Archive for May, 2019

May 28, 2019

My 4th Cousin (once removed) Martha

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Martha’s Family
If Stanczyk may, let me gush over a 4th cousin who went to Poland & remembered this jester! Her name is Martha.

I did not know Martha’s family name from Pacanow. After we worked together I was surprised to see a connection between my 2x great-grandfather Jozef Elijasz and her ancestors! I even found one female, Salomea ELIJASZ that I previously did not know who had married into her family.

She traveled all around Poland meeting her family and doing tourist things. Then she visited the ancestral villages: Biechow & Pacanow (a shared ancestral village). The church pictures & cemetery pictures were sublime. We worked remotely on a church record & I was able to let her know about her friend’s ancestor (Dubiński) being born in Nowy Korczyn & they were able to make a quick jaunt down there for research. Genealogy is truly collaborative. I was envying my 4th cousin’s genealogical adventure.

Then she made her way to the AP Archive in Kielce. She took a ton of pictures and I was able to learn from her sharing her experience & expertise at AP Kielce. She took this jester’s wish list and made a HUGE dent with her finds! More on this tomorrow.

May 24, 2019

HIAS Example Image

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

HIAS

 

Yesterday, this jester wrote about HIAS or Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society.

So today I wanted to show an example document that you could find and help you in your research.

He did arrive on the SS Andalusia as specified in May 1907, from Marmoros to borther Simon in Wilkesbarre , PA (not Philadelphia). He was traveling as Wulf (not Shloima) Wolwowitz (close enough).

So beware the info may be a bit off.

 

May 23, 2019

Jewish Genealogy … Especially in Philadelphia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, is an expert in Polish Genealogy, for the Gubernia / Wojewodztwo Kielce (Kieleckie). However, good this jester’s  genealogical skills are in Polish genealogy, only a limited subset transfer to research in Jewish genealogy. Acquiring the Jewish genealogical skills to research, my wife’s (Tereza Eliasz-Solomon) family is another tool in my larger  slavic genealogical skills.

But I am always learning. So here for my own edification & to aid others here are the FamilySearch catalog results for immigration on:

HIAS, Hebrew Imm. Aid Society

Title

Description
Card file of detainee immigrants,1914-1921 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society card file
I-96, 1882-1929
American Jewish Historical Society
Immigrant records, 1884-1952 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Jewish immigrant aid societies’ records of
Jewish arrivals, 1913-1947
Port of Philadelphia.
Association for the Protection of Jewish Immigrants; Hebrew Sheltering and
Immigrant Aid Society of America; Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of
Massachusetts (Boston, Massachusetts); Hebrew Immigrants Protective
Association (Baltimore, Maryland)
Landing verification cards, 1907-1914 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Pennsylvania, various records : Greens and
Browns collection
Historical Society of
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Prepaid steamship ticket record,
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1906-1948
People’s Bank (Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania); Lipschutz Steamship Company (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Ticket purchase books and index, 1899-1930 Blitzstein Steamship Company
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Ticket purchase books, 1890-1934 Rosenbaum Steamship Company
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Records, 1884-1934 HIAS (Philadelphia) Records, 1884-1934

 

NOTE:

 Some are available online, some are only available digitally at FHC  or FHL, some are only available on microfilm at FHC or FHL.

 

 

 

 

 

May 20, 2019

Finding The Dead

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk ‘s wife, (moja żona, Tereza Eliasz-Solomon) is Jewish. Jewish genealogy is even harder then Polish genealogy … due to so much documentation being destroyed or too little remaining.

 

So I knew her paternal grandmother (Bessie Wolf). I knew of her brother Harry Wolf. I was pretty sure their father was Israel Wolf whose wife had many variations on her first name. I knew Harry’s wife’s name (Rose Itskowicz another family probably from Maramures region (modern day Romania and part now in Ukraine (Drahovo/Kovesliget). So with these tiny bits and records being added to the Internet (Ancestry, FamilySearch, JewishGen, etc.), I have been able to knit together a smallish narrative and more importantly enlarge it.

 

So I found a death certificate for Harry Wolf. I knew his wife, his birth (roughly), his death, his parents names. But I did learn his FINAL residence/address. I wrote it down (good genealogist) in the tree. I decide to look for his siblings on the basis of Wolf, died in Philly, with a father named ISRAEL. Just those bits and then proceed through each one and look at the mother’s name (for Nancy, Nessie, Gussie, etc.). 

 So I found a Samuel Wolf. I had Simon, Samuel, Max, Louis and my wife’s grandmother, Bessie. I never knew Samuel’s wife’s name. In Samuel’s death certificate, his wife precede him in death (pity, her name was needed). But he had the right parent names so I was getting comfortable. His birth location and birth date were in the tolerance for correct. So I was more comfortable. I looked at the Informant. His name was Harry Wolf. Unfortunately, Wolf is a common name in Philadelphia (Christian and Jewish families) and Harry & Samuel were common Wolf first names. Oh, the Informant’s address was there? Well what do you know it was the newly learned address for Harry Wolf (who died after his brother Samuel). So, I had reached 100% certainty now. Two death certificates juxtaposed against each other with slim tidbits of info and I had furthered my wife’s family history!

May 19, 2019

#Meme — Things I Find Whilst Searching For Other Things

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Joseph Conrad — Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski

Stanczyk does intensive research. So what do you do when you find a treasure and its not related to your search? I guess I record it (for another time) and blog about it!

So here is another in my ongoing meme, “Things I Find…”. Perhaps you already know that this jester is a bibliophile. As a genealogist, I collect stories and their authors and retell the stories in my way.

So yesterday I was combing through historical newspapers, regarding the blacksheep, Stanley Gawlikowski (aka Gawlick, alias Gawley), who met his demise most unfortunately. That is why, I was reading the Toledo Blade newspapers from August 1924. So its funny or serendipitous when others share genealogical events contemporaneously with the denizens of my family tree.

As you may have surmised, I found an article on the death of Joseph Conrad (reported as from Asthma) on 3-August-1924. And, you would be correct. I found the obituary story, plus another story about the Polish boy AND a third story about Henryk Sienkiewicz whose remains were being exhumed from Vevey, Switzerland to be re-buried in Poland. I guess technically you should record two burial events for Henryk. He now lies entombed in Warsaw’s St. John’s Cathedral (Katedra sw. Jana).

So Stanczyk did not find anything about Stanley, but found August 1924 Polish genealogical events about famous Polish authors: Joseph Conrad & Henryk Sienkiewicz.

May 11, 2019

Stanley Gawlick / Gawlik

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanley Gawlick (Gawlik)

Stanczyk almost always feels elated when you can find an image for one of your ancestors. It enhances the tree to see the person’s face. Lacking that I like to put a valuable document as the image for the person.

However, finding the only picture of someone in your tree from a newspaper article, above the fold, seems to be a bittersweet blessing to this jester. You see Stanley Gawlick is shown in the Detroit Free Press from 1927 with a few of his business associates. The bitterness is that and his associates are connected with a story on thugs/criminality (ok, bank robbery / rabuś bankowy).

So dear readers, do you have any blacksheep in your tree?

May 10, 2019

Castroregio — 1827 Marriage #Genealogy #Albanian #Italian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline: June 12th, 1827 Castroregio

Basile di Lazaro & Giovanna Donnangelo — their marriage record.

#Albano_Italians

#Skanderbeg

Stanczyk’s wife, Tereza Eliasz-Solomon, has Italo-Albano blood of Skanderbeg flowing through her veins! So it was a thrill when another Facebook genealogist passed along this marriage record for my wife’s 3x great-grandparents.

May 10, 2019

Duke & Duchess of Sussex Have A Boy❣️

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Baby, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, was born 6th-May-2019 at 5:26 (BST). He is now 7th in line to the throne.

HRH Queen Elizabeth has now been blessed with eight great-grandchildren!

🇬🇧

P.S. Uniting USA & UK ??? Where’s the USA?

May 8, 2019

Ancestry App v10.32 — #Genealogy #Software

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry updated their mobile app. The main feature is now you can view parts of your family tree on a map. So they added a 3rd “tab” at the top. It is after the  “Vertical”, “Horizontal” tree orientation, you now have a “Map” orientation of viewing your tree.

If you have NOT been thorough in your place name hierarchy, you may find a few interesting placements of events. It was easy to click on the event and correct the place name hierarchy. So it is a good thing to catch where your genealogy has been a bit sloppy. If your place name is missing or very non-standard (using an old country, ex. Jugoslavia, Czechoslovakia), then your ancestor will not appear on the map.

May 1, 2019

May 3rd 2019 — Constitution Day — #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Warsaw Gazette
May 3rd Constitution (see middle of Warsaw Gazette) / Konstytucja 3 Maja

The Constitution of May 3, 1791 (Konstytucja Trzeciego Maja) was drafted between October 6, 1788, and May 3, 1791, when it was adopted by the Great Sejm of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth . The constitution’s adoption was preceded by a period of agitation with the Convocation Sejm of 1764 and the election of Stanisław August Poniatowski as the Commonwealth’s last elective monarch.

The constitution had sought to prevail over and eliminate the anarchy, caused by the Liberum Veto, which had put the Country/King at the mercy of any single Sejm deputy who chose, or was bribed by an internal interest or external foreign power, to undo all the legislation that had been passed by the Sejm. The constitution’s adoption met with immediate hostilities, both political and military by the Commonwealth’s neighbors. In the War in Defense of the Constitution, the Commonwealth’s ally Prussia, broke its alliance with the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, which was effectively defeated by the three Empires: Russia, Prussia, & Austria-Hungary (aka Hapsburg).

[NOTE: the parallels between this Sejm’s use of liberum veto and the U.S. Congresses of 2008-present who have abused/utilized omnipresent obstructionist tools: filibuster and cloture to keep the Obama administration for achieving its goals.]
British historian, Norman Davies describes the legal document as “the first constitution of its type in Europe”; Other historians documented it as the world’s second oldest codified national constitution after the U.S. Constitution, which was effective on March 4, 1789 — just two years earlier.
The Commonwealth’s 1791 Constitution remained in effect for all of 14 months and 3 weeks. It would be a long time until the Second Republic would re-emerge after World War I and Poland would re-appear and be a free republic again.
[Source Material from Wikipedia]

Tomorrow is May 3rd and in Poland and Lithuania it is celebrated as Constitution Day (first celebrated jointly on May 3rd 2007). But Stanczyk is getting ahead of himself in this story.
This jester trusts by now that you know that Poland was country with the second constitution. I am also hopeful that you had read a prior blog article of mine: “Poland 1794, The Tempest, and Catherine The Great” . For the discussion on Poland’s Constitution, I’d like to try my hand at an even broader context.

1732

Stanczyk maintains that 1732 was a very bad year for Poland. On 17 January 1732 Stanislaw Poniatowski was born in Wolczyn (which is in modern day Belarus). If the year had begun badly, then it would get much worse. On 13 September 1732, the secret treaty was signed at the Alliance of the Three Black Eagles. This was a secret treaty between Prussia, Russia and Hapsburg-Austria Empires (all three had Black Eagles as emblems — in stark contrast to Poland’s White Eagle). They agreed to maintain Poland in their “status quo” suffering from a non-functional szlachta with a Liberum Veto — meaning a single veto could derail any new law, further meaning that laws almost never got passed [sounds like 2009-2012 Washington D.C. does it not?]
Now let me narrate the rest of the story, before I give Constitution Day’s Timeline.

In 1750 Poniatowski met his mentor, the Briton, Charles Hanbury Williams . Williams was the British ambassador to Russia. They met again in 1753. Now while the Poniatowskich were a noble family, their family fortunes were not so great as the great magnate families. So they had to align themselves and hope for a strategic marriage for Stanislaw to a wealthier family. None the less, Stanislaw’s father was able to procure him some nominal titles. In 1755, the elder Poniatowski got his son Stanislaw, the title of Stolnik of Lithuania. Stolnik was a court office in Poland and Russia, responsible for serving the royal table. Keep that image in mind.

So armed with his new title of Stolnik of Lithuania, Stanislaw accompanied the British Ambassador to Russia, where the young Poniatowski met the also young (but very formidable) Catherine who had not yet become Empress of Russia (nor yet earned, her appellation, “The Great”). Stanislaw Poniatowski was only at the Russian court for one year. By 1756 Poniatowski was ordered to leave the Russian Court amidst some “intrigue”. It is thought that this intrigue resulted in the birth of Anna Petrovna (by Catherine the Great) on the 9th December 1757. It is also said that Stanislaw always hoped his bedding of Catherine would result in a future marriage for him. This jester thinks that Stanislaw deluded himself to think he had successfully wooed Catherine and that marriage was possible for the two of them. This jester also further thinks that Catherine, used this virtual “apron string” to manage Poniatowski to do her Russian bidding in Poland.

In 1762 Catherine used her new position as the Russian Empress and she was able to get Stanislaw to be elected King of Poland on 6 September 1764. It has now been 32 years of managing Poland’s status quo by the Three Black Eagles. So by 17 February 1772 the Three Black Eagles agreed to partition Poland. On August 5th, 1772 the occupation manifesto was issued and foreign troops entered Poland’s sovereign territory and forced a cession Sejm to convene with King Poniatowski and agree to the partition manifesto (probably Stanislaw thought it was best to go along with Russia in this matter and that this obedience would be rewarded) on 9/18/1773. Not much leadership in this jester’s mind was exhibited, but opposition to three Empires was probably futile anyway.

Life goes on for another decade. Stanislaw uses what little wealth of the Kingdom to foster arts & science, but with Prussia’s control of the Baltic Ports, and using its control to extort high custom duties from Poland on 80% of Poland’s economic trades to further collapse Poland’s economy and that limits Poniatowski’s wealth/power. Poniatowski also continues his hope for a noble marriage, but he does engage in a morganatic marriage to Elzbieta Szydlowska in 1783 and thereby maintains his options for a royal marriage.

In 1788 the Four Year Sejm convenes and Stanislaw thinks he can help Catherine The Great in her war with the Ottoman Empire by raising an army in Poland — which Catherine quickly squashes, but leaves the Polish Sejm alone while she wars with the Ottomans. Left to their own devices, this “Enlightened” body of lawmakers passes a constitution on 3rd May 1791. Even King Poniatowski celebrates this event. If you have read my prior blog article listed above, then you know this will NOT end well for Poland (or Poniatowski who is forced to abdicate the Polish throne 11/25/1795).

I think you can see that Poniatowski, Stolnik of Lithuania, served up Poland as a feast for Catherine The Great to enjoy repeatedly until even she was forced to make him abdicate and spend the remainder of his three years of life as a nominal prisoner in St Petersburg, Russia (so he could not meddle further in Russian affairs). Poniatowski died 2/12/1798 in St Petersburg, Russia. Poniatowski’s remains were removed and re-buried in Wolczyn, Belarus — until that church fell into disrepair. Poland reclaimed Poniatowki’s remains and he was buried a third time (14 February 1995) in St. John’s Cathedral in Warsaw, Poland — the very site where he had celebrated the Polish Constitution on May 3rd 1791.

Timeline of the Constitution:

May 3rd, 1791 – Constitution is Passed (2nd in the world).
May 1792 Constitution Day is celebrated.
July 1792 King Poniatowski joins the Targowice Confederation against Poland and his own nephew (and Kosciuszko too) who were fighting the War To Defend The Constitution with Russia and Catherine the Great who was now freed up from warring with the Ottomans and now able to show her displeasure.
1793-1806 – Constitution Day is banned during the the 2nd/3rd Partition years.
1807-1815 – Constitution Day is celebrated in the Duchy of Warsaw thanks to Napoleon.
1815-1918 – Constitution Day is unofficially celebrated / discouraged in Congress Poland
April 1919 – The re-emerged Polish Republic celebrates Constitution Day again until 1940.
World War II – Constitution Day is banned again.
1945 – Constitution Day is celebrated.
1946 – The Communists cancel Constitution Day. They substitute May Day (May 1st) as an attempt to replace the Constitution Day celebration.
April 1990 – Poland out from under the Communist yoke celebrates Constitution Day again.
May 3rd 2007 – Poland & Lithuania celebrate Constitution Day jointly echoing their former Commonwealth days. This is the first jointly celebrated Constitution Day.
Perhaps one day, the USA will celebrate with Poland on May 3rd as the two countries with the oldest constitutions. [Now, please I know Polonia all over the USA, but most notably in Chicago mark May 3rd annually.] Indeed you are reading this blog about May 3rd. So Polonia still mark the day, the old country adopted the second oldest constitution.

Happy Constitution Day!

 

May 3rd is also Feast Day of Mary Queen of Poland!

But that is another story.

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