Archive for ‘genealogia’

March 17, 2018

Genealogy in Poland Between The Wars – Conscripts (Poborowi) – #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Kielecki Dziennik Wojewodzki – 1933 July 25th


Well earlier (a few blogs ago, 20-February-2018)), Stanczyk, dropped his favorite meme, “Things I Found…“.  In actuality, this jester was searching for military conscript lists. I had one and needed help interpreting the data. That bit of seeking help resulted in my finding a news account of my great-great-grandfather Marcin Elijasz in an historical Polish newspaper from 1879.

I found two conscript lists (poborowi) in digitized historical newspapers from the 1930’s (Poland between the Wars era). I am struggling with what to do as the amount of data is in 2,000-4,500 names from both articles. After analyzing the data, what I found was:

read more »

February 25, 2018

The Other Things Found — #Historical #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

While Stanczyk was searching newspapers for military conscripts, he found many items useful to genealogy…

Today was a landholders chart for Niegosławice village, in Pacanów gmina, Stopnica powiat of 22-June-1933.

Found in Newspaper: Kielecki Dziennik Wojewódzki

Stanczyk would like to call your attention to one of his ancestors, on line 12 (Leon Wleciał).

This chart had four columns:

Line Number, Landholder(s), Plot Number, Plot area in ha (hectares).

So on Line #12 (col. 1), we see Leon Wleciał (col. 2), Plot #18 (col. 3), 6.1019ha (col. 4).

This Leon was not the Leon who came to America, but the Leon who was a witness/god-father in church records for the Wleciałowscy who came to America (and some who stayed in Poland too).

You want to search for:

Okręgowego Urzęd Ziemskiego

(Official District Land in <gubernia-name>).

September 20, 2017

Meme: #Wordless #Wednesday — Polish Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The above image is from an Alegata in support of an 1878 marriage where the bride was from out parish (Biechów parish / parafia, Kielce Gubernia, Russian-Poland; the bride was originally born in Dębica parish, Austrian Empire, Galicia Kingdom, Pilzno District, Tarnów diocese.

Baby: Marianna Czajka daughter of Joseph Czajka & Catharina Golec

Joseph Czajka son of Apolonia Czajka (Illeg. )

Catharina Golec dau. of Sebastian Golec & Sophia Bielacik

Born: 28-February-1854

Extracted: 5-January-1878 for alegata in support of 1878 Biechów Marriage Akt. 1

May 13, 2017

Genealogical Persistence in Pacanów = Serendipity in Zborówek — #Genealogy #Polish #Alegata

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1885 Zborowek Births, Akt 27

Stanczyk believes in persistence and serendipity when it comes to genealogical research. This jester believes a genealogical researcher makes his/her serendipity through that persistence, the bull-dogged determinism and hard work that yields the sweet fruit. 

Oh and after a few years of experience THEN you may trust your instincts. First learn. Learn genealogical research. Learn your family including friends and geography; understand that social network then you play your hunches and trust your instincts in the face of scant or missing data. 

As usual, I have a personal story to demonstrate what I mean. This small story is part of a larger story which is part of an even larger story. But I will start with small story and roll-up fractal-like into the larger fractal pictures (uh stories).
I was trying to find Stanislaw Krzyzycki (Stanisław Krzyżycki po polskiu), specifically his birth record in Poland in the area of my paternal grandparents (cluster genealogy / social-network-analysis). That was my goal. I had many US documents and knew a lot about Stanley and his brother Walter/Wladyslaw and their life in Niagara Falls / Buffalo NY. I also saw a soft connection to my grandparents and to a Stanley Eliasz that for years I suspected was a cousin of my grandfather Joseph Eliasz. But Stanley Eliasz and Stanley Krzyzycki remained opaque to me. I tucked them into a virtual shoe-box that I would return to. This is a part of the next larger story/goal.

On the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, in the old country, “Poland” I had a parallel situation. I had an Antoni Elijasz who was married to Katarzyna Krzyzycka. With the launch of Genbaza ( I had new avenues of research to connect America to Poland. I had a couple of Elusive Stanley Eliasz/Elyasz to resolve. 

Stanley Elyasz came to Detroit from Pacanów the same as my grandfather but there was no family memory of Stanley Elyasz. Stanley Eliasz in Buffalo was even more opaque. Eventually genbaza solved both puzzles. I knew Stanley Elyasz (Detroit) was the son of Marcin Elijasz & his 2nd of three wives, Agnieszka Skwara. I also knew that Marcin Elijasz and my great-grandfather Jozef Elijasz were brothers (two sons of Marcin Elijasz & Anna Zasucha my 2x-greatgrandparents). So I finally had Genealogical proof, not just a hunch that Stanley Elyasz was my grandfather’s first-cousin. 

I also connected Stanley Eliasz to his parents, Antoni Elijasz/Katarzyna Krzyzycki and his sister, Helena through genbaza birth records. Antoni Elijasz was still opaque and as yet not drawn as a son of Marcin Elijasz/Anna Zasucha (though that is a long held hunch). So Stanley Eliasz (Buffalo) I could not yet confirm as another first-cousin to my grandfather. But I now know his parents. 

Walerya & Jozef Eliasz from 1913

Anyway, this small story is about Stanley Krzyzycki. For a long time I suspected my grandparent’s picture from 1913 was taken by a Krzyzycki in Buffalo/Niagara area. So any way the documents in the US led me to believe these NY Krzyzycki (Krzyzyckich ?) were related to Antoni’s wife, Katarzyna Krzyzycki. With the websites: Geneszukacz & Genbaza I was able to locate Krzyzycki in Pacanow & Szczebrzusz (try and get those American teeth & tongues around those Polish phonemes!!).

I found Ludwik Krzyzycki & Franciszka Sikora. Easily enough I found Stanley Krzyzycki’s brother, Walter/Wladyslaw and his birth record. I also found Aleksander Jan Krzyzycki too. But no Stanislaw. I did see a few possible female Krzyzyckich who could also be siblings too. But I focused on a marriage record for a Joanna Krzyzycka because I knew if she was a sister then she would be older and would be a bookend child (along with Wladyslaw) and I would expect Stanislaw to be born between these two children. So I persisted. I read Joanna’s marriage record and yes she was a sister of Stanley Krzyzycki. She also married a man whose family name I did not recognize. So I looked at Joanna’s husband and indeed he was born outside the parish (Pacanów). Now from long experience I knew there would be an alegata or two about Joanna & her husband (Antoni Bąk). I found that Joanna’s age indicated an 1880 birth. Ergo, she was older. I had my bookend child. What I did not expect to find was an Alegata of Joanna’s birth. Great I had her exact birthdate. But wait that meant Joanna was born elsewhere too, another parish besides Pacanow. Joanna was born in Zborówek! Zborówek is an adjoining parish to Pacanów. 

Ok now its getting interesting. First, I confirm Joanna’s birth by finding her actual birth record (Akt42) in 1880 Zborówek. Good. Now I walk forward, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, …,bingo! In 1885, (April 12th 1885), I found Stanisław Krzyżycki and this date matches some of his US records too! Wow that is persistence! Oh and the serendipity of such persistence? It turns out that Stanisław Krzyzycki’s Godfather is Antoni Elijasz. 

Wow, Stanley Eliasz & Stanley Krzyzycki are 1st cousins (not proven but a 75% likelihood by my estimate). So Katarzyna Krzyzycki & Ludwik Krzyzycki are siblings. Now I had proven a hard connection between Eliasz & Krzyzycki who came to America. 

I also have Eliasz & Krzyzycki in:
Pacanów, Zborówek and Szczebrzusz.
This can lead to many new facts (with research):

  1. Krzyzycki photographer took 1913 Eliasz photo in NY.

  2. Antoni Elijasz is a brother of my 2nd greatgrandfather, Jozef Elijasz.

  3. Stanley Eliasz (son of Antoni) is a cousin of Julian Elijasz (son of Ludwik Elijasz). I already know that their two wives are sisters from Pacanów. These two Janicki sisters are a sister and a cousin of my two Dorota Elijasz 2nd-cousins’ grandmothers!

So oddly enough I have connected Stanley Eliasz (Buffalo) to my family tree via the JANICKI affiliated family.  

I have since found more Eliasz Godparents to Krzyzycki children. Thus the Eliasz-Krzyzycki connection was further strengthened.

But that is a part of the bigger next story and my connection to Nancy Langer. Well of course, today’s story is also part of Nancy’s story and it in fact grew out of her story and my long-term virtual shoe-box. It just turned out that both Julian & Stanley Eliasz were a part of Nancy’s family and I am her affiliated family! Or are we actually related? Her trip to Poland this summer may answer that question.

That is Stanczyk’s short (longish) story on persistence & serendipity. Go make some serendipity yourself. 

April 29, 2017

Dziennik Polski (Detroit) — #Newspapers #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been very busy! A long overdue update to my Rootsweb page on Dziennik Polski has been done … more to come!

Also this jester has added 6,000 names to the Complete Index (nearly 42,000 Poles) including adding names (& relationships to deceased) listed on the Funeral Cards. The One-Step db app based on this data needs to be re-done. 

December 12, 2016

Searchin’ For Zasucha — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has the instincts of an hard-boiled detective.  Now this is not the story of forensic genealogy. Nor am I infringing on Tim Firkowski (Genealogy Assistant / Family History Detective). I guess my hard-boiled detective work stems from my reading Michael Chabon right now. 

No I am investigating / researching an affiliated family of my ELIASZ /ELIJASZ ancestors: the ZASUCHA. You see, Anna Zasucha, is my 2nd-great-grandmother and wife of Marcin/Martin Eliasz. She is a part of my direct DNA. Like in DNA, the ZASUCHA are a genetic marker for my Eliasz family of village Pacanów. Hence, my curiosity.

Now for a while this jester has noticed the Zasucha were engaged in some  chain-migration genealogy involving many families from Pacanów to the USA, including among others, my Eliasz family.

So I find Zasucha in many of the same locales as my Eliasz: 

Buffalo, Syracuse, Niagara Falls, Cleveland, Toledo and Detroit.

But there was NO family memory of ZASUCHA among my direct Eliasz family. Indeed, nobody knew Anna Zasucha was our 2nd-great-grandmother.

But I notice things and patterns and I have employed SNA (Social Network Analysis), aka as cluster genealogy before and made breakthroughs in finding out more about my direct lineage by studying these genetic markers (affiliated families) as they immigrated to the USA in a chain-migration fashion. Whole branches have been discovered. I would welcome geneslogists with:

Kędzierski/Kendzierski, Pieszczachowicz, Fras/Frass, Hajek, Zwolski, and Zasucha (all affiliated to Eliasz/Pacanów or Leszczyński/Biechów).
You will be happy I have connected back your families to those two ancestral parishes(Biechów and Pacanów) whence my paternal grandparents originated from. Indeed, I have found many 2nd/3rd and further distant cousin-genealogists via this blog’s research. However, I am still waiting on a Zasucha genealogist.

So this blog is about a lovely couple: Feliks Zasucha & Antonina Łuszcz Zasucha (both from Pacanów).
I want to end this blog with the Zasucha in my tree and pick up in the next blog article with my struggles to find data on Feliks & Antonina.

Eliasz Zasucha family tree

2nd and 3rd great-grandparents

November 16, 2016

NJ – Passaic County Naturalization Papers — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wanted to pass along a tip from Ceil Wendt-Jensen! Its a good one too:

Go to the following website:

There are Declarations of Intent (shown above) and Petitions for Naturalization forms.

The images can be downloaded as PDF documents. This service is FREE!

May 12, 2016

Ancestry App is Updated to v. 7.2

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry 7.2  (App Store )

download iPhone v 7.2

As the picture shows version 7.2 is 87.5 MB and newly minted.

You can download the iPhone version by clicking on the above image.

Beyond the new features, the app’s UI is more attractive in both tree and individual presentations.

April 7, 2016

Rootsweb Is Back Up … — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Rootsweb Stanczyk attended Ceil Jensen’s PARI webinar yesterday. Ceil graciously mentioned my Rootsweb page on Dziennik Polski (Detroit), a Polish historical newspaper.

I was excited for the shout-out and since I had not been on Rootsweb since it came back up, I decided a visit was in order.

Much to my horror the pages were recovered to 2013. Any work since was lost. I was able to quickly restore the current pages from my local files on my laptop. I uploaded the changed files and everything was fine. 

But I now wondered how much on Rootsweb private/user pages were not completely restored to their latest version?

Please check your pages on Rootsweb in case you may need to recover your work/research!

Tags: ,
March 4, 2016

FTM Is Back!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

FTM — Mac & Windows It’s here! Family Tree Maker is BACK.And its available RIGHT NOW!

FTM updates

They started with Ancestry’s FTM 2014 and FTM Mac 3 and set the focus on stability and performance improvements. Some bugs were also eliminated. The application is more responsive – you will find some actions that previously took minutes now take seconds.
New features

We managed to sneak in just a few surprises, like 100 beautiful new backgrounds you can use to make professional looking charts and reports. And we’ve integrated a service for printing high resolution genealogy charts through the good folks at Family ChartMasters. It’s a modest start, but we hope you will be happy with our new updates.

Mac Kiev sure that the new updates are completely compatible with the latest operating systems (Windows 10 and Mac, El Capitan). They made sure that your old trees will open seamlessly. There is nothing to move.

That your Ancestry account if you have one will continue to work with the new versions. And that TreeSync and all the other things you have come to like about FTM are still there for you.

Get The Update

What you will get and when depends on what FTM version you currently have:
1. Users of FTM 2014 and Mac 3: FREE updates are coming. They will be available in about a week or so through the software’s built-in update feature. Registered users will receive an email to let them know as soon available.
2. Users of older FTM editions: No matter how old your copy of FTM is, or whether its running on Windows or Mac, you can download an upgrade for $29.95 .
3. New users: If you have never owned a copy of Family Tree Maker before, for a limited time, you can download a full edition from their online store for $49.95 .
Family Tree Maker users who do not currently have an subscription, will be offered a 14-day free trial.

If you would like a backup disc, you can purchase a CD in a jewel case for an extra $10 including shipping and handling.

Most everything you will need to know can be found on the Family Tree Maker home page:

February 8, 2016

Pacanów 1908 Marriages (Małżeństwo) — #Genealogy #Polish #Data

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Pacanow Marriage Metric Statistics

Pacanow Marriage Metric Statistics


Stanczyk has been reading the 1908 Marriages of Pacanow in order to build a spreadsheet/index of the newlyweds. There are some findings from this very preliminary set of data (1st year of data). First the men are noticeably older than the women. Men are often widowers ( and very much more so than the women). The men also frequently come from another parish. Now I collected that statistic for two reasons: (1) There will be an alegata record to document this cross-parish marriage   (2) So you can find the groom’s birth record (since it will not be in Pacanow).  I was surprised at how often the bride had come from another parish too. This data also confirms that the marriage is performed in the bride’s parish and its place is listed as the bride’s (current) village. I did find that one mother was an ELIJASZ so once again, this is an affirmation that social network analysis (SNA) can yield helpful results. In fact, I am hoping to use do a full scale SNA on Pacanow some day (1875-1908).

The spreadsheet is available to the public (and if wants it for its indexes of Geneteka/Geneszukacz then you have my permission/blessing). The spreadsheet is HERE (PDF) .


P.S. – One of the things I have learned is that the online indexes I have seen are incomplete (not missing). What I mean is that I have recently found data that was not present in an index that existed and I was puzzled by the omission.



February 7, 2016

Pacanow — Indexes & Metric Stats #Genealogy #Polish #Kielce

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is  stuck on Pacanow. So I thought I would collect the metric statistics for all events (Births/Marriages/Deaths — Ur./Mal./Zg.) and  individuals from the marriages.

— sample data collected:


On marriages, I wanted to figure out how many times a person was from outside the parish. On all events, I wanted to know how many of each per year and the totals, plus the net growth (Births-Deaths) of Pacanow population (catholic).

I also hope that someone from Poland a genealogist or a resident of Pacanow or an archivist can answer one question: Is there any existing metric data for Pacanow before 1875? It would also be nice to know why, if there is no data or where if there is data.

A neighboring parish, Biechow (my grandmother’s parish),  has the same data available online from the National Archive (AP), but has data from late 17th century (w.) up to about 1850 (from Diocesan Archive – AD). Again why is there a gap between 1850 and 1875 in Biechow in the AD/AP data? Why is there no record of Pacanow data in the Diocesan Archive (AD)?

Pomocy z Polski ?


February 2, 2016

Family Tree Maker (FTM) — Please update the death date!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Ok the death date for FTM software needs to be updated from 31-DECEMBER-2015 to <null>. It appears that FTM’s death was greatly exagerated!

It appears Ancestry has two solutions …

  1. RootsMagic – TreeSynch, Hints, Ancestry Search, Direct Import for people converting from FTM (no intermediate gedcom necessary).
  2. MacKiev – Will takeover development & publishing of FTM. For over six years MacKiev had done the development for FTM. 

More details are at’s blog .

January 24, 2016

Adamczak from Trzebieslawice — #Polish #Genealogy #Łoniow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Birth #22 from 1908 Łoniow Births – Maryanna Adamczak daughter of Walenty Adamczak & Elzieta Kamuda God Parents: Wicenty Adamczak & Rozalia Adamczak all from Trzebieslawice in Parish Łoniow

January 21, 2016

Mailbag — Wleciał from Pacanów

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Stanczyk received an email from the old country … Poland. It was from a distant cousin who only spoke/wrote in Polish. Aleksandra, wrote in enough detail that I could place her family in my family tree. She was most appreciative of my research and thankful that she could ask someone about her Wleciał family in America. She was very kind and shared some photos  …  (see below).

What made this a special email for me was that Aleksandra had been born in Pacanów, my paternal grandfather’s home village. Sadly, she no longer lived there. Besides the connection to Pacanów, she shared her family photos from the cemetery in Pacanów (which I assume is the church graveyard). This jester has long wanted to return to the ancestral village and see the parish and its graveyard and with some hope, the parish books. But something about seeing the church graveyard in my grandfather’s birthplace touched me very deeply and deepened the longing to see with my own eyes, Pacanów.

I emailed back to Aleksandra and I hope to get some more emails back. I sent her what she was looking for in terms of her Wleciał family in America. What I am hoping for from Aleksandra is to see if she has any photos of her grandparents, one of which is Katarzyna Elijasz (daughter of Marcin Elijasz & Anna Zasucha). Katarzyna Elijasz is my great-great-aunt, born about 1866 in  Pacanów. She married Maciej Wleciał on 19-October-1890 in Pacanów. This was according to Akt#38, of Pacanów 1890 Marriages. Katarzyna was 24 at the time of her marriage, implying a birth about 1866.

At any rate, here are the photos from “Pacanów cemetery” that Aleksandra sent. This jester does not know all of the people, but the image of Jozef  Wleciał  ‘s (Katarzyna’s son) grave was beautiful.

Jozef Wlecial

January 14, 2016

Another Kielce Gubernia Genealogist Reunited With Her Ancestral Parish — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk — Reunited another genealogist with her grandfather’s parish (Olesnica) and his birth record #95 in Olesnica 1889 Births.


Jan Lalewicz – born 3rd-July-1889 in Olesnica to Franciszek Lalewicz and Maryanna Ziembinska.

January 4, 2016

Kielce Holdings Possible in GenBaza … — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielcach Archive Holdings

              partial pdf table of Kielce church/synagouge books

Stanczyk, was looking at the GenBaza news of what was being indexed and loaded in order to see what was coming online (… eventually). This jester noticed a PDF document of the inventory of books at Diocessan Archives (AD), State Archive (AP) and in some of the parishes too.

Now let me hasten to add that this is NOT an inventory of online records/images. It is only a list of what may yet come and of course some of these are already online, but many more are just potential data available to be indexed and loaded.

The actual PDF document is here . A final note the Fond# is similar to what the Library of Congress calls a Record Group. It is the identifier for requesting the resource inside the archive. Only State Archives have a Fond#, not the church archive nor the church parish.


 Fond #  Place Name Date Range Books Count Count of Images     NOTES
Bebelno 1787-1864  13 1,174  AD
Bejsce 1586-1862  37 3,966  AD
Biechów 1674-1855  50 3,598  AD
355 Pacanów 1875-1908 64 3,703  AP
373 Pacanów moj 1875-1912  55 1,957  AP (jewish)
399 Pałecznica 1861-1911  77 3,235  AP
December 17, 2015

Anna Sławińska – Piotr Glica birth record images

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Anna Sławińska (Bukowa, Wiązownica parish, Kielce Gubernia, Poland)

18910912 Birth 105 Wiazownica parish Anna Slawinski

Akt 105 in Wiazownica parish Record Date: 13-September-1891 Dad: Jan Slawinski, age 30, of village Bukowa Witnesses: Jozef Wrona, age 50 & Wincenty Stempa age 40 BirthDate: 12-September-1891 Birthplace: Bukowa Mom: Maryanna Kubik. age 32 Baby: ANNA God Parents: Jozef Mlodzinski & Maryanna Staworz

Piotr Glica (Trzcianka, Niekrasów parish, Kielce Gubernia, Poland)


Akt 49 in Niekrasow parish Record Date: 19-May-1891 Dad: Jan Glica, age 45, (occupation? Owner/Master), of village Trzcianka Witnesses: Leon Nowak, age 20 & Wojciech Was, age 46 BirthDate: 19-May-1891 (“this day”) BirthPlace: Trzcianka Mom: Maryanna Bartosik, age 33 Baby: Piotr God Parents: Kazimierz Krali (/ Kralia) & Katarzyna Glod in the margin (see purple stamp/ink): Parish Niekrasow on: 6-November-1912, Akt #9 in New York 29-January-1912 Newlyweds: Piotr Glica & Anna Stawinska [sic -> Anna Slawinska]


December 12, 2015

Anna Slavinska, from Sulislawice

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk got another genealogical question. It was from Cris (on

Cris wrote …




Cris, welcome to my blog. I have good news so please keep reading. As you no doubt know, I have SLAWINSKI in my own family tree. Most likely you will find your name in Polish Archive / Church records written as SŁAWIŃSKI in Polish and as СЛАВИНСКИЙЬ in Russian records.

From I have a map of your ancestral village (Sulislawice, 50,587500   21,468333  – see pink circle).

population 353 people (osoby)
woj.        świętokrzyskie
pow.       Sandomierski
gmina   Łoniów



Since your ancestral village is near to Sandomierz, I knew it would be in Kielce AP (state archive of Poland) and in particular its office in Sandomierz AP.  This Kielce / Sandomierz area is where the overwhelming majority of my Polish ancestors come from. As a result, I knew to check to see if your grandmother Anna Slawinska might have her records online. The good news is yes, those records are online in GenBaza. It has Sulislawice (which is also the parish) in the years:  1810-1910 [inclusive].

You will need to be able to read Polish for records 1810-1868 (possibly Latin before 1820). For records in the years 1869-1910, they will be written in Russian/Cyrillic characters.

You will also need to register for userid / password on (which takes you to and do so in Polish to gain access to that database of church record images.  This is doable, but not a trivial task. Once you get an email with your userid/password, contact me again and I will post the link to my blog where I wrote a user guide to using the website.

But it is the holiday season and your Slawinski may be relatives of my Slawinski. So this jester is willing to find your grandmother’s birth record (if she was in fact born in Sulislawice). To do so, please  contact me in Ancestry again with:

  1. Your grandmother’s birth date (the year must be in the range 1810 … 1910)
  2. Your grandmother’s parents names (great-grandparents).

I will use that info to search for and send you the birth record if I find it. I will also provide a translation of the key genealogical facts (dates, names, ages, etc.) from what I am expecting will be a Russian language record.


Happy Holidays !


1886 – Akt (Record) #47 – Stefan Slawinski son of Stanislaw Slawinski & Marianna Jarok in Gieraszowice


November 11, 2015

Dobrowoda & Fras/Frass Genealogy — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dobrowoda Dobrowoda, “Good Water” indeed. Its about 15-16 km from my paternal grandmother (babcia/Busia), Waleria’s ancestral village (Biechow). Waleria Leszczynska’s (half-)sister, Agnieszka married her 2nd husband, Wladyslaw Fras … somewhere (I am still looking for that marriage). Agnieszka & Waleria (the Leszczynscy) were born in Biechow so you might expect their marriage was there in the bride’s village as is custom.  But let me start this genealogical story from the beginning.

A few years ago, my family tree on the Internet caused someone to email me about my Leszczynski. For years, other genealogists had emailed about LESZCZYNSKI, so I was used to saying, “Its a popular name and we are not related or are so distantly related that we cannot prove it.” But this person had a name, Agnieszka Leszczynski, which I had one too in my tree, but she was born so long ago (1866) that I only had a birth record and nothing more for Agnieszka Leszczynski. But she had a Russian Passport (which she could not read). I had never seen an actual Russian Passport before, so I told her I would look at it and help translate what info I could and perhaps that will tell us whether there is a chance that her ancestor (great-grandfather), Jozef Fras, was son of my Agnieszka Leszczynski or not. Long Story-Short, the passport gave clues to the same area, tantalizingly close to Biechow — so I could neither prove nor disprove the relationship, but it was an avenue for research. So I started researching her Fras/Frass from Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. They were close to where my grandparents and my grand-aunt, Antonina Leszczynska Sobieszczanski lived. Ok that added a very tenuous connection.  I found a church baptism where Jozef Fras’s wife, BENIGNA (not a common name) was a God Mother to one of my dad’s Sobieszczanski cousins. Ok. that is a pretty good connection. Next I found Jozef’s ship manifest and that his father was Wladyslaw Fras living in Piersciec, a village in the same parish as my grandmother’s family. Ok that is a great connection. Oh, look Jozef went from his father, Wladyslaw, to his uncle Teofil Leszczynski (my grand-uncle) in Depew, Erie County, NY. Ok that is a solid family indicator. So I emailed Mindy to tell her that we were probably related and I added Fras to my family tree.

So Mindy sent me family photos of other Fras family from Poland. So I knew Jozef had two brothers and a sister (maybe) and I had their names. From the passport I had a birthdate / birthplace for Jozef (Zborow – which I initially mistook for Zborowek, but later realized he meant the Zborow near Solec, at any rate both were in Kielce gubernia. So I had Biechow and Solec as possible parishes to research. Eventually GenBaza published images online and I could progress, I did find Jozef’s siblings: Teofil & Wincenty(and two sisters born in Piestrzec/Piersciec). But I could not find Jozef and I also could not locate Wladyslaw and Agnieszka’s marriage record in Biechow or Solec (nor in Stopnica). I began to research in nearby parishes (cluster genealogy) looking for either the birth or the marriage record. Years went by and no luck.

Did I mention that GenBaza went offline due to technical problems? It did and when it came back I noticed a few new parishes, hence Dobrowoda (which was >= 15km away) and I doubted that a parish at such a distance might yield any new clues. However, earlier I had found a church record in Stopnica of a Fras birth, where a Wladyslaw Fras was God Father. I then found the marriage and alegata for the couple whom Wladyslaw was God Father for. It turned out that Fras was originally from Silesia [Uiejsce, in Wojkowice Koscielne parish, in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia, Poland]. I found this Fras’ birth record and now had his parents (possibly Wladyslaw’s parents or maybe just uncle/aunt). Using Geneteka as an index, I found other children for Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas, besides this Stopnica Fras. This family went from Wojkowice Koscielne parish in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia to Holudza village in Chotel Czerwony parish, in Kielce Gubernia. OK now we are getting close. I found Jan Fras’ death record in Kikow village in Dobrowoda parish (also Kielce Gubernia). So when Dobrowoda came online, I decided I would look there once GenBaza came back online.

That is where this blog entry starts. There were many years and I was not expecting any Fras really. So I started in Zborowek instead which now had metrical records and not just alegata like before. Some minor advances, but nothing really. So I looked at Dobrowoda. There were many years in Dobrowoda and my eyes went right to a book that ended in ‘rejestr’. These ‘rejestr’ tend to be church censuses, sometimes just an annual census, sometimes a decade, sometimes two-three generations. So I thought I could quickly scan and see if there were any Fras or not in this parish.

It was just an annual census (my hopes were lowered) for 1895 sorted alphabetically with Birth Marriage and Death records indexed together (in a funky Polish handwriting – that I had to train my eyes to read). Ok there was a Fras, a Teofil Fras. But I had already found my Teofil Fras born in 1903, so this Teofil Fras born in 1895 must be for another family. Nonetheless, I wanted the record to see if Wladyslaw or Agnieszka Fras were a God Parent or witness. So I was shocked to find that this Teofil Fras was also a child of Wladyslaw Fras and Agnieszka Leszczynska. This Teofil must have died and thus the second Teofil was born in 1903 (who is the one in my picture with Wincenty). Ok this parish had my Fras. Maybe I can find the birth of Jozef and/or the marriage of Wladyslaw & Agnieszka here. From the passport, I knew that Jozef was born in 1893, so I went to that year. Guess what I found? Yes, I finally found Jozef Fras’  birth record and the date matched as well as the parents.

Alas, I still did not find the marriage record of Wladyslaw and Agnieszka, but now I have hope. I hope I can find their marriage and also Wladyslaw’s birth (once I confirm that his parents are indeed Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas). You must persevere. These affiliated families (like Fras) can indicate parishes to research in for your main lines and shorten your cluster genealogy search. But as you saw, Dobrowoda was indeed good water for Stanczyk.

Jozef Fras birth record:

Jozef Fras Akt #23

Jozef Fras Akt #23

September 22, 2015 Releases App Version 6.7 — #Genealogy #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Ancestry App version 6.7

– 6.7 (click to go to App Store)

Early today (22-September-2015) — The latest version of Ancestry’s app version 6.7 was released. Now 90.5MB  in size.

The download is specific to handling images. The quality and ease of dealing with images in your smartphone was greatly improved!

August 24, 2015

GenBaza Is Back ! 24-August-2015 — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenBaza Is Back 24-August-2015Dateline 24-August-2015 — GenBaza is now fully accessible again. GenPol is still not fully recovered, but at least its functionality that it provides for authenticating GenBaza allows us full access to GenBaza again!  Good Job to the tech wizards at


August 20, 2015

Historical Newspapers … #Australia — #Genealogy #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Stanczyk was reminded this week by Flipboard genealogy blogger Kenneth R Marks (Boost Your Genealogy Research With Newspapers) — If you have not discovered this valuable resource then by all means click the link and scan his recent articles in his curated Flipboard magazine.

This week Mr. Marks’ article reminded this jester about TROVE, an Australian Historical Newspaper (and other online documents too) website.  Now I say reminded, because loyal readers may recall my article from April 2013 (From Pacanow Poland to Birchgrove …).

I like what they have done since 2013 and it appears they have been busy at TROVE. So i encourage you to take another look for your Polish ancestor.  TIP (see picture): Use advanced search, look for online resources, search the newspapers for: Naturalization Notice, Poland and check the categories: Advertising, Family Notices to see vital record notices as well as immigration/naturalization notices. This should get your a little over 8,000  articles to search through.

Here are two images of  Polish expats who immigrated to Australia post World War II:



August 8, 2015

GenBaza is not reachable because is down ! #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenBaza_MainGenBaza is fine. However, there is no way to see anything other than Lodz. The reason is because has had a bad crash. GenPol is used as the login/authentication method for GenBaza so we cannot reach the other databases until GenPol is fixed (a couple of weeks at least).

Check back and I will update this post when GenBaza is back.


17-August-2015 –  A few days ago, Stanczyk noticed that had updated their 503 Page (Server Outage). This lets users know that the server is down and that recovery is in progress (both English/Polish). This was important so people do not think they are just gone.


May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:



Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:


The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.


For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.

May 10, 2015

Letter From Olivier – #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Olivier, first thanks for reading/writing the blog …

I’ve been reading your genealogy blog for a year now and I’ve found some nice infomration from and a lot of good humour as well, thank you and good job.
I trying to research my in-law’s side of the family. They come from Lomza and Grajewo region of Poland, I believe it is the Podlaskie District. The names are Bruszkiewicz and Jurkowski, and Trepanowski (a cousin).

I registered with and and metryki but it doesn’t look as easy as how you made it look in your blog stories to find available scans. And then when I go to the Polish State Archives, well the short of it is I don’t read Russian (and I don’t read Polish either but I can read indexes, I can’t in Russian) and I don’t know how to spell Bruszkiewicz in Russian. So when I am faced with an index or i’m looking at a page of 4 birth certificates, i don’t even know what I’m looking at.

Then I will need to find help with translations.

Do you have any tips on how to translate a Polish family name into how it would be spelled in Russian? And written by hand in a civil register?

As anyone indexed these parishes?

Any encouragements or tips would be welcomed if possible 🙂 The whole thing feels like a brick wall!

Thank you for any help, and good job on the blog!

Best, Olivier

Ok let me see in what ways I can help you:

  1. First I am self taught in Russian and Polish from books written by William F. Hoffman and Jon Shea. So I’d recommend purchasing & reading their books, “In Their Own Words …” .  Volumes I & II.
  2. Also it is helpful to know Polish and learn the families and village names in Polish as this will help when you learn to read Russian. Translating names back & forth between Polish & Russian is more art than science.  So knowing family names  before tackling helps. Lets try a few names: Eliasz became Elijasz under Russian (1868-1918) in Russian-Poland partition. So I was expecting to see: елиашь  or элиашь but was surprised to see it as: елияшь  or элияшь in Russian/Cyrillic. So learn the Cyrillic “alphabet”  and the sounds of those letters so you can transliterate Polish/English/Latin letters into Russian/Cyrillic. has a good English-to-Russian (and vice-versa) tool at:

So if we try, “Bruszkiewicz”, we get (try the first one, but keep in mind that you are liable to see any below):

Брушзкивич, Брюшзкивич, Бружзкивич, Брюжзкивич, Брушжкивич, Брюшжкивич, Бружжкивич, Брюжжкивич, Брушзкиевич, Брюшзкиевич, Бружзкиевич, Брюжзкиевич, Брушжкиевич, Брюшжкиевич, Бружжкиевич, Брюжжкиевич

  1. You are correct about Lomza/Grajewo current wojewowdztwo. Both appear to be indexed in Geneteka. You can try the website:
  2. Grajewo is in Szukajwarchiwach (1890-1912): . Have you read my documentation for using Szukajwarchiwach?
  3. Let’s see what “Bruszkiewicz” looks like in 1890 index in Cyrillic cursive writing: … ok I could not find Bruszkiewicz in a handful of years that I searched in both Grajewo and Lomza. Perhaps you need to verify the locale.
  4. So I went back to Geneteka and found a Bruszkiewicz in the index that I could locate online. I wanted to show you what it looks like in cursive Cyrillic:



April 7, 2015

Genealogy Collaboration — #Genealogy #Collaboration #Facebook

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is BIG on collaboration on genealogical research. So, let me start by thanking Donna Keicher (FB) genealogist, Western NY Genealogical Society member, etc. Thank you Donna!

Donna was going to Buffalo & Eric County Public Library (BECPL) and she graciously agreed to donate some of her research time at BECPL to helping others from outside the area in their Western NY research. Stanczyk loves RAOGK (receiving and giving) as a collaborative pursuit. The BECPL is on my wish list (again) this year to visit and do some research in. Any way, Donna was able to get me a complete death date for Frank/Franciszek Leszczynski and she sent me an image from the Buffalo Evening News newspaper from 25-JUNE-1943.

Stanczyk also did a RAOGK for another researcher by visiting Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery (Devon, PA). It was for a James Davis (1784-1852) and was through, Find-A-Grave. I took a shot of his tombstone. While there, I also did some shots that added to memorials that were missing pictures and added a few new memorials (18th century) that were missing from Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery on Find-A-Grave. I noticed an interesting tombstone (Phyllis Burr) who had a bit of a story about her slavery past. I learned a bit about Philadelphia’s abolitionists and the US Warship Ganges that rescued over 100 people from slavery (to indentured servitude/apprenticeship). Along the way, my social wife, spoke with the pastor John Loring (of The  Baptist Church in the Great Valley). The good pastor had some materials that he mailed, to this jester, about his historical cemetery and its occupants. Thank you Pastor John Loring.

Now this jester would like to hasten to add that he has done a lot of contributions to genealogy at Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz ‘s FB Group, Polish Genealogy. In particular, I like to help people with their translations or even  just reading the handwriting in their research finds from Poland. I also like to help genealogists in the group locate their ancestral parishes in Gazetteers or on current/historical  maps. Everyone is always sharing expertise,  tools or web sites to aid each other in furthering their genealogical research — this jester gets a kick out of brushing shoulders with the many talented/knowledgeable people the world over.

Let me conclude today’s blog by mentioning that ALL links today are to Facebook pages. The people & pages on Facebook have grown into a tremendous collaboration opportunity and also a learning tool as well.

March 15, 2015 – What’s Happening in March ? – #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Parafia Michałów


Stanczyk wanted to check-in on GenBaza and what has been going on for the old Wojewodztwo/Gubernia Kielce.

Thank You Kornelia! So here are the GenBaza updates:


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parish, [sfotografowała parafię]
Michałów (1711-1904) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym].


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Orthodox parishes, [sfotografowała parafię prawosławne]
Miechów (1892-1912) and also
Nowe Brzesko (1906-1908) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Jewish congregation in, [sfotografowała parafie]
Sobków_moj (1810, 1826-1912) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]


— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parishes, [sfotografowała parafie]
Waśniów (1890-1910) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym] and also
Wiślica Gmina (1755-1825) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

March 12, 2015

Techno#Genea™ – A New Meme For 2015 — #Genealogy #Geneteka

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Needs a new meme. Hence “Techno#Genea” .    I am putting my hashtags to work inside and not necessarily at the beginning. Software will just have to catch up.

Techno#Genea is my meme to talk about technology + genealogy – just lose the “logy”.

Today’s Techno#Genea is on G E N E T E K A .  Geneteka added a new and I think very useful feature. Between the search fields and Search (Wyszukaj) button and the rows of data (i.e. result-set) are two lines:

‘Parafie w promieniu 15km:’ (Parishes within a 15km radius) of the parish you were searching within [in my case,  Biechow] and ‘Lata: ‘ (Years). In the case of the parishes, it gave me six: Beszowa, Oleśnica, Pacanów, Stopnica, Szczebrzusz, Zborówek. These are actually clickable too. You can start by searching all places, in my case you’d find 3 pages of ELIASZ (155 results) in the result set of BIRTHS. So to limit what I am looking at, I can go back to the Ksiega field and select from the drop down menu, “Biechow (pow. buski) – (U) 1810-1820” to look at just the Births (U) for Biechow and I get a much smaller result-set of just 9 records. But look at the two new lines!  I can click on PACANOW link and the result set changes to 58 (across 2 pages) births in Pacanow. This is #AWESOME ! Now you can do proximity searches, just by clicking on links of parish names. It also helps to teach you a bit of geography nearby to your ancestral village/parish.

Now just a word to the wise. This is only for records that have been indexed. It is not ALL records available and not all parishes are shown (just those with indexed records). So in the case of Biechow, you will not see Swiniary [today] as one of the parishes within the 15km radius even though it is only about 2-3km. This is because Geneteka has not indexed any records in Swiniary. So you can do proximity searches and see if there are any records in the surrounding parishes for your family name. Pretty cool feature for the tech-experts at: .

That’s my meme – Techno#Genea ™ and I am sticking to it.

February 17, 2015

Citizen, Soldier, Ancestor in Pictures – Wordless Wednesday #Meme

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Arrival 1910

Edward Jozef Pieszczochowicz WWI

WWI Draft 1917

Edward Jozef Pieszczochowicz Natl

Pet. Natl. Granted 1918

Edward Joseph Pieszczochowicz

Born: 16-OCT-1892, Stopnica, Kieleckie Gubernia, Poland (Russian-Poland partition); Akt #268 in Stopnica 1892 Births

Arrival: 28 May 1910,  Age: 17; from his father Leon Pieszczohowicz in Busko, Kielce to his uncle Jan Pieszczohowicz in West Seneca, NJ on SS Kroonland

WWI Draft: 1917

Petition For Naturalization (Granted): 2-October-1918

Discharged From Military Duty: 21-December-1918

Edward gets his citizenship while he is still in the Army (Camp Zachary Taylor, KY)! Notice he did not need to file a Declaration Of Intent – another benefit of serving in the military.


World War I – Service Record

January 25, 2015

Resources For Albanians in Southern Italy #Genealogy — #Albania

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Calabria Region

Calabria Region

In my wife’s family tree we have two branches of Albano-Italians (Arbëresh):

Augustine = D’Agostino (in Italy and early ship manifests)

They come from, Carsoli, in Aquila (Province), Abruzzo (region) of Italy  [eastwards from Rome]

The Di Lazzaro, Todaro branches going backwards from my wife’s great-grandmother are from:

Castroregio (commune), subdivision of Castrovillari, in Cosenza (Province), Calabria (region) of Southern Italy

Castroregio =  Kastërnexhi (Albanian)

Both branches appear to be Albanians (Arbëresh) and were founding families from 15th century migration from Albania to the remote Italian states of the Southern of Italy and even a few in Sicily too. These were from the Princes of Albania and their retinue and warriors.


Castroregio is online in –

Italy, Cosenza, Castrovil…on (Tribunale), 1866-1910-> Cosenza-> Castroregio

Its State Archive (in Castrolvillari branch office of Cosenza) – Contact / Research Info —

This had no online record images as other Italian State Archives did .

Carsoli – In Antenati –

Inventory of State (Italy) Archives Online –

Twenty-Six State Archives in Antenati with > 26 Million images Online –





January 24, 2015

Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin?

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter had an interesting blog recently …

The premise, “Are There 1/2 Cousins?”, intrigued Stanczyk.

One of my pet peeves is a term that I see online over and over: someone claiming to be a “half first cousin” or a “half second cousin once removed” or something similar. Sorry folks, but there is no such thing as a “half first cousin” according to legal dictionaries. However, the term is used…

January 23, 2015

Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro Augustine — #Genealogy of Albano-Italians

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


page 1 of Birth Record 13

This week Stanczyk ventured far afield to … Castroregio. Where?

Exactly, I did not know where. My wife’s Great Grandmother, Mary Augustine was a Muslim !!! An Albanian Muslim. But when I started trying to find “Castorregio” [sic] from an USA record, I kept being shuttled off to Castroregio … Italy???

It turns out that the commune/settlement of Castroregio a part of Castrovillari in the Costenza Province in the region of Calabria, Italy. It is southern Italy up the pennisula north of the heel of the boot. It is also across the Adriatic Sea from Albania.

Ok, I accepted that fact. Now did have any online records/images of it? Yes. Their title:

Italy, Cosenza, Castroville. (Tribunale), 1866-1910URL:

Birth Record #13 — Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

I knew her father’s name was Diomede and that her birth date should be: 13 Jun 1871. These were from US records.

I had Mary Dellazarro for  name. The birth record said in the margin: Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

OK, so Mary was Maria and Maria’s middle name was Giuseppe. I was in the Civil Records for Castroregio in 1871. The final di Diomede was who her father was (his first name). Ok that was very good too. Diomede was not a common name. But how could I possibly know this was my Mary Dellalazzaro Augustine? The baby’s birth date was 13 Jun 1871 .  OK I was now certain I had the birth record of my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother. The birth date was an exact match from US records! This happens so seldom among my immigrant ancestors. It is usually a few days one way or another.

So now I had my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother, Mary’s birth record from Italy. It was in the civil records and the religion was listed as unknown/none-followed (not Muslim, but I could accept that might not be a popular label). But these were Italians or so I thought. After all these were records from Calabria, Italy. Perhaps they had migrated from Albania at some point, but when?

I also had my wife’s 2x great-grandparent’s names: Diomede Di Lazzaro of course. But I also had Mary Todaro too. I’ll save the suspense for another time. I found Diomede & Mary ‘s marriage record too. So I had another generation’s names (3x great grandparents on both Di Lazzaro & Todaro sides). The marriage record also gave me the full birth date of both newlyweds too! Bonus. I like Italian records – more info than my usual Russian-Poland records.

How was I able to read the records? It was not quite the same as Latin (which I knew well enough from Poland). I also was a bit let down by my Hoffman & Shea book, “Following The Paper Trail“. The book did not have a sample of Italian paragraph form. Thankfully, I can read old handwriting pretty well and Google’s translator worked well too and I was reading Italian. The form was very similar to the Napoleon Codex form I was used to from the Russian-Poland records I routinely deal with.

Finally, Google found me several web sites that described the Albanian migration to Italy which was actually a reward to the Albanian hero-king, Skanderbeg! These people were Albanians and they still communicated in their language and even today you may see signs in two languages (Albanian & Italian) for the place names in this region. I also found a Lazzaro in Berat, Albania. It turns out that the TODARO family was in the retinue of the original Albanian Soldiers of Skanderbeg. They were one of forty families that had migrated from Albania about  400 years earlier! Many of these families were Christians too. It turns out they were Eastern Rite Catholics (Orthodox Catholics) due to their connection  Byzantium and Constantinople. Skanderbeg was Orthodox Catholic, then Muslim then converted back to Orthodox Catholic again – so  being Muslim or Catholic was not a problem for these Albanians. They were ALBANIAN (Arbëresh) and that and their connection to Skanderbeg was what mattered to them!

January 22, 2015

Genealogy & Stamps ; Miscellanea In The Records — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


1870 Stamp in Civil Record Books for Castroregio, Italy

1870 Stamp in Civil Records

Stanczyk loves genealogy (hence this blog). But this jester also loves creative artwork in ephemera or like postage stamps. What I love best is when I see these things in church books while doing genealogy research.

I suppose this was the way to collect fees for church services or civil services. My first stamp is a recent find from the Kingdom of Italy, Calabria Province, Cosenza, village of Castroregio from 1870. I recently found 4 of my wife’s 3x great grandparents (only 28 more to go) in this village and its civil registration books. On the top of every facing pages (a two page set) on the right hand page at the top is this stamp. I only had a few years online in FamilySearch,org, so I do not know if the stamp changes over time. The man commemorated is King Victor Emmanuel II .


Poland 1949

Poland1949StampsThese two 5 zloty stamps are from Poland, post World War II. They were found on a 1949 Birth Extract of an 1887 birth of Wiktoria Heliasz born in Biechow.



Russian-Poland Stamps

twoStamps_1880A_smallTake a look at these two stamps. Your eyes are not fuzzy, the writing is Cyrillic characters and in the Russian language. These were from an 1880 Alegata Church Record. Notice the cancellation mark on the left stamp isan ‘X’ with the dual date:

17/29 August 1880

The dual dates are because Russia was on Julian Calendar, while Poland was on Gregorian Calendar and these were twelve days apart in 1880. It is nice that these online records were in color so you could see exactly how the stamps looked.


Austrian-Poland Stamps

1880Stamps_OnBaptismalCertificateThe above five stamps are from  Austrian-Poland partition. They were on an 1880 Baptismal Certificate. I love the Austrian Empire’s elaborate detail (hard to see in these stamps).


This next stamp is also from Austrian-Poland. It was on a 1904 Birth Extract with a stamp from 1898  – very nice color and detail shown.






An Alegata for citizens of two Empires

AustrianStamp_RussianStamp_1886The above two stamps are from the year 1886. It was taken from an 1886 Alegata where the groom was from Krosno in Galicia (Austrian Empire) and the Bride was from  Russian-Poland (Russian Empire). The testimony of baptism was used as proof that the couple could be married in the church. The 50 krone [left stamp] is the Austrian stamp and the 60 kopec [right stamp] was the Russian stamp. I guess each church collected a fee for this marriage to be documented. Latin & Cyrillic all mashed-up.

Because Stanczyk’s ancestors were on one side of the Vistula/Wisla River (Russian-Poland side) and the in-laws were south of the Vistula/Wisla River (Austrian-Poland side) these kind of marriages were somewhat common.  Just cross the bridge at Szczucin. I guess this kind of emigration was allowed by the two empires. The bride was most likely the immigrant (the groom had military duties to fulfill or taxes to pay or work to perform for some royal business).


Do not forget to examine the stamps they have a story to tell too.

Have you seen any interesting postage stamps in your research? Then drop me an email.


January 17, 2015

Jakob Eliasz, The First Pacanow Eliasz ? — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Jacob Eliasz married Susanna Parszenska on 4-October-1797 in Swiniary

Stanczyk’s direct paternal lineage goes through Pacanow, SwietoKrzyskie, Poland [powiat Buski, gmina Pacanow]. Today there numbers about 1275 people [source: ]. Its parish, located in Pacanow is Sw. Marcin. The church has been honored as a basilica, by the Vatican. This region has been part of a few wojewodztwa, In the LDS Microfilm its located under Kielce wojewodztwo/gubernia with its records 1875-1905 written in Russian that means it was last in the Russian partition of Poland. Its records from the AP can be found online at GenBaza:,list,52754,1

So  we have: C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon->Chester S. Eliasz->Joseph Eliasz->Jozef Elijasz->Marcin Eliasz (b. about 1819). So this blogger’s great-great-grandfather is Marcin Eliasz (aka Elijasz) born about 1819, as deduced from his death record in 1879 Pacanow [Akt #60]. So 1819 (or probably a bit earlier than that) is the oldest known direct ancestor from Pacanow. There are a few other lines that go back that far but they are not my direct line, nor even properly connected to our branch.

But recently while going through Swiniary parish, nearby to Pacanow, I found a marriage record from 1797 !  The groom was Jakob Eliasz age 40, from Pacanow (and House #1 too). Jakob was a widower. His age of 40 implies a birth year of about 1757. The birthplace is unknown for certain but it could have been Pacanow. His bride was Zuzanna Paszenska age 23, a maiden (her 1st marriage) and she lived in Oblekon village in Swiniary parish. The two witnesses were Franciszek Zyglicki [an affiliated family name] and the Economa of Huta Oblekon, Grzegorz Ciescelski. Ok, I cannot say with certainty that Jakob was in Pacanow from 1757, but DEFINITELY he lived in house #1 of  Pacanow in 1797 as a widower.

1797 Context

During these days (Jakub & Zuzanna), the history of Pacanow, it was after the third partition of Poland in January 1796. From every pulpit announced these areas were a part of the Austrian Emperor, Franz II ‘s empire. In this way Pacanow became part of the district of Stopnica [source: ].

Later, Pacanow was a part of the Duchy of Warsaw during Napoleon’s era until June 1815. Afterwards, the Congress of Vienna ceded the area to become part of the Polish Kingdom (aka Congress Poland) and part of the Russian Empire.

Earliest History

Pacanów was first mentioned in a church document from 1110 – 1117,  issued by the  Bishop of Kraków Maur, in which construction of St. Martin church was confirmed. At that time, the village probably belonged to a man named Siemian, who was also mentioned in the document. The existence of the parish church was confirmed on August 1219 by Bishop of Kraków Iwo Odrowąż .

In 1265, the village was granted Magdeburg rights by Prince Bolesław V, the Chaste. In the same period, a number of other local villages were also granted town charters (Połaniec, Nowy Korczyn, Koprzywnica and Opatowiec). The original charter of Pacanów has not been preserved, but in a document issued on February 26, 1603, King Zygmunt III Waza stated that Pacanow had been incorporated as a town in 1265.

Jakub & Zuzanna Eliasz

Past experience has shown that house #1 is usually the nearest to the church and sometimes denotes a person of some means. So perhaps 40 years  old Jakob was a “catch” for the 23 year old Zuzanna. Perhaps my direct lineage run through Jakob and Zuzanna. But, what is certain is they are earliest documented ELIASZ [Eliaszow] in Pacanow. Now can I find some distant cousin who is descended from Jakob & Zuzanna?

January 16, 2015

RAOGK is Back — #Genealogy #Volunteer #Collaborate

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


RAOGK (Random Acts Of Genealogical Kindness) is back. Their website is trying to rebuild the database of volunteers. The RAOGK pages on Facebook appear to be unconnected but were created to fill the void when disappeared a few years ago.

Welcome back back RAOGK!  If any of you are Polonia in the USA or are from Poland, then email me and I’ll note it here in the blog. In my day, I too was a RAOGK volunteer.

Now you can provide raogk via Facebook groups (and yes even through the old Yahoo Groups that pre-dated Facebook), volunteer to do indexing through a local society or through, (or other Indexing projects, like Ancestry’s World Archives Project). I have been a part of many of those too as well hanging out in Rootsweb/Ancestry forums.

Genealogy is collaborative. If you can go back 30+ generations (less if you are Polish like this blogger), then you are related to me and you  are helping family. At least that is how I think about it. Also many have paid me this kindness, how can I not pay it forward too?

Collaborate … Volunteer its good for you and for all.

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