Archive for ‘Internet’

March 24, 2014

Newspapers.com – #Genealogy, #Polish, #HistoricalNewspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

NewspapersClippings

Stanczyk has been experimenting with Newspapers.com and utilizing their Clippings to frame research topics.

So my current set of clippings are on my profile page: http://www.newspapers.com/profile/michael135/articles .

So if you are interested in Haller’s Army or General Jozef Haller then you may want to check it out. My initial focus is upon General Haller’s 1923 trip to the USA after World War I, in order to honor the men under his command that were in the USA. Then as today there were detractors to the general’s visits — which I had not previously known. His 1923 itinerary included a visit to the Lincoln homestead in Springfield, IL. He also honored the long US-Poland relationship by visiting the Pulaski memorial in D.C. too. I am left to ponder if the 1926 Emblem of Goodwill, “A Polish Declaration of Admiration and Friendship for the United States of America” might not have been influenced or inspired by General Haller.

March 9, 2014

Archiwum Państwowego in Gdańsk & Pomorskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne – 650,000 records scanned/online

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PTG

Stanczyk has news of yet another Polish Archive scanning and going online with vital records (older than 100 years).

The Pomeranian – Gdansk Archive will soon have 650,000 vital records scanned and online by the 2nd qtr this year.

The AP-GDANSK are working with Pomeranian Genealogical Society who already have 2.78Million records indexed and now will get 650,000 scanned images to go with index.

The National Archive (Gdansk) and Genealogical Society will share the online indexes/scans.

Something else to be thankful for this Easter/Passover season.

PomGenBase / PomGenBaza is here … :http://www.ptg.gda.pl/index.php/ptgnews/action/basesearch/

For more details, the full article can be read here [in Polish /po polskiu].

ArchiveArchiwum Państwowego w Gdańsku (AP-Gdansk)

Genealogical Society – Search The Pomorskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne (PTG), which in English translates to the Pomeranian Genealogical Association

February 27, 2014

Guide (Poradnik) for Using Metryki.GenBaza.PL — #Polish, #Archive, #Guide, #Poradnik

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wrote about  metryki.genbaza.pl two months back and the fact they were posting online the state archives (civil) and church archives (diocese) and many people have asked me to write a guide (poradnik) on how to use  Metryki.GenBaza.pl  .

In this guide, I will be using a Macbook laptop with the Safari browser, but you should see just about the same thing with your PC or your browser. Obviously, if you are using a mobile device you user experience will be slightly different may not work if your smartphone is too small.

Œ Œ

Step By Step


Step 1

Step One

            Go to the website: Metryki.GenBaza.pl 

You should see the web site with just the GRODZISK archive shown …

01_Metryki.GenBaza_plYou will need to register for a free account in order to see of the available archives on metryki.genbaza.pl . The link to create a free account will take you back to GenPol.pl and you will need to fight your way through their poor user interface. Their interface (web app) did not indicate to me when it had created the account. But if you go back to metryki.genbaza.pl and click on the Login, you should be able to login to genbaza (using your email and your newly created password). If you are on a mobile device or a small/minimal browser window and do not see Login , then you should see a graphic button with three horizontal lines in upper right corner click on this followed by clicking on Login .

Now that you are logged in to genbaza you should see the following archives …

02_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_loggedIn

Small_2
 
Step Two — Select An Archive

            For this guide, we will be working with AD_Kielce and AP_Kielce and the parish named Biechow. From the above screen shot you can see that we will be using the 1st and the 3rd archives. So if you are following along, then click on AD_Kielce (the church archive -or- Archiwum Diocesan).

You should see …

03_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_ADKielce

Notice it gives you the feedback that you are working with the AD Kielce “Album” contents. Think of this as an iPhoto photo album. Down the left side you will see a list of all available parishes that they have scanned images for. This is NOT a complete list of all parishes in the old province (wojewodztwo or Russian Gubernia) of Kielce, but just the ones they have some subset of images from the Kielce church archive.

The blue words, Bebelno, Bejsce, Biechow … etc. are just parishes. You will need to know the parish of your ancestral village to select the appropriate parish, but that is another blog or two. Let me take one step back, I said parishes, but there are also Jewish congregations / records  too in these online images. These parishes are just sub-directories of the AD Kielce Album. If there had been an image file also, it would be listed on the right side under the Album (or sub-directory) as a set of JPG (graphic file) files that viewable in a browser.

Step 3
 
Step Three — Select A Parish (Congregation)

Let’s click on Biechow . You should see …

04_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_Biechow

You will notice that I have scrolled down a bit from the top. At the top it lets you know that you are in the Biechow Album (sub-directory). There are no files here either. But down the left we see more blue text (that are clickable). Ignore the leading number before the underscore. The middle part is a year or a year range.  The last part, when it is present, is a set of letters.

The latest birth I can get from the AD Kielce (church archive) is 1855. [see 22_1835-1855_ur]. So please excuse me while I switch over to  AP_Kielce in order to work with Biechow births (ur) for 1886.

Decoding the ‘Letters’

These letters (or suffixes if you prefer) are fairly standard (with exceptions). If you see a suffix of,  “_ur”,  that is an indication that when you click on that sub-directory you will find online scanned images of Births (urodzony). So these suffixes are Polish abbreviations for Birth (ur), Marriage (sl), Death (zg) or Alegata (al). Each describes the type images you will see. What if there is no suffix? Then you will probably see  all of the event types: Birth, Marriage, Death and possibly Alegata too.

What is an Alegata (al)? These scanned images are requests to the church for a transcription from the church book or to lookup something like a birth or death possibly or most commonly to support a person’s need to re-marry by showing that s/he is widowed. These are transcriptions copied from the actual church register, by the current pastor of a past event (birth/marriage/death). These are usually accompanied by a fee, collected via stamps on the actual page. If these are present with the other event types, then they are at the end of the images.  Alegata are almost as valuable as the actual church entry. But the alegata can substitute when you do not have the actual church register (or image) available to you.

By the way the final set of letters that I want to mention are, “_moj”. If you see “_moj” as a suffix then that directory’s scanned, online images are of Jewish denomination records. The Moj. is an abbreviation for  mojżeszowe (Mosaic denomination as in Moses),

If you are following along, then you will need to click on the following to switch to 1886 Biechow parish in AP Kielce Archive:

At the top click on “Main page” at the top, then click on AP_Kielce (on left the next page), followed by  clicking on Biechow,  and finally clicking on 1886_023. After all of those clicks you should see …

05_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886

Notice the website gives you a nice trail of breadcrumbs to find your way around all of these directories.  You should see between the top level and the “Album contents”, a line of clickable text:

GenBaza | AP Kielce | Biechow | 1886_023

These are your breadcrumbs that allow you to find your way back. Keep in mind that “Main page” at the top will always bring you back to the original set of Archives to pick from.

 
 Step 4
Step Four — Working With A List of Images

            On the right side you see Album Contents: 1886_023 with a list of scanned images named like :

_k_??????.jpg — where the ?????? are replaced by some consecutive numbers. These files contain one scanned image each. Typically the set of images is a parish register, including the front and back covers, such as they may be. So in practice I seldom look at the first or the last image, because I am too busy to look at book covers.

The images are number consecutively from front cover to last cover with all the pages in between as they are. There are a few possible arrangements of pages. Typically it is Births, then Marriage, then Deaths if the particular register you are looking at has two or more event types. I also see Marriage, then Birth, then Death. Death comes last always. In some parish registers you will also see Alegata and these come after Death if they exist.  Many times Alegata are in their own directory apart from the other vital record events.

Our goal is to avoid having to look at all pages one after another. To do that we must find the indexes that follow each vital record event. For example, after the Births, you usually find a page or two (or more) of an index of all of the births for that year — hopefully in alphabetical order. Sometimes the indexes do not exist. Sometimes the indexes have errors and sometimes a mistake is found and added at the end of the index. Always seek  out the index and look at ALL index pages for your surname(s) to catch these errors.

For this exercise I am going to click on the 27th file, named: _k_088054.jpg . I knew that this file contained the birth index scanned image. It is here that I want to say a few things about working with the scanned images. So clicking on _k_088054.jpg, you should see …

06_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886IndexUR_27

OK the text is in RUSSIAN/Cyrillic handwriting. Many of you cannot read this image. But some images are in Polish and a few are in Latin. So you can usually find somebody who reads these if you cannot read them yourself. But I do urge you to get the Jonathan Shea/Fred Hoffman book, “In Their Own Words” books and learn to read these church records.

In the upper left you will see two tool pallets. The top tool is for adjusting (from top to bottom):  Contrast, Brightness and Zoom. Mostly, you will not need to adjust Contrast or Brightness, but they are there for those who know how to use them to make the scanned images more readable. I do use the Zoom adjustments all of the time. The zoom tool (the bottom pick with a ‘magnifying glass’), you can zoom in (+) or zoom out (-). Depending on the scale of the image scanned and the health of your eyes, you will need to zoom in (+) 4 – 6 times to get a comfortable level of reading. Your eyes may differ.

As you zoom in, you will notice that a gray box in the preview too pallet  gets smaller.  This gray transparent rectangle is the area of image displayed in the viewer window. You can drag this gray square to quickly navigate the viewer window to area of the page I have focused on. The other method of navigating the image is to click on the image viewer, click-and-hold-and drag the image around. So whether you drag the gray box in the preview or click-drag (common called grab) the view image around make it so you can see the Russian ‘L’ and possibly Russian M on the index screen.

NOTE: You can scroll the viewer left-right and up-down, but I would not do that as you may not realize that you have NOT reached the image’s edge and that you need to click-drag some more to move the image to see the remainder of the image that scrolling cannot show you.

Now you my dear reader of this tutorial must indulge me. I want to call your attention to the 4th ‘L’ name in the image (лещунъска  виктория) — yeah, I know cursive Cyrillic does not look much like block letter Cyrillic characters, especially pre-1918 cursive Russian, which were before Bolshevik language reforms. It says, “Leszczynska Wiktorija” 118 (akt#) / 20 (Kart #). We use the Akt # as the record number in the parish register to find this record. This record is my grandmother!

Click on the 23. Do you see where it says “First photo  << 23  24  25   26  27 …  >> Last photo”? Click on the 23, which will take us 4 images before the image we are on (the gray highlighted 27 in the middle). You should see an image with a 124 in the upper left.  If you drag the image around in the viewer (or I find dragging the gray rectangle box in the preview tool) around the page you will see a total of 6 births on this page, number 124 through 129. The image looks like two pages of a parish register (book). The left page has records (akts) 124, 125, 126 and the right page has records 127, 128, 129.

We are looking for my grandmother who is act# 118. 118 is exactly 6 records before the first birth record shown on this page. Since we six births per page, my grandmother’s birth record should be the 1st record on the previous page. So let’s click on the 22 in the: “First photo  << 19  20  21   22  23 …  >> Last photo” near the top. After clicking on 22, you should see …

07_Metryki_GenBaza_pl_APBiechow1886IndexAkt118

Do you see the Akt #118 at the upper left? We have found our record. These particular birth records list the baby’s name at the top. Do you see: Leszczynska Waleryja ? Wait a minute the index said, Wiktorija??? I said before the indexes contain errors. Waleryja Leszczynska is indeed my grandmother and I knew she was born in Biechow parish in 1886,  but it was not until GenBaza put the AP_Kielce images online that I actually could prove her birth date / place.  You can imagine my joy. Now imagine what your joy will be when you find your grandparents!

Notice there is a button at the top,  “Download photo” (Pobierz zdjęcie). The last thing you need to do is download this keepsake image you found.  On a Mac when you do this the image is downloaded to your “Downloads” folder. It also brings up a Preview of the image when the download completes. Close out of of Preview. In your browser is a new tab, “Untitled” with nothing in the window. Close this tab and you will be back in the image viewer tab.  In Windows you get a new browser window (named Untitled), your downloads  window opens and the images goes into whatever Windows directory you download into (typically called Downloads). Likewise, close the Untitled browser window and return to your previous browser window. One note, on the mac the image download is TIFF by default and in Windows it is JPG. So on the Mac when your Preview comes up … click on File menu, then Export menu item and select either PNG or JPEG to get a file format that you can use on the Internet (like on Ancestry.com) for example. The Internet browsers natively work with: JPG/JPEG, GIF or PNG (or PDF too). Keep your images in one of those formats.

There is one more thing I have yet to emphasize. I was trying to teach you that you can jump around the images by doing simple math. We were on Akt# 124 (of records 124 through 129) of six records per page. If my grandmother’s akt# had been 100 (instead of 118) then I would have had to click 4 pages left of page 23 or page 19 on the line,  “First photo  << 19  20  21   22  23 …  >> Last photo”. This little math tip can save you the time of scrolling page after page. I use this tip to navigate more than 4 pages at a time too, but I will leave that exercise for the reader to figure out.

February 1, 2014

Rzeszow Galicia Cadastral Maps – Online in June

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

CadastreMapsRZESZOWStanczyk, was perusing the Polish Genealogical Society Connecticut & NorthEast Facebook page recently and noticed that on 27-January-2014 their posting on digitized cadastral surveys from the State Archives in Przemyśl . The  full text of the Polish State Archive (  http://www.archiwa.gov.pl ) news is posted  here.

By the end of June, the Przemyśl state archives will complete the digitization of Galician cadastral maps started in 2012 of 63,000 pages of descriptive material to the cadastral maps of the villages . The 63,000 pages accompanies 9,084 digitized map sheets of 743 localities of the former province of Rzeszow and 29 more localities now in Ukraine.

Digitized copies of the documents so far will be at the Przemysl archive by the end of March for  study. Afterwards, the scans will be published online at the site:  szukajwarchiwach.pl .

Also See …

Gesher GaliciaInventory of Galicia Cadastral Maps

December 4, 2013

Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie Parish Books

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Wordless Wednesday …

WordlessWed_20131204

September 24, 2013

The Library of Congress & PA State Library — #Genealogy, #Archives, #Libraries

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PAStateLib_1PAStateLib_2

The Library of Congress

(LOC) has published a finding resource listing 71 links to the 50 states, online digital collections. That is found here .

The PA State Library — Has a digital collections, very similar to the digital collections found at seekingmichigan.org [Editor: also in LOC list for MI].

From Abe Lincoln, to Ben Franklin, to Coal Mining History, to WWI there are many PA treasures here:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/collections/8728/digital_collections_at_the_state_library_of_pennsylvania/524375

I chose to start in their WWI Collection,  which had a few choices to pick from, so I chose the top pick (Mahanoy City):

American Red Cross. Pennsylvania Chapter. Mahanoy City. In Memoriam Of Those Who, Coming from the District within the Limits of the Mahanoy City, Red Cross Chapter, Quakake to Girardville [inclusive] Made the Supreme Sacrifice in the Great War for Democracy, known as “The World War” 1917-1919. Mahanoy City, Pa., [1920]
This is a six page memorial to the fallen veterans who lived in Mahanoy City in the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania.

http://accesspadr.org/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/sstlp-wwi&CISOPTR=411&CISOSHOW=405

In truth the PA State Library’s digital collection is large enough that this jester will need to spend some time exploring, but I thought I would share my initial impression.

So LOC, a tip of the jester’s hat  to you for compiling a very useful resource of state libraries who have online digital collections. These are historical in nature, but the obvious application to genealogy make these valuable resources to the genealogical researcher too.

September 15, 2013

Ancestry App v5.0 — #Genealogy, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry5_0

Ancestry.com has updated their app to version 5.0 (iTunes App Store). I like their newest effort.  It looks nice and the User Experience (UX) is improved for the most part. I miss  having a button for showing just the lineal line (not siblings) to save space on the iPhone. Also the UX does not provide ways to go up or down your family tree other than what is displayed on screen (5 generations on iPhone). Why no arrows on top/bottom rows. You can of course click on someone higher up in the tree and see further back generations from that person, but you may not realize that there are prior generations unless you know your tree well. No visual key that more generations exist.

When you upgrade you will  need to download your whole tree again (does that imply their local db changed and needs to be reloaded?) and that takes about 30–45 seconds for a tree of 1,142 people. Small price to pay. I do wonder if the new app is causing problems for the Ancestry.com web site. It has performed slowly and sometimes the app says Ancestry.com is not available. Perhaps mobile app users are putting a bigger strain then online users.

AncestryError

Ancestry.com site problems?

It integrates more closely with Facebook. That did not appeal to me, but for some people it may be just what you want. As a result I do not know what happens when you connect your Facebook profile to a person in the tree (does it post the timeline to your Facebook timeline?).

Besides, Facebook, the app now integrates with Ancestry.com more completely. The app now works a lot like the web site. It does not appear to be missing any features. I like the new Timeline view of a profile … very nice.

The Gallery button on the bottom of the profile view quickly loads your images (much faster). It also automatically searches for hints too. Finally this view has a new feature to find sources (from Ancestry.com?) for your facts. Very nice.

The tight integration to the web site does mean the app switches control to a Safari web-app but the integration is so tight you might not notice the switch to Safari and back to the App

September 7, 2013

Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Stanczyk

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

05September2013_FSFamily Search has updated their Polish Collection & Czech Census too on September 4th & 5th.

Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966; http://bit.ly/X9qxJ8

Poland, Lublin  Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 was also updated: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1867931

Also Czech Republic Censuses 1843-1921:  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1930345

Add  Family Search Wiki Page if your genealogy research area is Poland:

https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Poland

Images and indexes of church books containing baptisms and births, marriages, burials and deaths for the parishes in the Radom & Lublin Roman Catholic Dioceses of Poland.

Births end in 1912,

Marriages endin 1937, and

Deaths end in 1982    due to Polish privacy rules.

August 28, 2013

Twerk, Selfie, Bitcoin, Others Added To Oxford Dictionary As Silicon Valley, Middle Schoolers Push English Language Forward

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

OEDThe revered OED, that is the Oxford English Dictionary to you neophytes of the English Language, has added:

Twerk, MOOC, Bitcoin, geek chic, selfie, and so much more to the language (see Tech Crunch article: Twerk, Selfie, Bitcoin, Others Added To Oxford Dictionary As Silicon Valley Pushes English Language Forward ).

• See the complete list .

Stanczyk wants to know from the academes out there, do blogs and/or social media extend the English language into other modern languages as well as OED English?

Is the world becoming #MultiLingo ?

Will the growth of these cross-language words ever increase to such a degree that languages begin to converge or what percentage of overlap makes a language distinct (or the same)?

Email me !

August 12, 2013

Oracle 12c – Multi-Tenant Databases — #STEM, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle12c

Oracle 12c

Oracle’s newest database (version 12c) has many new features, the discussion of which are too big for a single blog article (or even a series of blogs). The substantial high-level bulleted list of new features is in the 12c New Features Manual . But the concepts and low level SQL language details show a much larger change then you might perceive.

Multitenant Database

The new paradigm shift, Multitenant Databases, will stop DBAs pretty quick, particularly in Windows where the installer creates a Container DB. Previous to 12c, all databases were Non-Container DBs. With 12c you can create a Non-Container DB or a Container DB. The Container DB can have zero, one, or more Pluggable DBs within. A Non-Container DB can never have a Pluggable DB. So that becomes an upfront database creation decision.

You can and you should read the Oracle Intro to Multitenant Databases .

I first relaized the Oracle Installer had created a container database for me when I went through the normal process of creating a database user using the same old techniques I always did and received an Oracle Error: ORA-65096. WHAM, I slammed right into the new paradigm without me even knowing it existed. The error description and the necessary action introduced to another part of the Multitenant Database paradigm: Comon User vs. Local User. That quickly led to Containers. Of course, with any new features, comes an array of new database schema tables like, v$pdbs for example. You will also probably use a new Sql*Plus command a LOT: SHOW CON_NAME to know what container (root or pluggable database) you are connected to. Some DBA commands must be done in the root container (CDB$ROOT). Your pluggable databases (in Windows) will be by default: PDB$SEED and PDBORCL. Every container database has precisely one seed pluggable database from which all pluggable databases are created from.

This paradigm shift will be  seriously disorienting feeling to long time DBAs, especially if were not aware this was coming. Fortunately, there are many DBA bloggers out there sharing their 12c experiences. They were a help for me to gather the necessary jargon. But it was not until I discovered that Oracle had created a tutorial on Multitenant Databases and I had spent an hour or two playing with the tutorial on my newly created sandbox database (on Windows) which was by default a Container DB. This tutorial is an excellent way to jump start your understanding of the new paradigm.

By the way, I think either the default should be a NON-CONTAINER DB (so you are backwards compatible) or the Oracle Intsaller needs to make it clear that a CONTAINER DB will require new DBA processes (i.e. a learning curve) and give you an OVERT option to create a NON-CONTAINER DB for backwards compatibility.

Conclusion

Read the Oracle Introduction to Multitenant Databases to understand the concepts. Then immediately work your way through the tutorial in a test database that is a Container DB. Ultimately, I think Container DBs are the way to go. I think this is what you want to do to implement a CLOUD or in a Virtualized Environment.

August 8, 2013

Wordless Wednesday — #Oracle, #12c, #STEM, #GEEK

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle 12c installed . Getting my #GEEK on this week.

 

Ora12c_Installed

August 7, 2013

Oracle v 12c … vs. Greenplum MPP — #STEM, #Oracle, #Greenplum, #BigData

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Studying up on Oracle v. 12c. As usual, there are many new features to recommend migrating or deploying to the new version of Oracle. Last blog, I talked about just a few: ILM, ADO, HEAT_MAP and how these buzz-worthy acronyms were related to compression inside the database. Before,  I get into today’s topic, I wanted to talk about  a bit more about the Automatic Data Optimization (ADO).

I failed to make clear yesterday, that the ADO, automatically relocates your cold data or compresses your data as it ages through its Lifecycle automatically. That is the magic. You define the policies and the database will relocate or compress a segment(s) or a row(s) to save space or to clear space on more expensive hard disk, by relocating to slower/less accessible disk storage media. Pretty nifty idea.

By the way, you may be wondering … 8i, 9i, 10g, 11g, 12c what is the pattern or meaning of these major release versions from Oracle.?  Well, “8i / 9i” were from the era, when Oracle was the “Internet” database (you know  like iPhone, or i-<Anything>). Then “10g / 11g” were to be the “Grid”. Grid never really achieved buzz-worthy status. Now we have “12c”. It should not surprise you that we are now in the “Cloud” era. So Oracle’s letters are for: Internet, Grid, and Cloud . Now you know.

That Cloud and yesterday’s ADO  will figure in today’s blog too. You see, I was recently asked about Greenplum. Could I use it? As is my wont, I took a step back and studied the question. Here is my answer.

GreenPlum

Oracle

MPP platform

MPP – RAC(aka Oracle parallel server)

Full SQL (Postgres)

Full SQL (Oracle, ANSI)

Compression

Compression since 11g, ADO/ILM 12c

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes

JDBC/ODBC/OLE

JDBC/ODBC/OLE/Pro*C (etc.)

Parallel Query Optimizer

Parallel Query Optimizer

External Tables

External Tables

GreenPlum HD (HDFS)

External Tables using an HDFS

I believe that as an Oracle expert (28+ years from v2.0-11g inclusive), that I could effectively use Greenplum on a project. If you look at the above chart, I think you will see what I am about to explain.

Green is an MPP platform. Very nice acrhitecture. Oracle can sit on top of any architecture (MPP, SMP, or any cluster or Highly Available or Fault-Tolerant Failover set of servers) you can setup.

Both use FULL SQL.  That means ANSI compliance and with enhancements (POSTGRES for Greenplum and ORACLE, uh, for Oracle).

B-Tree and Bit Map Indexes for both — yawn old hat. Parallel Query Optimizer – been there, seen that for a while.

Greenplum has JDBC/ODBC/OLE interfaces. Oracle has those too, plus a full complement of Pro*C (or many other languages) embedded pre-compiled 3GL languages. Oracle is well supported by Shell Scripts like PHP or PERL that have their interfaces to Oracle. Slight advantage to Oracle. But the point is, Oracle professionals have done this for more than a decade.

External Tables too are a feature in both databases.  GreenPlum HD uses the External Table to provide HDFS access in GreenPlum via SQL or other in-database features. Now I had not previously thought to try and use HDFS with Oracle. But the External Table is precisely the feature I would use. Can it be done? A look at Oracle’s documentation answers that:

LINK: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27101_01/doc.10/e27365/directhdfs.htm

CREATE TABLE [schema.]table
   ( column datatype, ... )
   ORGANIZATION EXTERNAL ( TYPE ORACLE_LOADER
                        DEFAULT DIRECTORY directory
                        ACCESS PARAMETERS
                            ( PREPROCESSOR HDFS_BIN_PATH:hdfs_stream access_parameters
                        ... )
                        LOCATION (file1,file2...)
                      );

CONCLUSION
So I recommend that companies fell free to utilize Oracle consultants on Greenplum databases. There is an awful lot of overlap that the Oracle specialist can leverage from his/her background and transfer to the Greenplum database.

Of course, for companies without Greenplum, it looks like you can use many of the same features already in Oracle including using HDFS filesystems with External Tables.

So get to that BigData, your friendly Oracle expert can help you.

August 6, 2013

This Jester Has Been Consulting the Oracle — #STEM, #ILM, #ADO, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 06 Aug 2013 — 

OracleLogo
If you are the same age as Stanczyk, then when you see the acronym, ILM, you probably think of George Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic. But this article is about the Oracle of Larry Ellison. Oracle has released its latest version of its database, 12c, on June 25th, 2013.

So the ILM, of this blog is about Information Lifecycle Management. I thought you might need a buzz-word upgrade too — hence this blog. In the latest 12c, Oracle is advancing its ILM paradigm to make Automatic Data Optimization (ADO) a differentiator in Data / Databases. You see data storage is eating the planet or at least the IT budgets of many large companies. That Big Data has to live somewhere and the costs to house that data is very significant. Ergo, Oracle is giving you a way to  Tier your data storage  amongst differing costs media (hi to low) and using differing levels of compression, depending on your data’s lifecycle. Hence ILM.

ILM_ora

Source:  Oracle Documentation

The idea is that data ages from very active, to less active, to historical, to archival. You ideally would want to place the most active data on the fastest, most reliable, … most costly hardware. Likewise, as the data ages, it would be preferable to place on less costly storage devices or in a more compressed state to save space and costs. How can you do that effectively and without a large staff of IT professionals?  This is where the ADO comes in.

Using your familiar create table or alter table commands you can add an ILM policy to compress or relocate your data. Oracle provides segment level or  even row level granularity for these policies. How do you know what data is active vs inactive? Oracle has implemented a HEAT_MAP facility for detecting data usage. HEAT_MAP is a db parameter. Set it on in your init.ora file or via an alter session command in sql*plus (to do it on a session basis instead of database wide.

 ALTER SESSION SET HEAT_MAP=ON;

You can check on things via:

 SELECT * FROM V$HEAT_MAP_SEGMENT;

There is even a PL_SQL stored package:  DBMS_HEAT_MAP.

So this is a quick update on ILM, ADO, and HEAT_MAP in Oracle 12c database. Go to the Oracle yourself and see what you can get on this new technology.

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July 28, 2013

FamilySearch.Org — #Genealogy, #STEM, #Database

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 22 Jul 2013 — FamilySearch.Org  New Database

FamilySearch.Org has some new databases (don’t they always — they are amazing). One in particular caught this jester’s eyes.

United States, National Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel Files, 1954-1970,

By training and long years in the field, Stanczyk is a STEM worker. So I was drawn to this database. But who did I know had a degree and was a professional in 1954-1970 ? How about one of my favorite authors … in a register of Science / Technical professional? Well, yes — if you thought of  Isaac Asimov .

So what data is in this database …

If click on the FamilySearch.org link, then query on Isaac Asimov, you will see:

Asimov

July 14, 2013

A Bit of Blog Bigos … #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy since the 4th of July! So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my blog.

bigos_huntersstewA bit of bigos (recipe) !!

Let me point out that in June the Polish Archive completed their latest update on: ♥ http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/ .

Unfortunately, it did not include anything from the old wojewodztwo: Kielce (now in SwietoKrzyskie). See the image of the drop down menu below (not full listing but to give you an idea on what is in and how that is somewhat limited for researchers like Stanczyk. I hope another phase will commence soon!

 

SzukajArchiwum_June

Meanwhile on:

♥  genealodzy.pl - They added the death records from 1875-1908 for Pacanow parish to their Geneszukach database. Previously they had added the Birth and Marriage records. These are transcription / indexes, not actual church record images such as you find in their Metryki database.

Still I have found dozens of Eliasz (and … Gawlik, Gronek, Hajek, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Major, Paluch, Wlecial, Zasucha, etc.) that I was previously unaware of. Now I will need to get the actual images in order to make sense of these indexes and the new people in order to add them to the family tree.

Enjoy the bigos. Smaczne (delicious)!

June 2, 2013

Polish Vital Records On-line — A Survey #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Metryka_Urodzenia_Births

Stanczyk is a bit uncertain. It seems like every day there are some new vital records indexes or even actual register scans themselves made available from congregations all over the Central European — Jewish, Catholic (Roman & Greek), Orthodox, Lutheran/Evangelical lands that make up Poland or a land that was once within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the 1st Republic) or any of the variations between those times. So I thought I would step back and take stock of what was available. Yes, I know this will be out of date by tomorrow. But here is a quick & dirty, handy reference list of where to go looking. Clip & Save.

Cut— — — — — — — — — —

Poland – Archives & Genealogical Societies

AGAD Księgi metrykalne – Eastern Borderlands (Ukraine, Russia Jewish Pale, etc.) —

http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/testy.html

(scans by Sygn.: http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/KMLw301.html#idp1765776 )

Prussian Poland Parishes

BASIA - http://www.basia.famula.pl/en/ - State Archives in Poznan, the Wielkopolska Genealogical Society (WTG “Gniazdo”) project.

Poznan Marriage Project - http://poznan-project.psnc.pl/

Pomorskie Towarzstwo Genealogiczne - http://www.ptg.gda.pl/

All Poland & Eastern Borders (PTG)

GeneSzukacz  / Geneteka (indexes, some scans) –  http://www.geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl/      &      http://geneteka.genealodzy.pl/

METRYKI (parish register scans)– http://metryki.genealodzy.pl/

Szukajwarchiwach (Poland’s National Archives online) - http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/

This is the latest project and is shooting to have 5.8 Million records by the end June (this month) scanned and on-line by Polish Archive or National Museum.

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) – http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

The venerable project with new life provides indexes to registered users (free) and then you can purchase the actual church record. Great for Jewish Pale & Russian Poland, plus so much more.

Metryk.GenBaza.pl - http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,4,1 (AP GRODZISK). Archive in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Russian Poland parishes near Warsaw).

Family Search.Org 

Besides the 5 parishes below, you might want to have a look at holdings for:

Austria, Germany, Russia & Ukraine

Poland, Częstochowa Roman Catholic Church Books, 1873-1948 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Gliwice Roman Catholic Church Books, 1599-1976 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Lublin Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 99,510 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 18,916 21 Apr 2013
Poland, Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books, 1612-1900 1,002,155 6 Jan 2012

Did I miss any? Email Me … Proszę !

Other (Inne)

http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php - from Valerie Warunek (PGSM). Database of Indexed church records (birth/urodzenia, marriage/malzenstwa,  death/zgony) from Lubelskie wojewodztwo. No scans (skans), but it does have record (akt) #’s.

May 21, 2013

Pacanow 1875-1908 Index

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St. Martin -  Pacanow Church about 1918

St. Martin – Pacanow Church about 1918

Stanczyk, has been sifting through the Index created on genealodzy.pl in their Geneszukacz database. Alright, only the Births Index, so far.

I see they have a total of nearly 7,300 people from those years (1875-1908) in their Birth Index. From Adam … Żyp . There were 58 ELIASZ in their index.Notice they used ELIASZ and not ELIJASZ. I found that interesting. They removed ‘J’ when they produced the index. Was that an error? Or was the indexer an expert? Because, in my heart of hearts, I believe the name (at least back to 1690) was ELIASZ.

It was only since 1869 when the Russian Empire forced Poland to keep records in Russian (Cyrillic) that the ‘J’ appeared from the Russian character ‘я’ (Ya) that ELIASZ became элияшъ .  элияшъ is transliterated in a Latin alphabet as ‘Elijasz’.

I only wanted to mention this as while I believe the translated properly produced the index with respect to ELIASZ; You will need to realize that finding the record in Russian/Cyrillic, you will need to look for a different translation (i.e. ELIJASZ/элияшъ) in the indexes and the actual church records.

So now I have an index of ELIASZ born in Pacanow in the years 1875-1908. Now what? I compared the list of 58 with what I already had/knew. I saw an overlap of 22 people. So I have 36 new ELIASZ to resolve and add into the family tree. My options are:

  1. Write to Pacanow parish and request specific records (since I have year, Akt#),  
  2. Write to Polish National Archive (again with detailed info),
  3. Hire a genealogist in Poland,
  4. Go on a genealogical tour to Poland.

The year range 1875-1908 is not completely in LDS microfilm. Although 1875-1884 is in LDS MF #’s:

1192351 Item 10,    1192352 Items 1-2,   1807621 Items 8-11,    1807622 Items 1-3

So doing research in a local Family History Center or at the Family History Library (Salt Lake) is not an option for the remaining 36. So I now have better options for remote research.

My List of 58 ELIASZ.

May 19, 2013

Genealodzy.pl – Geneszukacz Database, Pacanow 1875-1908 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Pacanow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealodzy_plOn http://genealodzy.pl/  Stanczyk  saw that they have an updated GENESZUKACZ database.

My ancestral village, PACANOW, was indexed for BIRTHS (1875-1908). I was able to verify it was correct with my grandfather (whose Birth Record I have) and a few others. I also found some I did not know about !!!   I only wish they had the images (like in METRYKI database). Thank you: Wojciech Liśkiewicz (who I think was the indexer)!

Later in the day they(he) also added MARRIAGES(1875-1908) too.

BIRTHS

MARRIAGES

See Also:

Domagala, Hajek, Kedzierski, Odomski, Paluch, Poniewierski, Siwiec, Wlecial, Wojtys, Zasucha, Zdziebko, Zwolski

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