Belz (15 vols)
 Berwinkowa  Bialoberezka  Bialogora
 Bialy Kamien  Blyszczywody (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Bolechow
 Bolehowce  Brody (32 vols, 1794-1884)  Bronica
 Brzegi Dolne  Brzezany (12 vols)  Buda (incl. in Wysoka)
 Busk (5 vols)  Cholojow  Chorocowa
 Chyrow  Czajkowice  Dobra
 Dobrohostow  Dobromyl (16 vols)  Dobrzanica (incl. in Uszkowice)
Dolhopol  Dolina (10 vols)  Dolina area villages (incl. in Lopianka)
 Drohobycz & suburbs (81 vols)  Dunajow vicinity villages
 Dynow (3 books, 1780-1825)
 Engelsbruk  Falkenberg  Falkenstein
 Folwarki Wielke & Folwarki Male  Gaje Starobrodskie  Gerynia (incl. in Witwica)
 Gleboka  Gliniany (8 volumes)  Grodek Jagiellonski (11 volumes 1797-1880)
 Halicz (10 vols. 1753-1886)  Holowy  Hoszow
 Hoszow (incl. in Stankowce)  Hrusatycze (incl. in Strzeliska)  Hubice
 Huczko  Jagielnica  Jaroslaw (50 vols. 1792-1892)
 Jasien  Jasienica  Jasienica Solna
 Jaworow (9 vols. 1792-1893)  Jozefow  Kalusz (7 vols. 1758-1822)
 Kamionka Strumilowa (21 books)  Katyna  Kimirz
 Kniahinin (4 vols. 1801-1885)  Kniazpol  Kobasz
 Kolomyja (30 volumes)  Kolpiec  Komarno
 Korostow  Kotacin  Krakowiec
 Krasnoila  Krechow  Kropiwnik Nowy & Stary
 Krystynopol (7 vols. 1792-1883)  Kulczyce  Kulikow
 Kurowice  Kuty (18 vols, 1781-1888)  Kwaszenina
 Lacke  Liskowate  Liszczyny
 Lisznia  Lopianka  Lodyna
 Lopuszanka  Lopusznica  Lubycza Krolewska
 Makow  Mariampol (3 vols, 1807-1855)  Migowo
 Mizun  Modrycz  Mokrotyn
 Mokrotyn, Smerekow, Przedrzymichy, & Blyszczywody  Muzylowice  Nadziejow (incl. in Lopianka)
 Nahujowice  Nanow  Narajow
 Neudorf (incl. in Bolechowce)  Niedwedza  Nojdorf (incl. in Zawidowice)
 Nowe Miasto (1 volume)  Obersdorf  Olesko (3 vols, 1798-1882)
 Orow  Paprotno  Plebania
 Polana  Potylicz  Powitno
 Prochnik (14 vols, 1814-1874)  Przerzymichy (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Przemysl with suburbs (56 vols, 1799-1894)
 Przemyslany (11 vols, 1816-1881)  Radziechow (2 vols, 1827-1874)  Raniowice
 Rawa Ruska (12 vols, 1796-1882)  Rodatycze  Rogozno
 Rozenburg  Rozen Maly and Rozen Wielki  Roztoki
 Roztoczki (incl. in Witwica)  Rudawka  Rudki (4 vols)
 Rybno with Slobodka  Rybotycze  Rymanow with neighboring villages (6 vols, 1782-1888)
 Sambor & neighboring villages (69 volumes)  Sielec  Smereczna
 Smerekov (incl.  Mokrotyn)  Slobodka  Smolnica
 Smolno  Sniatyn (vols, 1791-1832)  Sokal (vols. with index)
 Solec  Sopotnik  Stainfeld
 Stanila with Stebnik and Kolpets  Stanislawow & suburbs (99 vols. 1784-1882)  Stankowce with Hoszow
 Stare Miasto  Stary Sambor  Starzawa Sanocka
 Stebne with Dolhopol  Stebnik  Strzeliska Nowe and Stare
 Sulukow (incl.  Lopianka)  Szmankowce  Tarnawa
 Tartakow (1 vol. 1817-1883)  Tarnopol city (50 vols.).  Trebowla (12 vols. 1803-1886)
 Truskawiec (incl. Tustanowice)  Tudiow  Tustanowice (1802-1889)
 Tyzlow  Uhnow  Ulyczno
 Untervalden (incl. in Uszkowice)  Ustrzyki Dolne (1855-1880)  Uszkowice
 Warez  Wierzblany  Witkow Nowy
 Witwica incl. Roztoczki & Gerynia  Wojnilow (3 vols, 1652-1839)  Wolica
 Wysocko  Wysoka & Buda  Wyzniany & vicinity
 Zablotow (3 vols)  Zaleszczyki (4 vols)  Zawidowice & Nojdorf
 Zbadyn  Zbaraz (8 vols)  Zloczow (50 vols)
 Zolkiew (24 vols)  Zoltantce  Zurawno (2 vols)
 Zydaczow (8 vols)

Thank You

Thank you, Alexander Dunai,  for this fine piece of research. I will be visiting your website and taking a further look at your other efforts too. Very nice website!

August 21, 2013

#Meme – Things I Find While Looking Up Other Things — #Declaration, #Independence, #History, #Picture

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

IMG_0341Wordless Wednesday — Enjoy this document, that  I found at the Smithsonian. I do not think it dates back to the 1776 era, but it looks like late 19th century or early 20th century ephemera. It is beautiful. One question, though, “Why does John Hancock get billing on par with Washington and Jefferson?” The 13 original colonies are also pictured … just a beautiful replica of the U.S.  Declaration of Independence !

July 14, 2013

A Bit of Blog Bigos … #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy since the 4th of July! So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my blog.

bigos_huntersstewA bit of bigos (recipe) !!

Let me point out that in June the Polish Archive completed their latest update on: ♥ http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/ .

Unfortunately, it did not include anything from the old wojewodztwo: Kielce (now in SwietoKrzyskie). See the image of the drop down menu below (not full listing but to give you an idea on what is in and how that is somewhat limited for researchers like Stanczyk. I hope another phase will commence soon!

 

SzukajArchiwum_June

Meanwhile on:

♥  genealodzy.pl – They added the death records from 1875-1908 for Pacanow parish to their Geneszukach database. Previously they had added the Birth and Marriage records. These are transcription / indexes, not actual church record images such as you find in their Metryki database.

Still I have found dozens of Eliasz (and … Gawlik, Gronek, Hajek, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Major, Paluch, Wlecial, Zasucha, etc.) that I was previously unaware of. Now I will need to get the actual images in order to make sense of these indexes and the new people in order to add them to the family tree.

Enjoy the bigos. Smaczne (delicious)!

June 2, 2013

Polish Vital Records On-line — A Survey #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Metryka_Urodzenia_Births

Stanczyk is a bit uncertain. It seems like every day there are some new vital records indexes or even actual register scans themselves made available from congregations all over the Central European — Jewish, Catholic (Roman & Greek), Orthodox, Lutheran/Evangelical lands that make up Poland or a land that was once within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the 1st Republic) or any of the variations between those times. So I thought I would step back and take stock of what was available. Yes, I know this will be out of date by tomorrow. But here is a quick & dirty, handy reference list of where to go looking. Clip & Save.

Cut— — — — — — — — — —

Poland – Archives & Genealogical Societies

AGAD Księgi metrykalne – Eastern Borderlands (Ukraine, Russia Jewish Pale, etc.) —

http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/testy.html

(scans by Sygn.: http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/KMLw301.html#idp1765776 )

Prussian Poland Parishes

BASIA – http://www.basia.famula.pl/en/ – State Archives in Poznan, the Wielkopolska Genealogical Society (WTG “Gniazdo”) project.

Poznan Marriage Project – http://poznan-project.psnc.pl/

Pomorskie Towarzstwo Genealogiczne – http://www.ptg.gda.pl/

All Poland & Eastern Borders (PTG)

GeneSzukacz  / Geneteka (indexes, some scans) –  http://www.geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl/      &      http://geneteka.genealodzy.pl/

METRYKI (parish register scans)– http://metryki.genealodzy.pl/

Szukajwarchiwach (Poland’s National Archives online) – http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/

This is the latest project and is shooting to have 5.8 Million records by the end June (this month) scanned and on-line by Polish Archive or National Museum.

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) – http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

The venerable project with new life provides indexes to registered users (free) and then you can purchase the actual church record. Great for Jewish Pale & Russian Poland, plus so much more.

Metryk.GenBaza.pl – http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,4,1 (AP GRODZISK). Archive in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Russian Poland parishes near Warsaw).

Family Search.Org 

Besides the 5 parishes below, you might want to have a look at holdings for:

Austria, Germany, Russia & Ukraine

Poland, Częstochowa Roman Catholic Church Books, 1873-1948 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Gliwice Roman Catholic Church Books, 1599-1976 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Lublin Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 99,510 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 18,916 21 Apr 2013
Poland, Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books, 1612-1900 1,002,155 6 Jan 2012

Did I miss any? Email Me … Proszę !

Other (Inne)

http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php – from Valerie Warunek (PGSM). Database of Indexed church records (birth/urodzenia, marriage/malzenstwa,  death/zgony) from Lubelskie wojewodztwo. No scans (skans), but it does have record (akt) #’s.

May 21, 2013

Pacanow 1875-1908 Index

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St. Martin -  Pacanow Church about 1918

St. Martin – Pacanow Church about 1918

Stanczyk, has been sifting through the Index created on genealodzy.pl in their Geneszukacz database. Alright, only the Births Index, so far.

I see they have a total of nearly 7,300 people from those years (1875-1908) in their Birth Index. From Adam … Żyp . There were 58 ELIASZ in their index.Notice they used ELIASZ and not ELIJASZ. I found that interesting. They removed ‘J’ when they produced the index. Was that an error? Or was the indexer an expert? Because, in my heart of hearts, I believe the name (at least back to 1690) was ELIASZ.

It was only since 1869 when the Russian Empire forced Poland to keep records in Russian (Cyrillic) that the ‘J’ appeared from the Russian character ‘я’ (Ya) that ELIASZ became элияшъ .  элияшъ is transliterated in a Latin alphabet as ‘Elijasz’.

I only wanted to mention this as while I believe the translated properly produced the index with respect to ELIASZ; You will need to realize that finding the record in Russian/Cyrillic, you will need to look for a different translation (i.e. ELIJASZ/элияшъ) in the indexes and the actual church records.

So now I have an index of ELIASZ born in Pacanow in the years 1875-1908. Now what? I compared the list of 58 with what I already had/knew. I saw an overlap of 22 people. So I have 36 new ELIASZ to resolve and add into the family tree. My options are:

  1. Write to Pacanow parish and request specific records (since I have year, Akt#),  
  2. Write to Polish National Archive (again with detailed info),
  3. Hire a genealogist in Poland,
  4. Go on a genealogical tour to Poland.

The year range 1875-1908 is not completely in LDS microfilm. Although 1875-1884 is in LDS MF #’s:

1192351 Item 10,    1192352 Items 1-2,   1807621 Items 8-11,    1807622 Items 1-3

So doing research in a local Family History Center or at the Family History Library (Salt Lake) is not an option for the remaining 36. So I now have better options for remote research.

My List of 58 ELIASZ.

April 14, 2013

A Church Register Novelty in Koprzywnica — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poland_1807_1815_AnnotatedIn another case of finding something interesting whilst researching something else, I found a type of Church Register Index that I have not seen before in any other parish. So today’s blog is about that novel index I found. See the Church Register in the picture (see below).

Dateline Koprzywnica parish, 1810 – In what was after the 3rd partition was Austrian-Hungarian territory (Austrian-Poland in green), has now been annexed by Napoleon in 1809 into the Duchy of Warsaw and in another five years will be Congress Poland (Vistulaland, Russian-Poland). But in 1810 we are speaking of Koprzywnica in the powiat of Staszow and the Departement of Radom. No, that is not wojewodztwo — it is the French, Departement that is the highest level of administration in the Duchy of Warsaw. The map shows that a huge swath of green from the  Austrian-Poland partition (zabior) was annexed into the Duchy in 1809. Stanczyk’s own ancestors once again switched Empires from Austria to France. So too did the citizens of Koprzywnica (and a great many cities, towns, and villages). Poof, now the records go from Latin, in the perfunctory Latin Box (Table) Format to the lingua franca of Polish paragraph with French-style two witnesses.

So Koprzywnica, like Stanczyk’s own ancestral Villages (Biechów and Pacanów) was briefly Austrian, then French (very briefly), then Russian until 1917-1918 whence it became just Poland again. We can find Koprzywnica in the gazetteer, Skorowidz Miejscowoscy Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej as being in the powiat Sandomierz, wojewowdztwo Kielce (circa 1920’s/1930’s).

Indexes are so very helpful. It is always a let down when a parish book or a year within the book lacks any kind of index. That means I will have to look at each and every record to see if any are related to me / my research. Early Latin paragraph form church records often do not have any index  — they barely denote the year change. So that means you have to read each and every badly handwritten paragraph of Latin — very rare to find a priest with good Latin handwriting. That is why the Latin Box Format was more welcome. At least I could find the pieces of info and the handwriting was less of an issue. But the Latin Box format did not have indexes either.

So it was helpful when Napoleon implemented the Codex Napoleon in the Duchy of Warsaw. So by 1810 you see the records written in Polish (lingua franca) in a paragraph form that is specified by the Codex Napoleon. And these new records have indexes!

OK, the indexes initially are by letter: A, B, C, …, Z. So you have just under 26 pages of indexes. It is an improvement. Quickly the church realizes it can save paper by running the index all together with all letters on a single (or a few) page(s) in order alphabetically. Very efficient to scan these indexes for your families. And it was also easy to spot when a priest added a late addition to the index at the back after all other names (even though it was evidently in the wrong spot lexicographically speaking).

OK 1868-1918, we find Russian / Cyrillic indexes. In addition to priests not knowing Russian well and ordering names phonetically before later on,  we find the index in Cyrillic proper lexical order you will have to scan carefully. Cyrillic kind of forces that to those of us weaned on a Latin alphabet. But you sometimes find the Russian indexes sorted in Cyrillic lexical order … by the first name ??? That is not very useful. Sometimes the index is in chronological order (akt # / record # order) making it barely more useful then scanning every record.

But when we find a well formed index (or a not so good index) it is always for one event: Birth/Christening, Marriage / Marriage Banns, Death Records. One index for Births, one for Marriages and one for Deaths … assuming none are missing, 3 indexes. That is what makes the following index so very interesting …

The Index (Skorowidz)

1810KoprzywnicaINDEX_pg4_JewishNames_righthalf This was supposed to be a Marriage Index !! But it was five scanned pages! This would have to be an extraordinarily large city to have that many marriages! What are all of those columns ?? That is what I asked myself.

Let’s see what those columns are:  Record # (Akt #), Village Name, Person Name(s), Births (Urodzin), Deaths (Zeyscie), Banns (Zapowiedz), and finally Marriages(Malzenstwa) Kart # (you can safely ignore). This index is an all event index. Births-Deaths-Banns-Marriages all interleaved. In fact, when I look at each event (B/M/D) I see the same 99 event-record pages and the same five index pages. It appears that all events are in the same register! This is rather unique — as I said previously I have not seen this before in other parish registers I have seen.

So in this “combo style” index (which needs a proper name) you cannot have a single name  for marriage record, so marriage records have two names (as usual), but this requires two lines in this style of index — since we are multi-columnar. We also see that Banns are indicated ‘I‘ or ‘II‘ — the third bann being the actual marriage itself. The Roman numeral written above the word Zapowiedz. So since the index is in Akt# order, it is a chronological order too. It could be interesting from a demographic perspective (what time of year do most marriages occur or  do a higher concentration of deaths occur in winter months). If this style index had occurred during an epidemic year, then we could have seen all of the deaths occurring in a great streak without interruption by other events. 1810 in Koprzywnica was not such an epidemic year.

There is one more fascinating aspect to this index. In the Napoleonic era (1807 thru 1829) we find that Catholic priest acts as the civil administrator and that Jewish/Evangelic/Orthodox vital records are written in the Catholic register. How is this noted in the index — which again I have not seen elsewhere? Look at the scanned register image for this blog. Pay attention to Records #’s:

85, 86, and 91.

It so happens that each of these records is a Marriage Banns event type. But, notice that each begins ‘Zyda‘.  Żyd = Jew, hence Żyda is plural for Jews. Żydów = Jewish. This indicates that this is a Jewish civil record being recorded.  Now I know that Jewish vital records are recorded in the Napoleonic era Catholic registers. But it is unusual that it is indicated in the index (as opposed to being in the record itself).

So this was a very fascinating find after all. I was actually looking for a particular Leszczyński but I found a novel index and indeed a novel parish register overall.

Related Posts

The Fourth Partition (23 January 2013) – A Discussion of the Duchy of Warsaw, with a map

Historical Eras of Poland (21 January 2013) – A set of Stanczyk defined eras of Poland of particular use to genealogists. An historical definition of Poland’s eras (1569-present) based upon history’s impact on genealogical research.

 

Post Scriptum

The index from this column was found in the Polish website: genealodzy.pl (PTG) of which I written many times before. Their METRYK project of scanned church books is where I found the 1810 Koprzywnica Index.

April 6, 2013

Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) — #Genealogy, #Jewish, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RemembranceHolocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) 2013 begins in the evening of: Sunday, April 7
and ends in the evening of: Monday, April 8. In the Hebrew Calendar is 27 Nisan (see Stephen Morse’s Jewish Calendar Conversion tool) is Yom HaShoah and varies in the Gregorian calendar across the Months of April/May.

To honor my wife Teréza and our children let me add a Jewish Genealogy blog post. It is for a Polish village in the AP Grodzisk (Warsaw, Blonie) and is called: Góra Kalwaria. Góra Kalwaria can be found in PRADZIAD database. What is great about this news is that there is yet another project beyond the ones I have previously written about (SzukachwArchiwum.pl and Metryk in PTG). This village and its images can be found in: Metryki.GenBaza.pl (AP Gordzisk) for :

This is just one of many congregations (Catholic & Jewish) that they have scanned. There appear to be about 110 villages in total so far this Polish National Archive in Grodzisk (a branch office of Warsaw).  I picked this village because it is all about the Jewish congregation (that I provided the Pradziad link for). The records run from 1826 – 1910 inclusive and there no missing years. This is a remarkably complete/intact record of a Jewish congregation in Poland. The scanned records from 1826-1867 are written in Polish and then starting in 1868 the records are written in Russian all the way through 1910.

So for the Jewish-Polish genealogists who read this blog, here is a treasure trove to research. In actuality, many of the 110 villages have Jewish records. Look for the abbreviation ‘moj’ (short for mojżeszowe). So I hope this is a joyful news for the remembrance of this solemn occasion.

Good genealogy to all my readers!

–Stanczyk

.

April 5, 2013

AP Kielce, An Inventory of the National Archive in Kielce, Poland — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

APKielce

From a forum at genealodzy.pl  Stanczyk saw a PDF document mentioned. When I looked at it, I saw it was an inventory (in progress) of the holdings of  the National Archive in Kielce (AP w Kielcach). So I have produced a condensed version of their work-in-progress. Yes, most of these are related to Stanczyk’s family tree. For their complete inventory list (which was 424 items), see the link (URL) at the bottom of this table.

Now I mention this particular AP (National Archive) because it is the archive that covers the Russian-Poland partition that my ancestors were from. There may be other inventories for other archives.

AP KIELCE

 # Nr zespołu – # Rec. Group Stan na dzień (as of) 2013-02-01 Nazwa daty skrajne – date range księgi – books metry ilość sfotografowanych ksiąg – number of books photographed ilość zrobionych zdjęć – number of photos taken Braki – deficiencies
1 388 Beszowa 1875-1911 54 71 58 3770 oddział Sandomierz
2 341 Biechów 1875-1908 55 0.83 55 2 538
3 146 Kazimierza Wielka 112 1.03
4 353 Oleśnica 1875-1911 61 0.97 69 3 506
5 812 Opatów 1825,1890-1906 14 0.39 11 2369 oddział Sandomierz
6 152 Opatów 120 1.31
7 658 Opatów-gr 1834-1836 4 0.04 4 36 oddział Sandomierz
8 44 Opatów-moj 1831-1910 46 0.95 47 6860 oddział Sandomierz
9 814 Opatów-pr 1896-1915 19 0.23 20 573 oddział Sandomierz
10 871 Ożarów 1890-1910 3 0.06 4 445 oddział Sandomierz
11 45 Ożarów-moj 1826-1909 43 0.61 43 3419 oddział Sandomierz
12 355 Pacanów 1875-1908 62 0.91 64 3 703
13 373 Pacanów moj 51 0.76
14 245 Połaniec 1810-1910 106 2.05 106 12507 oddział Sandomierz
15 252 Połaniec-moj 1826-1910 88 0.99 92 3425 oddział Sandomierz
16 246 Staszów 1810-1910 103 1.65 103 10146 oddział Sandomierz
17 253 Staszów-moj 1826-1910 84 1.33 86 6236 oddział Sandomierz
18 362 Stopnica 48 0.88
19 374 Stopnica moj 46 1.29
20 582 Stopnica pr 3 0.02
21 97 Tumlin 189 1.67
22 370 Zborówek 1875-1908 58 0.66 65 2 295

Source: http://s6.genealodzy.pl/pliki/asc/apkielce.pdf

I tried to provide a reasonable translation (using Google Translator with some hand-tweaks) of the Polish Column Headings in English.

LEGEND (3rd Column):

A suffix of moj or -moj indicates Jewish records.

pr – Orthodox Catholic

ew – Evangelical

gr – Greek Orthodox

The rest (or any with  rk) would indicate Roman Catholic.

I believe the Column Heading METRY indicates the actual shelf space of storage this record group physically occupies. I believe the units would be in Meters (m). Remember Europe uses ‘,’ where America uses a decimal point. Some appear to be missing the decimal point. In most cases, it appears that Excel has translated the comma to decimal point, but if you look at the source document, you should be aware of this cultural difference.

April 4, 2013

Archiwum Państwowe w Suwałkach in Szukajwarchiwach.PL — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Over the last few weeks we have been discussing about Szukajwarchiwach.pl, the Polish website for “searching in archives” of the 2.4 Million Archive Images of historical vital records. So today we will look at the Suwalki Archive (Archive #63,  http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/63#tabZasoby), in particular the WIZAJNY parish in which this jester has previously plumbed (for NARKIEWICZ / SZCZESNY).

WizajnySuwalki

First off, please take note of the two red circles in the image. The first red circle around the drop down menu is set to ’15’ by default. I usually choose the drop down value ‘100’. This drop down menu controls how many ‘Units’ are displayed on each page.  So in order to minimize the number of pages and to maximize the number of items on each page, I routinely pick the ‘100’ from the drop down on each page.

Second, I was searching for WIZAJNY parish, But what I got/found was WIZAJNACH. You need to learn to recognize the root of the proper names/nouns in Polish. Fred Hoffman/Jonathan Shea call this applying the “chopping block” to get to the root of a word. So in the second red circle we find Wizajnach. That is the unit we wish to search.

Now notice the last column shows ‘5124’ (on 3 April 2013). This number is the number of “sheets” that have been scanned. So you should think images. The concept to take away is that if you see a ZERO, then there is nothing scanned; Try again later.  But in our case we should expect 5,124 images were scanned across the year range:  1808-1905.

If you want to follow along, I picked the year 1822 which 86 scanned images and selected ‘100’ scanned images from the drop down which effectively shows all 86 scans one page. These 86 images are actually “thumbnail” images that you click on to see …

Wizany1822Births

At the bottom of the image are two circles/icons. The ‘Z’ circle gives you a kind of magnifying glass for seeing a small part of the image, zoomed-in.

It is the other icon that we wish to click on (the square with the arrows at each corner, left of the ‘Z’). This icon left of the ‘Z’ pops up a window of the image more full sized. This full-sized image can be interacted with, zooming or panning or dragging the image around the viewing window. Please, note that at the bottom of this pop-up viewer window is a link you can click on to ‘Download‘ the scanned image to your hard-drive. So when you find your ancestor, you can download his/her scanned vital record.

Before I bring this post to a close. I wanted to point out how you can find the indexes (usually after the last record). This era of the 1820’s, the indexes are usually alphabetical with one letter per index page. So these kind of indexes look as shown below. You need to find the ‘Akt #’ in the index and then go to the scan that has the image of this Akt. The Akt #’s are on the outside of each image. They are on the left for the left-hand page and on the right for the right-hand page in the image scans.

IndexPages

As I mentioned in a prior blog article, the Wizajny parish is amazingly complete. It was also interesting because its records switch over in mid-year 1868. So you can see the records in Polish in early 1868, then in Russian starting in mid 1868. There are no Wizajny or even Suwalki records in genealodzy.pl (Metryk or Geneszukach) databases.

JEWISH GENEALOGISTS

Zydow

Please note that in the Napoleonic era (about 1807-1829), the Catholic parishes in Poland  were required to record the vital records for all faiths. So you will find Jewish birth / marriage / death records in the Catholic parishes books, if there were Jewish families in that area. For example, Akt #39 appears to be a Jewish birth record. Usually that is indicated in the text, but I did not see in Akt #39, BUT … if you look to the right of the record at the image on the left  (you will see a ‘Zydow’ column with a ‘1’ in it) …

Prior Related Stanczyk Articles …

A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik

Polish State Archives – Numbers

Russian Poland 1867-1875

April 2, 2013

Jan III Sobieski … — Things I Find Whilst Looking Up Other Things

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Chocim 1673

Jan III Sobieski – Victorius at Chocim 1673

Stanczyk ,

AngelicCrownOfVictory is a big fan of Jan III Sobieski. Today’s meme, a continuing meme in this blog came about because Valerie Warunek had posted about Digital Library of Polish and Poland Related News Pamplets.  That mention of a new library launched me on another research adventure. When I was looking up other things in Leszno, for Hyam Salomon, I found a Latin text related to Jan Sobieski. This jester loves Jan Sobieski’s letters, particularly those to his beloved wife. This document recounted his victory of 1673 of the Battle of Chocim and was a missive to the pope. This would be a pattern for  King Jan III ‘s future battles — letters before and after battle. After the battle, a missive was sent to the pope. King Jan III was a good Catholic monarch.

He claimed the Triumphant Crown in the Name of Poland and the Polish Eagle.

Triumphant_AquilaPolona

My Latin is not sufficient to render the phrase to the left (I see Polish Eagle = Aquila Polona). But it was signed the Dragon.

Hmmm. Interesting.  I know the Transylvanians aided Jan III Sobieski. But I am supposing this is a reference to the Order of the Dragon, a monarchic chivalric order meant to defend Europe’s Christians (from the Ottoman Empire). This battle is a good 100 years after Vlad Tepes (“The Impaler”) aka known as Dracula, son of the Dragon (Vlad II). Vlad II was a member of the Order of the Dragon, but his son Vlad Tepes was not a member of the order. So my thesis is that Jan III Sobieski was a member of the monarchic Order or the Dragon. Note that Wladyslaw II (Jagiellonian dynasty — possible Columbus grandfather) was also a member. So perhaps there was a strong connection of this chivalric order to the kings of Poland.

So here are a list of (source: Wikipedia) …

Monarchic Chivalric Orders:

  • Late medieval monarchical orders (14th & 15th centuries attached to a monarch):
Order of Saint George, founded by Charles I of Hungary in 1325
Order of the Band, founded by Alfonso XI of Castile in ca. 1330
Order of the Garter, founded by Edward III of England in 1348
Order of the Star, founded by John II of France in 1351
Order of the Most Holy Annunciation, founded by Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy in 1362.
Order of the Ermine, founded by John V, Duke of Brittany in 1381: 1st order to accept Women.
Order of the Dragon, founded by Sigismund of Hungary in 1408.
Order of the Golden Fleece, founded by Philip III, Duke of Burgundy in 1430
Order of St Michel, founded by Louis XI of France in 1469
  • Post-medieval foundations of chivalric orders:
Order of Saint Stephen (1561)
Order of the Holy Spirit (1578)
Blood of Jesus Christ (military order) (1608)
Order of the Thistle (1687)
Order of Saint Louis (1694)
Order of Saint Stephen of Hungary (1764)
Order of St. Patrick (1783)
Order of Saint Joseph (1807)
  • Monarchical orders whose monarch no longer reigns but continues to bestow the order:
Order of the Golden Fleece (Austrian branch)
Order of the Holy Spirit
Order of Prince Danilo I (Montenegro)
Order of Saint Peter (Cetinje)
Royal Order of Saint George for the Defense of the Immaculate Conception (Bavaria)
Order of the Crown (Romania)
Order of Carol I (Romania)
Order of the Immaculate Conception of Vila Viçosa (Portugal)
Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George (Two Sicilies)
Order of the Eagle of Georgia (Georgia)
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