Archive for ‘Kielce’

May 28, 2019

My 4th Cousin (once removed) Martha

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Martha’s Family
If Stanczyk may, let me gush over a 4th cousin who went to Poland & remembered this jester! Her name is Martha.

I did not know Martha’s family name from Pacanow. After we worked together I was surprised to see a connection between my 2x great-grandfather Jozef Elijasz and her ancestors! I even found one female, Salomea ELIJASZ that I previously did not know who had married into her family.

She traveled all around Poland meeting her family and doing tourist things. Then she visited the ancestral villages: Biechow & Pacanow (a shared ancestral village). The church pictures & cemetery pictures were sublime. We worked remotely on a church record & I was able to let her know about her friend’s ancestor (Dubiński) being born in Nowy Korczyn & they were able to make a quick jaunt down there for research. Genealogy is truly collaborative. I was envying my 4th cousin’s genealogical adventure.

Then she made her way to the AP Archive in Kielce. She took a ton of pictures and I was able to learn from her sharing her experience & expertise at AP Kielce. She took this jester’s wish list and made a HUGE dent with her finds! More on this tomorrow.

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December 27, 2018

2019 #Genealogy #Goals — AP Kielce (Polish Archive)

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

AP in Kielce (via SzukajWArchiwach)AP in Kielce

Stanczyk is always looking for information about his paternal 2nd-great-grandfather (prapradziadek), Marcin Eliasz or his great-grandfather Tomasz Leszczynski.  So it is not a surprise that these two ancestors would top my list of 2019 genealogy goals. I would also like to find my aunt Alice Eliasz Stickney’s (Aleksandra Elijasz) birth record from Pacanow parish in 1909 or 1910. So those would be my heartfelt desires for my genealogical research.

So my best bet may be utilizing the AP in Kielce.

Now most people probably think of finding parish church metrical records or USC record in the archive and these are undoubtedly the most popular use of the online version of the archive (szukajwarchiwach.pl). Of course, at present,  very little of the archive is actually online, beyond its metadata.

I clicked on the one in the red box. Oddly, the text appears to be Czech. It’s not Polish and Russian has no diacriticals. When I clicked, I got the details (shown below). I also highlighted some pertinent areas in red.

At the top, we see “21/145/0/-/1189” that is the full reference #, if you needed to request this from an archivist. I also highlighted the “1189” the last part as it is a kind of file #. I know the year is important for my research, hence the “1886”. I also knew that the # of pages (strony) of “26” would be important too. Finally, at the bottom, I pointed an arrow to the Polish text for the description (that I thought was Czech—).

You could translate the Czech or the Polish, but my understanding of Polish/Polish genealogy, led me to use that instead. So, I went to Google Translate and pasted the Polish (that I selected and copied – not shown).

Now it became really interesting to me. It appears to be about my great-great-grandfather(prapradziadek), Martin Eliasz who died in 1879 and who lived/died in Pacanow. Readers of this blog may remember, a blog article back a bit, where I found an historical newspaper account in “Gazeta Kielecka” from 1879 where my 2x great-grandfather was attacked by horse thieves and there was a mention of his father’s barn in the crime story.

So perhaps by emailing the archive, I will try to acquire the file, with its 26 pages to see if there is a bit of probate history  on Marcin Eliasz (show above) and at least inquire about Aleksandra Elijasz (my aunt / ciotka), daughter of Jozef Elijasz & Waleria Leszczynska born in either 1909 or 1910.

Does anyone have any tips for bank wires or money transfers to the Polish Archives? If so please email or post a comment to this blog post. Dziękuję!

Good searches a Happy New Year 2019 / Szczęśliwego Nowego Roku 2019 r.


P.S.

Here are some other metadata that look interesting…

Fond #YearPagesDescription (in English)

21/40/0/6.2/3396
1904-1910n/a Biechów easement, village Wójcza – Joseph Eliasz  and the others  complaint against the Commissioner resolution of 9 August 1905 for No. 107
21/145/0/-/1139188527
 Investigation of Aniela and Kacper Pawłowski, Marianna Eliasz and Walenty Palucha with Antoni Wojtys for ownership of real estate in the village of Pacanów
21/2461/0/-/701910 (or possibly 1909).n/a
1875-1912 for birth, marriage, death, & alegata
 In particular, 1909 – 1912 [inclusive] since those are not available online.
21/1/0/-/62241822-1863n/a
1822-1863  Files regarding the cemetery in Pacanów
21/7/0/-/541854-1860116
1854-1860 Pacanów Cemetery burials,contributions – name list]
21/2519/0/-/151932-1948n/a
Register of inhabitants of the Pacanów settlement:  (various streets ref #14-#19.
21/1/0/-/25511817-1823n/a
[Detailed files regarding] Privileges of the city of Pacanów
October 5, 2018

Genetic Genealogy & Polish Family Tree

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, like most family historians is proud of his heritage and research. Today’s pics are just a small part.

Martha – via Siwiec, Wojtys, Lewinski, Eliasz

Jon/Jan – via Marzic, Zasucha, Eliasz

The two pics represents two wings of this jester’s family tree.

This jester does not employ genetic testing for a variety of business/legal reasons.

However, now twice genetic genealogists have used my tree to solve their genetic mysteries.

Now this jester has maintained that the people (osob) of Biechow, Pacanow, Zborowek, Szczebrzusz, Olesnica, Stopnica, Beszowa, Swiniary, Solec(-Zdroj), and Dobrowoda parishes (parafia) including their surrounding villages are inter-related.

So I have been only too happy to work with other genealogists. Genealogy is easily the best suited field of study for crowd-source solutions and collaborating on family tree & histories. My feeling is that I am helping others who are connected to me and through our mutual research we will discover those connections. Indeed that is the raison d’etre of this blog. Its meant to be a cousin magnet. I have benefited as much as the other genealogists. Sometimes I get pictures of distant cousins, sometimes pictures of myself or my father or grandmother that I did not know existed (and obviously did not have). Often I get get new avenues of research in branches that were long lost.

Back to the pictures. John Marzic (right pic) is a person from an affiliated family of an affiliated family (Zasucha). I worked with a genetic genealogist, Kathy G. and we found her cousin’s cousin who was adopted as child and we found his birth family. John Marzic turned out to be the missing father and through extensive testing of many people not shown, the genetics provided the info to connected John Marzic to myself. I did not even know John’s son’s name, just that he grew up Michigan and was connected to Pacanow (my grandfather’s birth village) and might be related to a Zasucha. Remember a blog “Searchin’ For Zasucha”? It and a few other Zasucha blogs drew Kathy’s attention. We worked together, me using geneteka and genbaza and aiding on the USA side in odd bits here and there. Kathy did the suspected families (from Pacanow to Niagara Falls(NY) to Albion(MI) to Nevada). She did the genetic testing of the probable branches and we succeeded. I did NOT know her “cousin’s cousin, the adoptee”!

The left picture shows a FB genealogist who worked with me to connect our trees! Martha had so many wide branches I had no idea of. Through her I even found Eliasz that I did not know of connected to her ancestors (through marriage). We did connect our trees. I like to add the branches leading to the genealogists connected to me. So I was surprised when Martha messaged me recently about a SF person who was highly connected to her genetically (long cm strands and many strands). Martha started describing to me and I knew at once she was connected to my Marzic/Zasucha branch (so yet another path to Martha and me). They are at far branches and yet they are connected via genetics. But it was my branches (and I suppose my untested genetics too) that connected them. Through her MRCA numbers from her to him & vice versa (slightly different 3.4 generations & 3.6 generations), I was able to count up my tree from her and from him and tell her the most likely branches she needed to pursue. In her case it was her Lewinski branches & Wojtys branches (oddly enough not the Eliasz nor the Zasucha).  Counting back from John Marzic (or really his son) I ended up at Lewinski & Wojtys the same as for her. The Eliasz & Zasucha are merely stepping stones between these two families. Kathy G, if you are still reading my blog, then look at Martha (left pic with arrow). Her DNA is up on some genealogy website(s). Your cousin’s cousin has another set of family branches to add to his tree.

By the way, Martha & Kathy, I have a friend, Louis Kessler who is a genealogist, blogger, & a programmer who does genetic genealogy. He has some excellent dna triangulation software  on his website.

April 15, 2018

Poland Genealogy Between 1918-1939

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has noted an uptick in interest in my Army Conscripts (poborowe) pages.

  1. Conscript Lists of Kieleckie Wojewodztwo
  2. Genealogy in Poland Between The Wars (1918-1939, Conscript Lists)

Here is a link to Google Doc (large PDF):

1932 Conscript List — https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AGfIiAjrkiwSvopGOBYSFx7W96-8jIR_

March 24, 2018

Polish Genealogy Blog — #RussianPoland #partition #KielceGubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 Stopnica and surrounding areas: Pacanow, Biechow, Olesnica, Zborowek, ...

Click for Full Size image

The parishes on this map (large) are the predominant parishes that Stanczyk writes about. So If you ancestral villages are here or more generally in Kielce (Kieleckie) Gubernia /  Wojewodztwo  (now SwietoKrzyskie) then you can learn some useful information to help you in your genealogy research. Feel free to email questions too!

Parishes (partial list) / Parafia (Russian-Poland partition):

Beszowa, Biechow, Olesnica, Ostrowce, Pacanow, Polaniec, Ruda, Solec, Stopnica, Swiniary, Szczebrzusz, Zborowek


Below the Visutla River / Wisla  Rzeka (Austrian-Poland partition):

Slupiec, Suchy Grunt, Szczucin, Wadowice Dolny, Wolka

 

March 22, 2018

Conscription Lists of Kieleckie Województwo — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1932 Kielce Conscript ListOn St. Patrick’s Day, Stanczyk wrote about two Conscription Lists (poborowi) from the 1930’s in Kielce Woj. There were 9,300++ records of families in this province/state whose son was born between 1891-1911.

Now this being an era immediately preceding World War 2, it is important to Jewish genealogists whose families lost 6 million family members, about 3 million in Poland alone (even 1 million Christian Poles) were lost to NAZI concentration camps. So alternative sources are critical.

That makes these Conscript Lists vital. In, my analysis of the smaller list (1933 had 2,000 families), almost 25% were Jewish families! So between 1932 & 1933 there were 9,300 families listed. If that 25% holds for both years, then Jewish genealogists can locate about 2,325 families (a conscript, man & his parents). The conscript is listed with his birth year, and residence. So that is some good data for genealogists, plus you can see the original spelling of the family name.

I am hopeful that I will have a laptop soon and be able to build a database of these vital records. Until then you can contact this jester via email and ask about your family (must be from Kielce Województwo) and I’ll look through the two Conscript Lists for you.

If your ancestor is from another Polish Województwo then you can search online archives or digital libraries for “poborowi” to locate conscript lists from those Województwa.

January 4, 2016

Kielce Holdings Possible in GenBaza … — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielcach Archive Holdings

              partial pdf table of Kielce church/synagouge books

Stanczyk, was looking at the GenBaza news of what was being indexed and loaded in order to see what was coming online (… eventually). This jester noticed a PDF document of the inventory of books at Diocessan Archives (AD), State Archive (AP) and in some of the parishes too.

Now let me hasten to add that this is NOT an inventory of online records/images. It is only a list of what may yet come and of course some of these are already online, but many more are just potential data available to be indexed and loaded.

The actual PDF document is here . A final note the Fond# is similar to what the Library of Congress calls a Record Group. It is the identifier for requesting the resource inside the archive. Only State Archives have a Fond#, not the church archive nor the church parish.

 

 Fond #  Place Name Date Range Books Count Count of Images     NOTES
Bebelno 1787-1864  13 1,174  AD
Bejsce 1586-1862  37 3,966  AD
Biechów 1674-1855  50 3,598  AD
355 Pacanów 1875-1908 64 3,703  AP
373 Pacanów moj 1875-1912  55 1,957  AP (jewish)
399 Pałecznica 1861-1911  77 3,235  AP
November 11, 2015

Dobrowoda & Fras/Frass Genealogy — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dobrowoda Dobrowoda, “Good Water” indeed. Its about 15-16 km from my paternal grandmother (babcia/Busia), Waleria’s ancestral village (Biechow). Waleria Leszczynska’s (half-)sister, Agnieszka married her 2nd husband, Wladyslaw Fras … somewhere (I am still looking for that marriage). Agnieszka & Waleria (the Leszczynscy) were born in Biechow so you might expect their marriage was there in the bride’s village as is custom.  But let me start this genealogical story from the beginning.

A few years ago, my family tree on the Internet caused someone to email me about my Leszczynski. For years, other genealogists had emailed about LESZCZYNSKI, so I was used to saying, “Its a popular name and we are not related or are so distantly related that we cannot prove it.” But this person had a name, Agnieszka Leszczynski, which I had one too in my tree, but she was born so long ago (1866) that I only had a birth record and nothing more for Agnieszka Leszczynski. But she had a Russian Passport (which she could not read). I had never seen an actual Russian Passport before, so I told her I would look at it and help translate what info I could and perhaps that will tell us whether there is a chance that her ancestor (great-grandfather), Jozef Fras, was son of my Agnieszka Leszczynski or not. Long Story-Short, the passport gave clues to the same area, tantalizingly close to Biechow — so I could neither prove nor disprove the relationship, but it was an avenue for research. So I started researching her Fras/Frass from Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. They were close to where my grandparents and my grand-aunt, Antonina Leszczynska Sobieszczanski lived. Ok that added a very tenuous connection.  I found a church baptism where Jozef Fras’s wife, BENIGNA (not a common name) was a God Mother to one of my dad’s Sobieszczanski cousins. Ok. that is a pretty good connection. Next I found Jozef’s ship manifest and that his father was Wladyslaw Fras living in Piersciec, a village in the same parish as my grandmother’s family. Ok that is a great connection. Oh, look Jozef went from his father, Wladyslaw, to his uncle Teofil Leszczynski (my grand-uncle) in Depew, Erie County, NY. Ok that is a solid family indicator. So I emailed Mindy to tell her that we were probably related and I added Fras to my family tree.

So Mindy sent me family photos of other Fras family from Poland. So I knew Jozef had two brothers and a sister (maybe) and I had their names. From the passport I had a birthdate / birthplace for Jozef (Zborow – which I initially mistook for Zborowek, but later realized he meant the Zborow near Solec, at any rate both were in Kielce gubernia. So I had Biechow and Solec as possible parishes to research. Eventually GenBaza published images online and I could progress, I did find Jozef’s siblings: Teofil & Wincenty(and two sisters born in Piestrzec/Piersciec). But I could not find Jozef and I also could not locate Wladyslaw and Agnieszka’s marriage record in Biechow or Solec (nor in Stopnica). I began to research in nearby parishes (cluster genealogy) looking for either the birth or the marriage record. Years went by and no luck.

Did I mention that GenBaza went offline due to technical problems? It did and when it came back I noticed a few new parishes, hence Dobrowoda (which was >= 15km away) and I doubted that a parish at such a distance might yield any new clues. However, earlier I had found a church record in Stopnica of a Fras birth, where a Wladyslaw Fras was God Father. I then found the marriage and alegata for the couple whom Wladyslaw was God Father for. It turned out that Fras was originally from Silesia [Uiejsce, in Wojkowice Koscielne parish, in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia, Poland]. I found this Fras’ birth record and now had his parents (possibly Wladyslaw’s parents or maybe just uncle/aunt). Using Geneteka as an index, I found other children for Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas, besides this Stopnica Fras. This family went from Wojkowice Koscielne parish in Piotrkowskiej Gubernia to Holudza village in Chotel Czerwony parish, in Kielce Gubernia. OK now we are getting close. I found Jan Fras’ death record in Kikow village in Dobrowoda parish (also Kielce Gubernia). So when Dobrowoda came online, I decided I would look there once GenBaza came back online.

That is where this blog entry starts. There were many years and I was not expecting any Fras really. So I started in Zborowek instead which now had metrical records and not just alegata like before. Some minor advances, but nothing really. So I looked at Dobrowoda. There were many years in Dobrowoda and my eyes went right to a book that ended in ‘rejestr’. These ‘rejestr’ tend to be church censuses, sometimes just an annual census, sometimes a decade, sometimes two-three generations. So I thought I could quickly scan and see if there were any Fras or not in this parish.

It was just an annual census (my hopes were lowered) for 1895 sorted alphabetically with Birth Marriage and Death records indexed together (in a funky Polish handwriting – that I had to train my eyes to read). Ok there was a Fras, a Teofil Fras. But I had already found my Teofil Fras born in 1903, so this Teofil Fras born in 1895 must be for another family. Nonetheless, I wanted the record to see if Wladyslaw or Agnieszka Fras were a God Parent or witness. So I was shocked to find that this Teofil Fras was also a child of Wladyslaw Fras and Agnieszka Leszczynska. This Teofil must have died and thus the second Teofil was born in 1903 (who is the one in my picture with Wincenty). Ok this parish had my Fras. Maybe I can find the birth of Jozef and/or the marriage of Wladyslaw & Agnieszka here. From the passport, I knew that Jozef was born in 1893, so I went to that year. Guess what I found? Yes, I finally found Jozef Fras’  birth record and the date matched as well as the parents.

Alas, I still did not find the marriage record of Wladyslaw and Agnieszka, but now I have hope. I hope I can find their marriage and also Wladyslaw’s birth (once I confirm that his parents are indeed Jan Fras & Maryanna Bialas). You must persevere. These affiliated families (like Fras) can indicate parishes to research in for your main lines and shorten your cluster genealogy search. But as you saw, Dobrowoda was indeed good water for Stanczyk.


Jozef Fras birth record:

Jozef Fras Akt #23

Jozef Fras Akt #23

December 22, 2014

1772 Polish Wojewodztwo, Diocese, and Deaconates — #Polish #Genealogy #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_ParishesInPoland_mapXVIsegmentStanczyk is busy with holiday chores, including wishing you, my dear readers a Happy Holidays & a Happy, Healthy New Year too. As most regular readers know, I spend a lot of my time writing about genealogy with a focus on Polish genealogy and in particular in the geographical areas surrounding my paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages (Biechow & Pacanow in old wojewodztwa Kieleckie, now a part of SwietoKrzyskie woj.). Like most areas in and around Eastern /Central Europe the borders change … frequently. So today’s blog article is about 1772 just before the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth was partitioned amongst the neighboring empires (you know who you are/were, you Black Eagle Empires).

It is interesting to note that Pacanow was a much more important regional village in 1772. It was in fact, a deaconate, subordinate to the diocese of Krakow in the Gniezno Wojewodztwa. At that time, there were only two Wojewodztwo (Provinces): Gniezno in the west and Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg, Leopolis, the city of Lions in whatever language) in the east. Any other wojewodztwo were in the Lithuanian portion of the Commonwealth. So the civil/religious hierarchy of the time was: Poland->Gniezno->Krakow->Pacanow, which  along with Opatowiec deaconate contained most of the villages this author writes about [you might be tempted to toss in Polaniec and Sandomierz too]. That area is shown in the map at the top. I do a lot of research for my family in the above map, west of Polaniec and south of Pinczow (the lower/left quadrant) in almost every parish north of the Vistula (Wisla) river I have located a record for someone in my family tree  —  you might say, the bones of Stanczyk’s DNA are rooted here.

So let me enumerate the parishes from this 1772 map that are present in my genealogy:

Biechow & Pacanow (grandparents), Stopnica, Ksziaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Olesnica, Szczebrzusz, Beszowa, Opatowiec, Busko and probably another 8-9 other villages with a person here or there. I think Solec too, but I have not found that record yet. I also a few stray, unconnected family records from Szczucin (the only parish south of the Vistula … so far). Are these in your bones too? Drop me a line in the New Year and we can compare family trees.

By the way, this research is from the PGSA’s CD-ROM, “The Latin Church in the Polish Commonwealth in 1772” [ISBN – 978-0-924207-12-9 ].

December 7, 2014

1772 Map of Poland’s Wojewodztwo (Provinces) — #Map #Genealogy #Poland

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_Woj_Sandomierski

Today, Stanczyk was surfing the Internet when I came upon a map from 1772. This map was just as the first partition of Poland had occurred. This segment of the map was part of a PDF document from:

http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11294/#regions=europe&countries=PL

Entitled: “Map of Poland: Outlining Its Provinces and Voivodeships, 1772“. The document if 40.5MB and is 59 pages (about half of whom are blank pages). In 1772 the map segment shown above was in Sandomierskie wojewodztwo/voivodeship. The map is a bit blurry/grainy, so I had to annotate the section to show Pacanow and Szczucin and the river Vistula/Wisla between them. This segment is from the upper left of  page 43 of the PDF.

This map encompasses a large part of the area that blogs emphasizes from my genealogical research in the Russian-Poland partition (zabor). The area north of the Vistula will become part of the Russian Gubernia Kielce. The area below the Vistula becomes part of the Austrian-Partition, known as Galicia.

Knowing the geography of your ancestral villages (in my case Pacanow) can aid you in your genealogical research by identifying the civil administrative hierarchy that records the births, marriages, and deaths of the people. It can also help to locate parishes and in planning a proximity search for adjoining parishes that may also have records of your ancestors. So knowing the maps/geography can help the researcher locate data and the skilled use of Gazetteers can get you to your ancestral parish or parishes. Maps also show the changing borders over time and how the civil administrative hierarchies change over time.

A good genealogist will also be good at geography (as well as many other skills) in order to locate and read records of your family’s history.

May 9, 2014

Research Trip … Some #Genealogical Finds — #Polish, #UPGS, 2014

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

18291219_LeszczynskiTomasz_Szczepan_twins_Wolica15

Stanczyk is tired, perplexed and satisfied ! If you love genealogy then you probably love the new finds — not just the elation and the happy dance that ensues, but because most new finds also cause new  questions that need to be solved or addressed.

For years, I have been searching for my LESZCZYNSKI roots (korzenie Leszczynscy). Previously only my friend Jacek from Krakow was able to locate some Leszczynskich in Biechow. He did not tell me his source for these records (no citation) and I have not been able to locate a source for them either — most perplexing. He also left me with, “You might want to look in Stopnica some day.”. That enigmatic quote always lingered with me lo these many years.

Now in January, GenBaza.pl came up with AD_KIELCE and AP_KIELCE scans online!!! By Kielce, I mean the former Wojewodztwo / Gubernia (or the regional Archives, both civil and religious). This is where my ancestral villages have all been located (so far). So I took Jacek’s long ago advice and looked in Stopnica for Leszczynskich   …  But how was I ever to connect the Stopnica LESZCZYNSKICH with my Biechow LESZCZYNSKICH?

Well as I was gorging myself with the ELIASZ of Pacanow in GenBaza, I was using GENTEKA as a kind of index into where I should look in GenBaza (which Years, and which Akts #). So I decided to search for Leszczynski using this method and looking at Births/Marriages/Deaths in Stopnica. There were 29 marriages (małżeństwa) in the parish of Stopnica, a parish I knew rather nothing about, much less the town families. But I stopped dead on one marriage. One Leszczynski, Jan Leszczynski, had a mother with a maiden name, Kordosz. Now I knew that my great-grandfather Tomasz married a Julianna Kordos (born in Swiniary). So I became very interested in Małżeństwa (Marriage) Akt #73 in 1881 Stopnica. Mystery solved! When I read the record I found that Jan’s parents were Tomasz & Julianna z. Kordosz[sic] Leszczynskich and the ages were correct. So I had my missing link to Stopnica. I also knew that Falęcin would be a focal point in the Stopnica parish. So I found all of Jan Leszczynski & Antonina Sieradzka ‘s children born in Stopnica. I also found that Jan had a few siblings who also married in Stopnica and between these Stopnica records and a few new ones in Biechow and examining witnesses and God Parents I had the correct set of records and more confirmations of other family knowledge. But I have digressed. This is a blog about my findings from a Genealogical Conference in Salt Lake City — UPGS, 2014.

As a result of my earlier GenBaza finds, I had new clues/mysteries that needed solving, plus some from other records that I had wanted to research in LDS microfilm. So I went to UPGS to find out if  Kroczyce, Palecznica, and Wolica had any records for me. Here are my BIG finds:

  1. Pelagia Kedzierska‘s birth record, 28-October-1882 in Kroczyce parish.
  2. Maciej Wlecial’s birth record,  28-February-1868 in Laszow, Palecznica parish.
  3. Tomasz Leszczynski ‘s birth record, 19-December-1829 in Wolica (village, parish, gmina).

This jester hit ALL of his major goals. Sure I did not find Jan Leszczynski or Franciszek Leszczynski birth records or Tomasz Leszczynski’s 1st marriage record to Julianna Kordos. But I found Tomasz Leszczynski’s birth record. At least I am 80% sure on Tomasz — I need his marriage record to prove it 100%, but I will now begin to make a case to myself via Social Network Analysis (SNA) whether this is indeed the correct  Tomasz or not.

It turns out that Tomasz’s (20-December-1829) was a twin (Szczepan his twin). I also knew Tomasz’s parents were: Jan Leszczynski, age 30 (-> born about 1799) and Anna Owczarczyk age 29 (-> born about 1800). I also knew the names of the witnesses and the God Parents too. One God Parent made me take note: Tekla Slawinska.  It turns out the Anna had a very rare name: OWCZARCZYK. So I was able to find her marriage record to Jan Leszczynski … in DZIERAZNIA (a nearby parish to Wolica, with many cross marriages). So now I had a fourth major find in my 2x-great-grandparent’s marriage record  19-JULY-1825 in Dzieraznia parish (village/gmina/powiat) of Szysczya. So now I had the names of yet another generation: Antoni & Katarzyna Leszczynskich. Now I have my 2nd & 3rd great-grandparents in the Leszczynski line. I also had two more parishes: Wolica & Dzieraznia!

A great adventure to be sure. I had many other finds that were not so as notable.  I had success in my Croatian VESPEKs line too. Also a minor confirmation of my wife’s paternal grandmother’s village: Kovesliget (Maramaros region) of Austria-Hungarian (aka Hapsburg) Empire. Kovesliget is now in modern day Romania. The creme-de-la-creme … doing the research while surrounded by  my Polish Genealogy friends at UPGS 2014. Priceless!

February 28, 2014

GenBaza — Jewish Congregations (AP Kielce, AP Sandomierz) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been writing about metryki.genbaza.pl a lot this year and this week in particular. Since I wrote my guide on using GenBaza, I thought I might start enumerating what is actually in GenBaza. So to honor my wife, I thought I would start with the Jewish records.

I compiled my list from two of the archives that I dabble in: AP Kielce and AP Sandomierz.  This roughly covers the area that a genealogy group on the Internet known as KR SIG/ Kielce-Radom Special Interest Group (are they defunct now?  — see JewishGen/JRI-Poland have their materials) used to do research on.

Today’s blog is almost a Wordless Friday blog. I see from the embedded pictures (below) that AP Kielce has 10 congregations data and AP Sanodmierz has 13.KielceRadom

AP_Kielce_mojAP_Sandomierz_moj

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