Posts tagged ‘Alegata’

July 17, 2018

Alegata Stamps – #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


Link:

 

http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,detail,95466,26

From Stopnica parish, 1923 Alegata book

 

I think 5,000 Marks (Marek). Some stamps were tucked into page crease on the image. But, this is surely a record # of stamps (if not the actual amount).

 

Whoops I wrote too soon, the back of 2nd page was loaded with stamps (2nd picture on right), 32 more at 50 Marks each = 1,600. So that makes a grand total of 6,600 Marks!

 

I did find a 30,000 Mark alegata (thankfully s/he used 5,000 & 3,000 Mark stamps for that Marriage bann alegata.

 

 

 

 

 

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June 22, 2018

Alegata As TimeMachine – Part 4 — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wanted to give you a list of some typical and a couple atypical alegata that you might encounter through your research. This is a pictorial list to help you recognize what you are viewing.

The other three parts in this series: Part-1 , Part-2 , Part-3

Marriage

This is the typical marriage alegata. It repeats data in the actual marriage

record for this year. #BRAK

You need to look for Russian / Cyrillic that looks like the handwritten (cursive) version of:  брака

 

 

 


Death

This is the typical death alegata. Its proves the participant is widowed and thus eligible for remarriage in the church.  #CMERT

 

 

 

You need to look for Russian / Cyrillic that looks like the handwritten (cursive) version of:  смерт

 


Birth - Dual Language Side by Side

This is a birth alegata. It proves the participant was baptised in a remote parish. This one has birth record in both Polish (right side) and Russian (left side)! This can be helpful if you read both languages in case one side is hard to read.

You need to look for Russian / Cyrillic that looks like the handwritten (cursive) version of:  роджение

 


Birth - Polish
In the upper left corner you will often see the administrative heirarchy written. In this example,  we see…

Келецкая   гыберния

Сторницкий   Уездъ
Пруходъ   Солецъ
Which in this case means:
Kieleckie Gubernia
Stopnica Uezd
Parafia Solec
It will be different in your case, depending on where you are researching and what you find. Notice the birth record is written in Polish (1848 year record in 1878 Alegata).

This another birth example. Be sure to record  the village (Oblekon) The Akt#(record#, in this case 24), the parish (Swiniary), and the year (chopped of in the image 18×7). Since the language is Polish you know its 1867 or 1857 or 1847, …

 

 

 

 

 

 



Galicia Birth

  1. These next two pictures illustrate alegata between two empires. Yes marriages happened across the border between the Russian Empire and The Austrian Empire (Galicia Kingdom). It was somewhat common along the Vistula river border separating these empires that were occupying a partitioned Poland (no longer shown upon European maps).

 

 

 


 


  1. Pay close attention to this alegata type. It is again across empires. It is not the Latin Box form that the prior example was. This a paragraph form. So the language is neither Polish nor Russian. It is in fact written in Latin.

Notices you have a Russian stamp and an Austrian stamp! This shows that both empires were collecting their fees on these cross-empire marriages.

Another useful piece of information to take note of, is that this document has the civil administrative hierarchy on the top left and then you see the religious hierarchy (Diocese, Deaconate/Deanery, Parish) across the top right.,/p>

It is important to know both the civil and the religious heirarchy. You may need to search in civil archives (AP). You may also need to search in religious archives (AD) for copies. In Poland (as in most nations with Catholic dioceses), you will find that duplicate copies were usually (sometimes, but always) made and kept in the diocessan curia. SO this may help you if records were destroyed, as is soft often the case in the border lands between empires (or future nations formed after wars).

 

 

 


This alegata uses a modern form from 1987 for a birth in 1904. Located in a parish alegata book from 1904 (a request from the future)!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This alegata request is from 1939 for a 1904 birth. These may be invaluable as they appear right before WW2. The alegata that preceded wars may act to preserve potentially lost records from elsewhere! Notice how the forms change over time. Alegata after 1918 are all in Polish (unless they come from outside Poland).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



A rare alegata from a court that is a name change request. Leon Pieszczochowicz probably used the name change as a part of his passport / ship ticket process. Thus he had to correct the church birth record.

June 9, 2018

Part 3 of Alegata As Time Machine — #Polish #Genealogy #Russian-Poland #Partition #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Biechow 1878 Alegata - Page 12 of Alegata for Marriage 15Stanczyk, welcomes you to the third part of this multi-part Alegata As Time Machine series. As the title suggests this is the third part.

Parts 1 & 2 can be reviewed below:

  1. Alegata As Time Machine — I
  2. Alegata As Time Machine — II

There have been some prior alegata articles (in case you are binging):

  1. 1878 Marriage – Russian Empire bride + Austrian Empire groom
  2. Another Alegata Article
  3. Clever Use Of Alegata

Today’s article is we are going to dissect a typical article and see what we can expect to find. In the fourth part we will look at many sample portions to see the type we might encounter.

First off, be aware that you can click on the images to see larger version of the images to see the fine details. Second, let me remind you, dear reader, that alegata are mostly found in Russian Poland partition but the general knowledge still holds, though the year and the partition may dictate a different language. In this series we will see Russian/Cyrillic, Polish (Latin alphabet), and Latin (the actual language) among the samples. In fact, you may see more than one language in an alegata.

1878 Alegata dissectedToday’s alegata is about the bride who was born outside the parish who is now living in the local parish (Biechów). So the bride is proving she was baptised to marry in the local church.

Let’s look at the various pieces and derive their meaning in this common sample.

Number (1) — It is in Russian. Its meaning is, “Record (akt) # 121, RZEGOCIN”. This margin note ties the data back the Ostrowce parish (in Kielce gubernia, Grotniki gmina). We will see the event type and the year of the remote record in a bit.

Number (2) — Do you see the light, pencilled, “12”? That is what the second bullet pertains to. This “12” indicates we are on the 12th page of alegata. The left side of the image is page 11 and the right side is page 12. The left side, is usually, the back of the prior page’s text.

Number (3) — The top header text, relatively bold in ink is Russian text indicating this is an alegata for an 1878 marriage, the akt #, in the local parish’s 1878 marriages. For the record we are looking Biechow parish (Kielce gubernia, Stopnica gmina), 1878 Alegata book on page 12 (this image).

Number (4) — The fourth part, we are calling out is the record # (akt #) that this alegata is for. In this case it is for Marriage Akt 15, in Biechow parish Marriages.

Number (5) — The fifth bullet is the top of the remote record. It indicates the event type from the remote parish that this alegata page is about. In this case we are looking at a birth record. In Russian/Cyrillic, “рождение” (birth).

Number (6) — The final bullet, (6), is about the birth record (in Polish) and more specifically, the year of that record, which in this case is 1861. Now this is fortuitous because, the online births end at 1859. So for birth years 1860 and forward you would normally have to write to the parish (Ostrowce, św.Jana Chrzciciela) to get this birth record.  At the bottom of the record is the date:

Ostrowce, 4/16th day of August, 1878 (the date this record was extracted from that remote parish’s books).

One final note. Did you notice that the birth was written in Polish (not Russian)? If the remote event record was before 1868 then it will be in Polish. Galicia records are in Latin.

To see the Alegata side-by-side with the Marriage record click on “Continue reading”

read more »

June 4, 2018

Alegata As Time Machine — Part 2

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

I wanted to show the availability of alegata in parishes that were in or nearby my ancestral parishes. So the table below shows how common (or rare) alegata are.  They seem to range from about 1813 (before Napoleon’s final defeat, and the subsequent formation of Congress Poland / Russian-Empire Polish partition). The 1813 I saw was in Polaniec (and is not shown in the table below). The latest as we see in the table below is 1923. There may be more after that year but perhaps privacy rules prevent their being published until later. So we have about 110 year range to view alegata.

The time machine aspect comes into play because the alegata are recorded in the year they are for. The actual request may have been in 1989 and the earliest year for which the alegata gets data is 1720. So the time machine spans 269 years while the alegata only cover 110 years. So we are gaining 100 years on the early side and 66 years on the later side. While this time span is not complete (i.e. not everybody’s data is shown, it is extraordinarily helpful to those whose ancestor does have an alegata in reference to. Hence, why I call it a time machine. We might see a request from the 1950’s for a record in late 1800’s in an alegata book dated 1901. In some cases (particularly the earlier years), we may find a record that was subsequently lost, but due to an alegata request, it was saved in duplicate and thus preserved for some lucky genealogist even though the original book may have been lost/stolen/burned.

Parish Alegata Available (nearby parishes)

Parish Year Range Parish Year Range
Biechow 1875 — 1882 Opatowiec 1887
Biechow 1884 — 1893 Pacanow 1875 — 1897
Biechow 1895 Pacanow 1899 — 1905
Biechow 1897 — 1901 Pacanow 1907 — 1908
Biechow 1904 — 1908 Stopnica 1875 — 1878
Busko 1912 Stopnica 1887
Busko 1914 Stopnica 1889 — 1892
Busko 1916 Stopnica 1894 — 1897
Dobrowoda 1875 — 1894 Stopnica 1901 — 1903
Dobrowoda 1896 — 1898 Stopnica 1905 — 1906
Dobrowoda 1901 Stopnica 1909
Dobrowoda 1903 — 1914 Stopnica 1913
Olesnica 1875 — 1890 Stopnica 1923
Olesnica 1892 — 1913 Szczebrzusz 1875
Opatowiec 1823 Szczebrzusz 1877 — 1891
Opatowiec 1826 — 1830 Szczebrzusz 1894
Opatowiec 1832 — 1834 Szczebrzusz 1896 — 1900
Opatowiec 1839 — 1844 Szczebrzusz 1903
Opatowiec 1872 Zborowek 1875 — 1887
Opatowiec 1875 — 1879 Zborowek 1889 — 1895
Opatowiec 1881 — 1885 Zborowek 1897 — 1908

At present, I am compiling a spreadsheet from the alegata in the above table. I’ll probably publish an analysis of my findings. In some article after the findings, I may write an article on the stamps seen in an alegata and what their purpose was. But right now I wanted to answer again why is there an alegata.

Why an alegata?

The reasons are more varied then I had originally assumed. Here are some reasons, you will find an alegata:

  1. The groom (mostly) or the bride or perhaps both were born in another, remote parish.
  2. The bride or the groom  (or both) were widowed.
  3. The wife is notified in a letter(s) that her husband has died in military service and is now a widow.
  4. The far flung future requests a church record from the past.
  5. The future provides a court document of a vital record change or asks for information on an individual(s).
  6. A remote parish or USC notifies an original parish of a death or a marriage (see #1).

There may be other reasons too. But at any rate, if you see a marriage in your parish books and (you see the groom is from an outside parish or the bride was born elsewhere, then you should look to see if there exists an alegata. The alegata will provide additional data substantiating the marriage can take place.

I once found an alegata about an ancestor when there was only alegata online (typically not indexed). It had info about a marriage that was yet to be published online. Further more, both the groom and bride were widowed and hence I was also provided with death data on the prior spouses.  The marriage and the alegata taken together can provide you a means to track down your migrating ancestors and where they came from or where they moved to.

Also, please note, that as of the present (4-June-2018), no Alegata have been indexed. So that data is a complete mystery. So who knows what treasures you might find, just by doing an exhaustive search through alegata.

Next time, a sample of what alegata look like, so you know what you are seeing. It can be confusing due to the multitude of time eras involved (seeing multiple languages) or you may see many differing forms due to the various timeframes involved. We’ll break it down in a rather lengthy blog article with pictures and descriptions.

read more »

May 17, 2018

Alegata Are Genealogy Time Machines — #Genealogy #Polish #ChurchRecords

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Early Alegata: 1823, 1826, 1827…

       Opatowiec Parish in Kielce Gubernia

Stanczyk loves alegata. Let’s see you have Birth (urodzony/chrzest), Marriage (małżeństwo/słuby, zapiowiedzi), Alegata, Death (Zgony/Śmierci). The cycle of life via church records (sacrements). Reading alegata are very interesting indeed. Sometimes its like gossip… “Do you know who is getting married here?” Other times its solemn, like the death of a soldier. But it is a time machine of sorts, that allows you to see backward and on rare occasions forward. It is this time machine capability that may help you locate missing records.

What are Alegata?

Alegat is a Polish word of Latin origin, from allegatio, “sending someone as an intermediary; a citation of proof; a submitted document.”

It is not only an interesting relic of phraseology from ecclesiastical language, it provides great potential genealogical documents of significance. This word, seemingly forgotten and archaic, is currently undergoing a rebirth, precisely because of genealogy. Many beginning researchers do not know about the existence and meaning of these documents. Alegata is the plural of Alegat. Sometimes they are found at the end of church books as loose pages. When they are found in their own books, they are called Alegata or Aneksy. They are most common in the former Russian-Poland partition. As is shown in the picture (by red arrows) they date to just after the Napoleonic Era.

What were Alegata Used For?

These are Polish Church documents to establish an eligibility for a church sacrament. Most often they are used for marriages. Their purpose is often to document a death and thus making the widow/widower eligible to remarry in the church. Sometimes its used where the groom (most often) if from a remote/foreign parish is a baptised Catholic. I have seen a few other purposes: name change, soldier’s death, etc. Often the inquiries in later years are from courts or remote Polish parishes and are forms.  However, for the genealogist, they can fill in the gap for a missing church record. Often because of the marriage aspect, they can help you (the genealogist) track movements of your ancestors across parishes. In the coming articles, we’ll look at a few examples.

March 7, 2014

Another Alegata Article — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian, #Cyrillic

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19070124_Alegata_Marr_Elijasz_Leszczynski copy

75 kopeks. The cost of that stamp on an alegata. In case, you cannot read Cyrillic or do not recognize it on the cancellation mark of the stamp — it says:

11/24 January 1907

This stamp appeared on an alegata document, describing my paternal grandparents, Jozef Elijasz & Waleryja Leszczynska. You can see from the civil and church records of theirs, that this is their marriage date.

So now I have three Polish  authoritative sources for their marriage (date/place).

I found this alegata a bit fascinating. First it had the stamp. Second it listed my grandfather & his parents, but only my grandmother (without her parents  — fortunately, the other two records listed those parents). Third and most puzzling is the marriage bann dates:

13th, 20th, 27th January [of 1907 implied]. But wait a minute, the date of the alegata is 11/24 January, 1907. That is three days before their marriage date. So this “official document” had listed a future date [of the marriage], I guess giving them permission to marry in the church assuming the 3rd bann was a foregone conclusion. The future date so messed with my mind and comprehension of Russian/Cyrillic that I had to check and recheck the three documents to assure myself I was reading it correctly and that they had used a future date in the alegata!

Oh, the 11/24 January 1907 thing?  That is just the custom of “dual dating”. The earlier date is the Julian date: 11-January-1907, as the Russian calendar was still using the Julian calendar. While the 24-January-1907 is the Gregorian calendar that we use today. Of course you can find liturgical calendars (Russian Orthodox for example) that still use the Julian Calendar for their religious events (i.e. EASTER). Why is it 13 days difference?  They were in the 20th century and another day difference between the two calendars, as compared to the majority of the church records (1868-1900 during when the Russian language  was the defacto language of administration records) in the Russian partition which were 12 days apart.

— — —  Alegata …

read more »

February 26, 2014

Wordless Wednesday – Ludwik Elijasz Family View

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

A couple of days ago Stanczyk published a tip for using Alegata online images to supplement/replace having a marriage record. So here is the genealogy record for Ludwik Elijasz (and his two wives, siblings and parents). Where’s Maryanna Wierzbocka? She is Maryanna Przylucka (Wierzbocka) Elijasz. :

Ludwik Elijasz

December 6, 2009

2009 Genealogy Treasure Finds

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been silent for far too long. Most of my silence is due to my Mac dying and a bad economy dictating that I cannot replace it right now. Lest you feel sorry for this jester, my other reason has been my job. I have been busy working and since August working on an important project vital to my company’s success. So I’ll thank the Lord for my job and the ability to take care of my wife and dog (Princess Java Argus Solomon Eliasz). I’ll get around to registering her with the AKC one of these days. I am thankful for JAVA  and TEREZA.

I am also thankful for a wonderful year in genealogy. I can look back and see how luck I was to find a kind soul in Biechow (Elzbieta) who mailed me my grandparent’s marriage record from the church and from the local USC.

I am thankful to Ann Faulkner of Michigan who was able to dig out my great-uncle Jan Eliasz/Elijasz and his death notice. From which I was able to get his death certificate. Next time back home to family, I will pay a visit to my great-uncle’s grave.

Those were huge! I am also thankful for meeting Jacek of Krakow. I met him in a Polish web site: genealodzy.pl. We swapped some images since our families were from the same villages (Biechow, Pacanow, Zborowek amongst others) and some laughs (due to my lack of proficiency with the Polish language). He also worked for me at the Pinczow Archive to research: Eliasz, Leszczynski & Wlecialowski.  It is to Jacek, that I am most thankful. He found my grandfather’s birth record ( and many of his siblings), he found an uncle we never knew about (but suspected must exist), he found Leszczynski and many Wlecialowski too. I am particularly grateful he found an Eliasz-Wlecialowski marriage record that solved a problem about how the Eliasz were related to Wlecialowski. In so doing he made a genealogical friend of mine, a third cousin! I am most thankful to Jacek fo rhis finding the marriage churhc record of my great-grandparents: Tomasz Leszczynski & Aniela Major (yes this is a Polish name). He also found three pages of alegata describing the marriage banns — believe when I have a MAC again, I will post pictures. This must have been a pre-cursor to a marriage license — it has a postage stamp on the top of the 1st page! It was from 1885, so the pre-amble and the final summation are in Russian/Cyrillic, but the middle was in Polish  — and I was able to read and understand it; Much good info there.

So all-in-all, I’d have to say that 2009 was an unparalleled year for genealogy.  How did your genealogy search go this year?

–Stanczyk

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