Archive for ‘Musings’

May 27, 2015

American Pharoah

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

AmericanPharoahLineageLast year California Chrome missed winning the triple crown by finishing 4th in the Belmont (to TONALIST).. Once again, all across the land people are rooting for history. On 6-June-2015, American Pharoah could make history  as the thoroughbred by winning the Triple Crown (Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and Belmont Stakes prize races). The  colt missed out being the  twelfth  Triple Crown winner in horse racing history. The previous Triple Crown winner was Affirmed, 37 years ago !

So Stanczyk being a genealogist was wondering what is American Pharoah’s family tree. To answer that question, you can query a pedigree database (http://www.pedigreequery.com/american+pharoah). It should be no surprise that this colt is a champion winning two of three legs of the Crown. His 3x great-grandfather was Secretariat.  Good Stock. Speaking of good stock, American Pharoah’s  breeding rights to Coolmore in America. The terms have not been disclosed but it is believed to be much more than $20 Million and if you can project from Affirmed, probably more than $40 Million. Imagine what American Pharoah will be worth if he is the Triple Crown winner !

 

Previous 11 US Triple Crown Winners

YEAR WINNER JOCKEY TRAINER
1919 Sir Barton Johnny Loftus H. Guy Bedwell
1930 Gallant Fox Earl Sande Jim Fitzsimmons
1935 Omaha Willie Saunders Jim Fitzsimmons
1937 War Admiral Charley Kurtsinger George H. Conway
1941 Whirlaway Eddie Arcaro Ben A. Jones
1943 Count Fleet Johnny Longden Don Cameron
1946 Assault Warren Mehrtens Max Hirsch
1948 Citation Eddie Arcaro Horace A. Jones
1973 Secretariat Ron Turcotte Lucien Laurin
1977 Seattle Slew Jean Cruguet William H. Turner, Jr.
1978 Affirmed Steve Cauthen Laz Barrera

 

 


 

May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


 

Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:

Pacanow_16thCentury_Boundaries

The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.

Toolbar

For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.


May 16, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland — #Genealogy #Polish #History #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was combing through genealodzy.pl  (aka PTG). In their discussions they mentioned a new website with an interactive map of Poland from the 16th century. That was excellent and I will discuss it this blog article and continue in the next with examples. But I decided to see what else the website had and that is how this jester go to:

Atlas of Sources and Materials for History of Old Poland

If you see the polish language version, merely click on the British flag to see English language. This site has seven assets worth perusing and examining in depth, including the interactive map of the Polish Kingdom in the 16th century (16w).

  1. Polish Territories of the Crown in the 16th century.  Spatial Database
  2. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Kalisz in the 16th Century
  3. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Poznań in the 16th Century
  4. Religions and Confessions in the Polish Crown in the 2nd half of the 18th Century
  5. The Court Records of Wschowa, 1495-1526
  6. Register of Protestant communities in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
    in the 16th-18th centuries
  7. Parish libraries of Wiślica praeposite in the second half of the 18th century

 

This blog is primarily about Kielce wojewodztwo (or gubernia) and some surrounding areas too. So while I dutifully inform my readers who are interested in other Polish Genealogical matters or Geographical area that there are Tax Registers for  KALISZ or POZNAN. There are also a statistical record of ALL religions in the Polish Kingdom of the 18th century (very useful for classifying your ancestral parish’s congregation or identifying a synagogue location). Likewise, the register of PROTESTANT congregations in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth for 16th-18th centuries (16w-18w). This jester did not investigate the court records … yet. Lastly,  the parish libraries of Wislica is heavy Latin lifting, so while I did peruse and find some possible future gems, I will skip this too. So I will return to the 1st item in the list, the interactive map which is a treasure for all wojewodztwa (provinces/states/voivodes).

 

Here is the link (using English, clicking above link will lead to an intermediate set of choices which uses Polish map):

http://hgisb.kul.lublin.pl/azm/pmapper-4.2.0/map_default.phtml?resetsession=ALL&config=korona&language=en

You should see:

AllPoland_16w

 

Let’s type ‘Pacanów’ (no quotes, and diacriticals are needed). Since it is inconvenient to enter diacriticals, you can start typing and let the software, autocomplete for you (thus supplying the necessary diacritical). Keep in mind that this what Poland looked like in the 16th century! So that is why you see Wislica ‘District’ and the Sandomierz wojewodztwo in the pop-up box — which you should promptly close . Next we need to zoom as, all you can see is the blue-green box that represents Pacanów (not the actual text). So in the lower left of your screen is the zoom tool. Click on plus 2-3 times or drag the little slider arrow or you can do as I did and enter ‘100000’ (no quotes) into Scale field at the bottom.

You should see:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now you notice villages with green boxes (ex. Solec, Swiniary, Biechow, etc.). These are parishes that existed in the 16th century.

— — — — — — Diacritcals to Use:

ą Ćć ę Łł ń ó Śś Źź Żż

 

Next time we will examine the map further.


 

May 2, 2015

The The British Royal Succession — #Royalty #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Monarch Wait Time, Reign Time by Century

The British Royal Succession — #Royalty #Genealogy

Duke/Duchess Cambridge had a 2nd child this morning, an 8 lb. baby daughter. No name yet. 

The blessed queen now has quite a large retinue of heirs (roughly two dozen). Click on the link above for the Royal Succession chart (source USA Today).

🃏 — Stanczyk is hoping for: “Aleksandra Diana  Wiktoria” for the spare heir’s name.

Let’s the sports bettors collect their date winnings whilst the bets on names hangs in the balance for a few more days!

April 16, 2015

Holocaust Remembrance Day – 70th Anniversary

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

Yad Vashem

 Today … a little over an hour ago, Israel commemorated the Holocaust. At sundown last night and beginning  with sunrise, the Israelis remember. They remember so that it, The Holocaust, will never happen again. If you were in Israel you would see at 10:00am local time, a siren sounds and that everything comes to a stop. Pedestrians stop walking. Cars halt … people get out of their cars (some) and it is silent. Last evening  … candles & lights. Today, silence and commemorative events.

#Remember what happens when a people ignore the rights and dehumanize a small segment of their own society. In the 2oth Century it was the Nazis. Today,  who are engaging in similar atrocities?

If you have eyes to see, then you know who. Remember. We should all remember!

April 7, 2015

Genealogy Collaboration — #Genealogy #Collaboration #Facebook

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is BIG on collaboration on genealogical research. So, let me start by thanking Donna Keicher (FB) genealogist, Western NY Genealogical Society member, etc. Thank you Donna!

Donna was going to Buffalo & Eric County Public Library (BECPL) and she graciously agreed to donate some of her research time at BECPL to helping others from outside the area in their Western NY research. Stanczyk loves RAOGK (receiving and giving) as a collaborative pursuit. The BECPL is on my wish list (again) this year to visit and do some research in. Any way, Donna was able to get me a complete death date for Frank/Franciszek Leszczynski and she sent me an image from the Buffalo Evening News newspaper from 25-JUNE-1943.

Stanczyk also did a RAOGK for another researcher by visiting Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery (Devon, PA). It was for a James Davis (1784-1852) and was through, Find-A-Grave. I took a shot of his tombstone. While there, I also did some shots that added to memorials that were missing pictures and added a few new memorials (18th century) that were missing from Great Valley Baptist Church Cemetery on Find-A-Grave. I noticed an interesting tombstone (Phyllis Burr) who had a bit of a story about her slavery past. I learned a bit about Philadelphia’s abolitionists and the US Warship Ganges that rescued over 100 people from slavery (to indentured servitude/apprenticeship). Along the way, my social wife, spoke with the pastor John Loring (of The  Baptist Church in the Great Valley). The good pastor had some materials that he mailed, to this jester, about his historical cemetery and its occupants. Thank you Pastor John Loring.

Now this jester would like to hasten to add that he has done a lot of contributions to genealogy at Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz ‘s FB Group, Polish Genealogy. In particular, I like to help people with their translations or even  just reading the handwriting in their research finds from Poland. I also like to help genealogists in the group locate their ancestral parishes in Gazetteers or on current/historical  maps. Everyone is always sharing expertise,  tools or web sites to aid each other in furthering their genealogical research — this jester gets a kick out of brushing shoulders with the many talented/knowledgeable people the world over.

Let me conclude today’s blog by mentioning that ALL links today are to Facebook pages. The people & pages on Facebook have grown into a tremendous collaboration opportunity and also a learning tool as well.

March 25, 2015

#Muse Ted Cruz #2016Rhymes

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

IDoLikeACA_SamIAm#Muse Ted Cruz #2016Rhymes

#Muse

‪#‎2016Rhymes‬ The news makes me wax poetic …

I REALLY do like Green Egg and Hams
As do most all us Cuban-Can-Ams
You know to my family I am fair
So I’m signing up for ObamaCare
I, like Millions others now can
And it is the law of this Am-lan’
You know I shut down this gov
It REALLY is because I love
My family’s Canadian Moose
And Rhymes by Dr Seuss

‪#‎TedCruz‬


Tags: ,
March 22, 2015

530 Years After Death, Richard III Reburied

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

530 years after death, Richard III honored before reburial

Richard III finally is buried 22-MARCH-2015 in a marked grave.

Update your family trees Anglo Genealogists. 

 #AccuracyInGenealogy

Tags: ,
March 12, 2015

Techno#Genea™ – A New Meme For 2015 — #Genealogy #Geneteka

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Geneteka_20150312Stanczyk,

Needs a new meme. Hence “Techno#Genea” .    I am putting my hashtags to work inside and not necessarily at the beginning. Software will just have to catch up.

Techno#Genea is my meme to talk about technology + genealogy – just lose the “logy”.

Today’s Techno#Genea is on G E N E T E K A .  Geneteka added a new and I think very useful feature. Between the search fields and Search (Wyszukaj) button and the rows of data (i.e. result-set) are two lines:

‘Parafie w promieniu 15km:’ (Parishes within a 15km radius) of the parish you were searching within [in my case,  Biechow] and ‘Lata: ‘ (Years). In the case of the parishes, it gave me six: Beszowa, Oleśnica, Pacanów, Stopnica, Szczebrzusz, Zborówek. These are actually clickable too. You can start by searching all places, in my case you’d find 3 pages of ELIASZ (155 results) in the result set of BIRTHS. So to limit what I am looking at, I can go back to the Ksiega field and select from the drop down menu, “Biechow (pow. buski) – (U) 1810-1820” to look at just the Births (U) for Biechow and I get a much smaller result-set of just 9 records. But look at the two new lines!  I can click on PACANOW link and the result set changes to 58 (across 2 pages) births in Pacanow. This is #AWESOME ! Now you can do proximity searches, just by clicking on links of parish names. It also helps to teach you a bit of geography nearby to your ancestral village/parish.

Now just a word to the wise. This is only for records that have been indexed. It is not ALL records available and not all parishes are shown (just those with indexed records). So in the case of Biechow, you will not see Swiniary [today] as one of the parishes within the 15km radius even though it is only about 2-3km. This is because Geneteka has not indexed any records in Swiniary. So you can do proximity searches and see if there are any records in the surrounding parishes for your family name. Pretty cool feature for the tech-experts at: genealodzy.pl .

That’s my meme – Techno#Genea ™ and I am sticking to it.

March 10, 2015

Marie Curie: A Gift of Radium — #Polish #American #History #LOC

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Marie Curie: A Gift of Radium — #Polish #American #History #LOC

Madame Curie nee Skladowska two time Nobel Prize winner in two fields. the only woman to do so and only Linus Pauling accomplished this feat for the men. 

 #STEM

Reblogged from The Library of Congress

March 5, 2015

The Sad Saga of the Tsarnaevs … Final Chapter

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Catch-up by reading Stanczyk’s curated Flipboard magazine:

http://flip.it/pHHoa

#DzokharTsarnaev

#джохарцарнаев

February 17, 2015

Citizen, Soldier, Ancestor in Pictures – Wordless Wednesday #Meme

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

EdwardJozefPieszczochowicz_Arrival

Arrival 1910

Edward Jozef Pieszczochowicz WWI

WWI Draft 1917

Edward Jozef Pieszczochowicz Natl

Pet. Natl. Granted 1918

Edward Joseph Pieszczochowicz

Born: 16-OCT-1892, Stopnica, Kieleckie Gubernia, Poland (Russian-Poland partition); Akt #268 in Stopnica 1892 Births

Arrival: 28 May 1910,  Age: 17; from his father Leon Pieszczohowicz in Busko, Kielce to his uncle Jan Pieszczohowicz in West Seneca, NJ on SS Kroonland

WWI Draft: 1917

Petition For Naturalization (Granted): 2-October-1918

Discharged From Military Duty: 21-December-1918

Edward gets his citizenship while he is still in the Army (Camp Zachary Taylor, KY)! Notice he did not need to file a Declaration Of Intent – another benefit of serving in the military.

EdwardJozefPieszczochowicz_WWI_Service

World War I – Service Record


February 17, 2015

Citizen, Soldier, Ancestor — #Genealogy #Military #Citizenship

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Immigrant War Service Early 20th Century

We are an immigrant nation and multicultural, diverse melting pot of people. So from the beginning we controlled the process of who is a citizen with full rights that accrue from being an American.

Citizenship & Naturalization 

http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12.html

Somewhere along the way, the USA developed a tradition of rewarding service in the defense of this nation with easy citizenship. So after almost every war, we amended our laws to allow the citizen-soldier a fast track to citizenship.

Military Naturalization

http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-ntz-military.htm

 

Next … Losing Your Citizenship.

January 27, 2015

Holocaust Remembrance Day — 70th Anniversary

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

2015/01/img_0735.pngToday is the 70th Anniversary of the Anniversary when the survivors were freed from Nazi extermination camps around Europe. It is also the 27th Holocaust Remembrance day too [they coincide intentionally].

With the IS genocide and other crimes against humanity being performed by them and other terrorist organizations around the globe, it makes today more solemn, more imbued with God’s grace  than usual. Remember WWII ‘s horrors and strive to prevent these terrors ever again to honor that sacrifice of innocents from WWII.

 

— Stanczyk [for my wife & family]


 

January 25, 2015

Resources For Albanians in Southern Italy #Genealogy — #Albania

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Calabria Region

Calabria Region

In my wife’s family tree we have two branches of Albano-Italians (Arbëresh):

Augustine = D’Agostino (in Italy and early ship manifests)

They come from, Carsoli, in Aquila (Province), Abruzzo (region) of Italy  [eastwards from Rome]

The Di Lazzaro, Todaro branches going backwards from my wife’s great-grandmother are from:

Castroregio (commune), subdivision of Castrovillari, in Cosenza (Province), Calabria (region) of Southern Italy

Castroregio =  Kastërnexhi (Albanian)

Both branches appear to be Albanians (Arbëresh) and were founding families from 15th century migration from Albania to the remote Italian states of the Southern of Italy and even a few in Sicily too. These were from the Princes of Albania and their retinue and warriors.

Resources:

Castroregio is online in FamilySearch.org –

Italy, Cosenza, Castrovil…on (Tribunale), 1866-1910-> Cosenza-> Castroregio

Its State Archive (in Castrolvillari branch office of Cosenza) – Contact / Research Info —

http://www.archiviodistatocosenza.beniculturali.it/index.php?en/130/sezione-di-castrovillari

This had no online record images as other Italian State Archives did .

Carsoli – In Antenati –

http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/v/Archivio+di+Stato+di+LAquila/Stato+civile+italiano/Carsoli/

Inventory of State (Italy) Archives Online –

http://www.archivi-sias.it/consulta_inventari.asp?ResetFilter=Y&OnLine=1

Twenty-Six State Archives in Antenati with > 26 Million images Online –

http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/?q=gallery


Castroregio_4

Castroregio_1

Castroregio_2

Castroregio_3

January 23, 2015

Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro Augustine — #Genealogy of Albano-Italians

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

18710613_Birth13_MariaGiuseppeDiLazzaro_page1

page 1 of Birth Record 13

This week Stanczyk ventured far afield to … Castroregio. Where?

Exactly, I did not know where. My wife’s Great Grandmother, Mary Augustine was a Muslim !!! An Albanian Muslim. But when I started trying to find “Castorregio” [sic] from an USA record, I kept being shuttled off to Castroregio … Italy???

It turns out that the commune/settlement of Castroregio a part of Castrovillari in the Costenza Province in the region of Calabria, Italy. It is southern Italy up the pennisula north of the heel of the boot. It is also across the Adriatic Sea from Albania.

Ok, I accepted that fact. Now did FamilySearch.org have any online records/images of it? Yes. Their title:

Italy, Cosenza, Castroville. (Tribunale), 1866-1910URL:

Birth Record #13 — Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

I knew her father’s name was Diomede and that her birth date should be: 13 Jun 1871. These were from US records.

I had Mary Dellazarro for  name. The birth record said in the margin: Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

OK, so Mary was Maria and Maria’s middle name was Giuseppe. I was in the Civil Records for Castroregio in 1871. The final di Diomede was who her father was (his first name). Ok that was very good too. Diomede was not a common name. But how could I possibly know this was my Mary Dellalazzaro Augustine? The baby’s birth date was 13 Jun 1871 .  OK I was now certain I had the birth record of my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother. The birth date was an exact match from US records! This happens so seldom among my immigrant ancestors. It is usually a few days one way or another.

So now I had my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother, Mary’s birth record from Italy. It was in the civil records and the religion was listed as unknown/none-followed (not Muslim, but I could accept that might not be a popular label). But these were Italians or so I thought. After all these were records from Calabria, Italy. Perhaps they had migrated from Albania at some point, but when?

I also had my wife’s 2x great-grandparent’s names: Diomede Di Lazzaro of course. But I also had Mary Todaro too. I’ll save the suspense for another time. I found Diomede & Mary ‘s marriage record too. So I had another generation’s names (3x great grandparents on both Di Lazzaro & Todaro sides). The marriage record also gave me the full birth date of both newlyweds too! Bonus. I like Italian records – more info than my usual Russian-Poland records.

How was I able to read the records? It was not quite the same as Latin (which I knew well enough from Poland). I also was a bit let down by my Hoffman & Shea book, “Following The Paper Trail“. The book did not have a sample of Italian paragraph form. Thankfully, I can read old handwriting pretty well and Google’s translator worked well too and I was reading Italian. The form was very similar to the Napoleon Codex form I was used to from the Russian-Poland records I routinely deal with.

Finally, Google found me several web sites that described the Albanian migration to Italy which was actually a reward to the Albanian hero-king, Skanderbeg! These people were Albanians and they still communicated in their language and even today you may see signs in two languages (Albanian & Italian) for the place names in this region. I also found a Lazzaro in Berat, Albania. It turns out that the TODARO family was in the retinue of the original Albanian Soldiers of Skanderbeg. They were one of forty families that had migrated from Albania about  400 years earlier! Many of these families were Christians too. It turns out they were Eastern Rite Catholics (Orthodox Catholics) due to their connection  Byzantium and Constantinople. Skanderbeg was Orthodox Catholic, then Muslim then converted back to Orthodox Catholic again – so  being Muslim or Catholic was not a problem for these Albanians. They were ALBANIAN (Arbëresh) and that and their connection to Skanderbeg was what mattered to them!

January 22, 2015

King Abdullah Has Passed — Crown Prince Salman Is King !

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

2015/01/img_0705.png

Crown Prince Salman is now King of Saudi Arabia!

King Abdullah died 22-January-2015 was born 1924 and had been the reigning monarch since 2005 when he replaced King Fahd.

King Salman takes over at a critical juncture; May God Bless his efforts.

January 22, 2015

Genealogy & Stamps ; Miscellanea In The Records — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

1870 Stamp in Civil Record Books for Castroregio, Italy

1870 Stamp in Civil Records

Stanczyk loves genealogy (hence this blog). But this jester also loves creative artwork in ephemera or like postage stamps. What I love best is when I see these things in church books while doing genealogy research.

I suppose this was the way to collect fees for church services or civil services. My first stamp is a recent find from the Kingdom of Italy, Calabria Province, Cosenza, village of Castroregio from 1870. I recently found 4 of my wife’s 3x great grandparents (only 28 more to go) in this village and its civil registration books. On the top of every facing pages (a two page set) on the right hand page at the top is this stamp. I only had a few years online in FamilySearch,org, so I do not know if the stamp changes over time. The man commemorated is King Victor Emmanuel II .

 

Poland 1949

Poland1949StampsThese two 5 zloty stamps are from Poland, post World War II. They were found on a 1949 Birth Extract of an 1887 birth of Wiktoria Heliasz born in Biechow.

 

 

Russian-Poland Stamps

twoStamps_1880A_smallTake a look at these two stamps. Your eyes are not fuzzy, the writing is Cyrillic characters and in the Russian language. These were from an 1880 Alegata Church Record. Notice the cancellation mark on the left stamp isan ‘X’ with the dual date:

17/29 August 1880

The dual dates are because Russia was on Julian Calendar, while Poland was on Gregorian Calendar and these were twelve days apart in 1880. It is nice that these online records were in color so you could see exactly how the stamps looked.

 

Austrian-Poland Stamps

1880Stamps_OnBaptismalCertificateThe above five stamps are from  Austrian-Poland partition. They were on an 1880 Baptismal Certificate. I love the Austrian Empire’s elaborate detail (hard to see in these stamps).

ColorAustrianPolandStamp

This next stamp is also from Austrian-Poland. It was on a 1904 Birth Extract with a stamp from 1898  – very nice color and detail shown.

 

 

 

 

 

An Alegata for citizens of two Empires

AustrianStamp_RussianStamp_1886The above two stamps are from the year 1886. It was taken from an 1886 Alegata where the groom was from Krosno in Galicia (Austrian Empire) and the Bride was from  Russian-Poland (Russian Empire). The testimony of baptism was used as proof that the couple could be married in the church. The 50 krone [left stamp] is the Austrian stamp and the 60 kopec [right stamp] was the Russian stamp. I guess each church collected a fee for this marriage to be documented. Latin & Cyrillic all mashed-up.

Because Stanczyk’s ancestors were on one side of the Vistula/Wisla River (Russian-Poland side) and the in-laws were south of the Vistula/Wisla River (Austrian-Poland side) these kind of marriages were somewhat common.  Just cross the bridge at Szczucin. I guess this kind of emigration was allowed by the two empires. The bride was most likely the immigrant (the groom had military duties to fulfill or taxes to pay or work to perform for some royal business).

 

Do not forget to examine the stamps they have a story to tell too.

Have you seen any interesting postage stamps in your research? Then drop me an email.


 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 485 other followers

%d bloggers like this: