Posts tagged ‘Genealogy’

June 9, 2018

Part 3 of Alegata As Time Machine — #Polish #Genealogy #Russian-Poland #Partition #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Biechow 1878 Alegata - Page 12 of Alegata for Marriage 15Stanczyk, welcomes you to the third part of this multi-part Alegata As Time Machine series. As the title suggests this is the third part.

Parts 1 & 2 can be reviewed below:

  1. Alegata As Time Machine — I
  2. Alegata As Time Machine — II

There have been some prior alegata articles (in case you are binging):

  1. 1878 Marriage – Russian Empire bride + Austrian Empire groom
  2. Another Alegata Article
  3. Clever Use Of Alegata

Today’s article is we are going to dissect a typical article and see what we can expect to find. In the fourth part we will look at many sample portions to see the type we might encounter.

First off, be aware that you can click on the images to see larger version of the images to see the fine details. Second, let me remind you, dear reader, that alegata are mostly found in Russian Poland partition but the general knowledge still holds, though the year and the partition may dictate a different language. In this series we will see Russian/Cyrillic, Polish (Latin alphabet), and Latin (the actual language) among the samples. In fact, you may see more than one language in an alegata.

1878 Alegata dissectedToday’s alegata is about the bride who was born outside the parish who is now living in the local parish (Biechów). So the bride is proving she was baptised to marry in the local church.

Let’s look at the various pieces and derive their meaning in this common sample.

Number (1) — It is in Russian. Its meaning is, “Record (akt) # 121, RZEGOCIN”. This margin note ties the data back the Ostrowce parish (in Kielce gubernia, Grotniki gmina). We will see the event type and the year of the remote record in a bit.

Number (2) — Do you see the light, pencilled, “12”? That is what the second bullet pertains to. This “12” indicates we are on the 12th page of alegata. The left side of the image is page 11 and the right side is page 12. The left side, is usually, the back of the prior page’s text.

Number (3) — The top header text, relatively bold in ink is Russian text indicating this is an alegata for an 1878 marriage, the akt #, in the local parish’s 1878 marriages. For the record we are looking Biechow parish (Kielce gubernia, Stopnica gmina), 1878 Alegata book on page 12 (this image).

Number (4) — The fourth part, we are calling out is the record # (akt #) that this alegata is for. In this case it is for Marriage Akt 15, in Biechow parish Marriages.

Number (5) — The fifth bullet is the top of the remote record. It indicates the event type from the remote parish that this alegata page is about. In this case we are looking at a birth record. In Russian/Cyrillic, “рождение” (birth).

Number (6) — The final bullet, (6), is about the birth record (in Polish) and more specifically, the year of that record, which in this case is 1861. Now this is fortuitous because, the online births end at 1859. So for birth years 1860 and forward you would normally have to write to the parish (Ostrowce, św.Jana Chrzciciela) to get this birth record.  At the bottom of the record is the date:

Ostrowce, 4/16th day of August, 1878 (the date this record was extracted from that remote parish’s books).

One final note. Did you notice that the birth was written in Polish (not Russian)? If the remote event record was before 1868 then it will be in Polish. Galicia records are in Latin.

To see the Alegata side-by-side with the Marriage record click on “Continue reading”

read more »

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May 21, 2018

British Royalty Has Polish Royalty DNA — #19th #Cousins

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19 Generations back to Wladyslaw Jagiello (from Prince Harry)

British Royal Family Tree

Prince Harry & Duchess of Sussex Meghan will have children who are 19th cousins to Władysław Jagiełło King of Poland & Grand Duchy Of Lithuania (& Queen Jadwiga)!

❤ 🇵🇱 🇲🇱 🇬🇧 💙

[Thanks to source: http://www.moremaiorum.pl]

Family Tree Pdf:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1hggrx3ZygJUKTHrc5Fz_kzrQTopjPWw6

April 16, 2018

All Politics Is Genealogy — #Politics #Genealogy #USCensus #2020

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

When you’re a jester, you see politics from afar and for such a good many eras. Alas, this jester has typed truth to power for as long as blogs have existed. Still, the 2010’s have been an unusually busy decade (and we still have two more years) for politics & genealogy. Do you agree?

Let’s recount some from this decade:

Obama was not born in USA. Uh, yes he was. Birth Certificate from Hawaii and newspaper announcement substantiated to all but DJT. Oh, how about Trump’s genealogy? Ancestor kicked out of Germany (for illegal emigration). John McCain was born in Panama Canal Zone. American? Yes. Mitt Romney was born in Mexico. American ? Yes. How about Ted Cruz and his Canadian birth to a Cuban father & an American mother who renounced her citizenship and registered & voted in Canada … yet still he professes that he is an American. Me thinks he professes too much.

We also heard and continue to hear about Elizabeth Warner (dubbed Pocohantas by DJT) who talked about her family lore/genealogy including American Indian ancestry (Cherokee). So its 2018, DJT who dodged military service by bonespurs, like his banned ancestor (grandfather was it?) that was kicked out of Germany for not serving in the army before emigrating illegally. Now he wants to deport DACA (Dreamers), even though we have Ted Cruz as a Senator, and a FLOTUS who overstayed her visa and used the “Einstein Exceptional Immigrant” law to be admitted legally (and then chain migrated her parents) to the USA. Oh it does not end there, now the GOP want to bring back an old question on the 2020 census:  “Where were you born and/or are you a US citizen?”

The census genealogy is a new wrinkle in voter suppression and representation. But it also could affect health care & hospitals and all manner of government expenditures that are based upon census demographics. This is actually a very important issue. So let’s unpack the nuances about the census, that most valuable of genealogy documents.

US Censuses

There are a few states that have utilized censuses as well but that is another blog. The US Census has been going every 10 years from 1790-2010, the next being 2020. They do not occur on years ending in ‘5’ as the press secretary seemed to allude. They also have a 72 year privacy rule. So why not fill out the census? It is after all the primary and sole method for apportioning representation. Do not be scared off or representation will go elsewhere (primarily southward). These are precisely the states that have enacted voter suppression laws that discriminate against poor or non-white citizens. So in effect you will be limiting voting and representation to places that are NOT protecting the constitution or your rights given you therein. This is why the census brouhaha in 2018 is so contentious. 2020 Census is coming and what you are asked needs to be finalized … ASAP!

Here is the 72 year privacy rule info:

72 year rule

The U.S. government will not release personally identifiable information about an individual to any other individual or agency until 72 years after it was collected for the decennial census. This “72-Year Rule” (92 Stat. 915; Public Law 95-416; October 5, 1978) restricts access to decennial census records.

After 72 years and then only under circumstances protecting against disclosure to the detriment of any individual according to  44 U.S.C. 2104  (from  Federal Records Act of 1950).

So protection safeguards are built in.

So a president that berates immigrants  (except those he’s married to) as criminals, he reneges on DACA, increases deportations and threatens to limit immigration to rules of his own choosing is talking about Census questions. Why? The answer appears to be, to intimidate naturalized citizens, permanent resident immigrants, visa visitors, and of course those who are not here legally or who over stayed their visas from being counted. As late as April 16th, 2018, the president was saying, the census would be used to prevent illegal voting!?! Uh, Mr. President, the census is private for 72 years, even if an illegal immigrant could vote illegally (not possible), he’d vote in as many as 18 Presidential elections before you knew HE did it. So that is another idiotic premise and fake justification for needing the census question. But it does show your intent to intimidate people, possibly legal citizens who were born elsewhere and became a naturalized citizen. That IS disenfranchisement of voters; voter intimidation. It is illegal. So that is the context on which the battle lines have been drawn.

But they should be counted. The naturalized citizens are entitled to voting (the other classes not). But each is entitled to representation in government as they are taxpayers. Additionally, funding for infrastructure or hospitals and other aid are apportioned by population. If you are not counted then you are losing out on government spending.  Now homeless or poor people who lack documentation or the means to get documentation may be afraid of the government. But if you are not counted then they too stand to lose from  social safety net programs be eliminated or moved to other population centers according to apportionment. So make sure you are counted in the census you are protected! Do not lose your government spending to another locale out of fear or intimidation.

There will be NO access to personally identifiable info for 72 years. The only access is too summaries and other aggregations of the numbers to study issues related to government budgets.

 

Census Questions

The questions from every prior census can be examined at: census questions . Now there are short forms and there are long forms, so there is no short answer to when was the last time a question about citizenship was asked. Before the Civil War the counting questions were more or less related to being male, female, black, white, free, slave.

1860 is the first time the question, “Where were you born?” was asked, including country if not USA. In 1900, they finally ask if you are a citizen or not (as well as where you were born and where your parents were born). So we see a new nuance of citizenship vs nativity. 1970 starts the concept of short form vs long form questions. 85% were short form. The short form did not ask where you were born. The long form asked both where and whether naturalized. 1980 short form merely asks if you are Spanish/Hispanic (not where born or whether a citizen). The Long form (every 7th person) does ask where born & citizenship. Its not clear but it appears as if households with fewer than 7 people just filled in short form.

Be a good citizen. Be an informed citizen and go to:

https://www.census.gov/history/

March 21, 2018

Calculating Consanguinity — #Genealogy #Genetic #Internet

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Y Chromosome ?

Stanczyk learned a new trick! There is software called Wolfram Wolfram AlphaAlpha. It parses your textual question and answers it via its AI/Mathematics engine. The software is similar to smart-assistants like  Siri or Alexa being asked a question, except Alpha coming from Wolfram is really great at math. It also is parsing your typed words. So I mostly used it for math. But, a facebook user told me to use Wolfram Alpha to calculate if our common ancestor indicated kinship. It did not:

My grand-aunt’s husband’s first cousin’s wife

Degree of kinship

I could try my cousin’s son who just tested his DNA. Do we share a Y chromosome?

1st cousin once removed

Since this jester is indeed male, we do share a Y-chromosome. Our degree of kinship is five (father, grandparents, uncle, 1stcousin,

1stcousin-once-removed). Our blood relationship is 3.125% (1/32). Now the 32 (in 1/32) is derived from the degree of kinship. (1/(2^5))= 1/32= 0.03125= 3.125% . Very cool. Now I don’t need to keep a chart around to calculate my degree of kinship or estimated percentage of dna shared.

Thanks Camille N Greg!

Now some useful notes for you to try. The Wolfram Alpha is an iphone app and its also a web app, runable via a link (URL):

http://m.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=my+uncle%27s+grandson

Notice I took a shortcut. That will hurt the Y-chromosome calculation which depends on gender. Type the following instead:

my father’s brother’s son’s son

Which is the same as:

my uncle’s grandson

Apparently, the shorter form does not lend itself to helping the software determine all genders.

February 25, 2018

The Other Things Found — #Historical #Polish #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

While Stanczyk was searching newspapers for military conscripts, he found many items useful to genealogy…

Today was a landholders chart for Niegosławice village, in Pacanów gmina, Stopnica powiat of 22-June-1933.

Found in Newspaper: Kielecki Dziennik Wojewódzki

Stanczyk would like to call your attention to one of his ancestors, on line 12 (Leon Wleciał).

This chart had four columns:

Line Number, Landholder(s), Plot Number, Plot area in ha (hectares).

So on Line #12 (col. 1), we see Leon Wleciał (col. 2), Plot #18 (col. 3), 6.1019ha (col. 4).

This Leon was not the Leon who came to America, but the Leon who was a witness/god-father in church records for the Wleciałowscy who came to America (and some who stayed in Poland too).

You want to search for:

Okręgowego Urzęd Ziemskiego

(Official District Land in <gubernia-name>).

January 3, 2018

Rootsweb Dead … Again? #Genealogy #Ancestry

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Rootsweb Dead? … #UnavailableStanczyk

is getting inquiries again. Is Rootsweb dead?

Yes …

Rootsweb d. 23-Dec-2017

Rootsweb Security Notification

It should be revived after some serious changes to the website and its security.

This jester originally thought it was “phishing” but quickly there was no Rootsweb website, just the notice and other genealogists were tweeting about this!

So I changed my concern to what is the exposure? Ancestry and Rootsweb accounts typically share a password! So I immediately changed my Ancestry password and I will verify its changed when Rootsweb is back, but at least Ancestry is safeguarded.

Stanczyk also downloaded my gedcom from Ancestry. This seemed a prudent thing to do. I routinely download it once a month or after a large series of updates (that I really do NOT want to repeat).

Please change your Ancestry password immediately (right after reading this blog)! If you use that Rootsweb password for many websites then update those websites as well.

Oh some of this jester’s data, like Dziennik Polski (Detroit) is unavailable until Rootsweb is back. The data is safe and backed up!

Be safe in 2018!

April 3, 2017

Polonia In Canadian Expeditionary Forces in WWI — #Genealogy #Polish 🇨🇦🇺🇸

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon



How to find government military records.

If you have a name of an ancestor who may have fought at Vimy , you should start by searching Library and Archives Canada’s online database of Personnel Records of the First World War.

The Personnel Records of the First World War database includes the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service files.

So far (1-April-2017), nearly 417,000 out of 640,000 of these full files have been digitized, with more added every two weeks.

The service files are typically 25 to 75 pages long and include records on enlistment, training, medical and dental procedures, disciplinary actions, payments, medals, discharges and deaths.

In cases where the full service file isn’t yet uploaded, you may still be able see digitized enlistment records that contain birthplaces, next of kin, addresses, religions, trades and physical characteristics.

Start by typing in the surname and hitting search on this page. Click on the name in the search results. You will likely see an uploaded image of their enlistment document that you can click on that to enlarge it.

If you also see the words “Digitized service file – PDF format” followed by a number, click on the number and the entire scanned service file will open. These files are very large so it may require a fast internet connection to download, or take minutes to appear on your screen.

For example, you can see the first nine pages of John Lescinski’s service record (top of blog). In thus case there were forty (40) pages in the accompanying PDF.

It’s not always clear in the service files whether a person served in a particular battle, like at Vimy Ridge. However, that may be found in the online database of War Diaries of the First World War, which include daily accounts of what troops did in the field. These diaries contain very little personal information, but do show where units were deployed.

Take care. It only showed my first two pages with a link to download the PDF (which actually had 40 pages).

My link (John Lescinski):

http://flip.it/hPTIUh

March 18, 2017

Stanley Babiarz from Pacanów — #Birth

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Akt#50 (lower left corner of church register image):

For Elizabeth E. (on ancestry).

Akt#50

Record Date: 21-March-1885   Parish: Pacanów

Father: Józef Babiarz of Rataje, age 30

Witnesses:  Walenty Madej, age 26,  Walenty Czapliak age 46

Birth Date: today? (21-March-1885)

Mother: Marianna (née) Smystek age 25

Baby: Stanisław

god parents: Józef Plakta(sp?) & Salomeja Wybraniowa

June 15, 2016

RootsWeb Upgrade — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RootsWeb Source: THE ANCESTRY INSIDER

“We are currently working to move the entirety of RootsWeb to new machinery that can handle the load and be backed up in a consistent and reliable manner,” says Ancestry.com’s Anne Mitchell.
“Ancestry is making the switchover this week. During that time, you may notice short periods when RootsWeb is unavailable.”

Ancestry Insider believes that RootsWeb / Ancestry are making this upgrade to generate good will.

After the RootsWeb crash back in February,  the RootsWeb community, expressed themselves effectively and Ancestry is responding! When Ancestry acquired RootsWeb, they said they would keep it running.

Thank you Ancestry for keeping that promise.

Rootsweb is a very old genealogy resource that just needed some love to keep and enhance its usefulness to the genealogical community.

Stanczyk complained and apparently other Rootsweb users were also complaining that new additions to RootsWeb were not being indexed. This includes GEDCOMs uploaded to WorldConnect, Obituary Daily Times, and mail archives. This jester had to drop my trees and move to Tribalpages.

So, after this upgrade is finished, Ancestry will have fixed that. If it is indeed fixed, perhaps Stanczyk can move a family tree back.

You may have experienced some data loss the last time RootsWeb went down. That will not be happening during the outages this week, as these are planned, controlled, outages.

May 19, 2016

Romanov Russian Royalty … REDUX

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This jester has a deep appreciation for Dr. Stephen Morse and his many works, especially those related to genealogy. I have used his One Step Web Page for many years. So it was thrill to meet him at various conferences and I was touched at his kind offer to help  moje zona read her grandparent’s tombstone (alas the jester struggles with his Hebrew language skills). I have followed his recent work to make yet a 3rd generation soundex algorithm (for us Slavics).

Originally, we had American Soundex, which you still see on Immigration documents (mine is E420). Then along came the most excellent Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex which was a vast improvement for those whose heritage was Slavic (mine is 084000) and you would see it on Russian Consular records.  Recently Dr Morse has developed the Bieder-Morse Soundex algorithm which further improves name matches (by eliminating false matches). So my family name would have Bieder-Morse soundex tokens of:  elaS elas [exact match tokens only] . I think only the JewishGen website has implemented that matching.

Now Dr Morse has an article(Genetic Genealogy Revisited) in the APG’s professional journal: “Association of Professional Genealogists QUARTERLY”. It was on the use of genetics in genealogy and he used the Romanov Family mystery as a demonstration of using genetics to solve a question. Now I read in the Current issue of the Smithsonian,  the Resurrecting the Czar, article. It too covers the latest background on murder mystery of Czar Nicholas II and his family and attendants. I found that the two aritcles read together give a fascinating account of the story.

Now this jester is not a fan of the Russian Empire (even though my grandparents and their parents were born into Russian-Poland partition).  The Rus betrayal of Poland not even a century after the great  King Jan Sobieski, the Savior of Vienna [indeed all of Europe],  the “Lion of Lechistan” and  their betrayal again in 1939 at the start of World War II sour my feelings for our brother Rus. So while I enjoyed the two articles read back-to-back, I was appalled by a few “royalists” who want to bring back the monarchy to the Russian Federation. One woman artist actually is hoping for a Russian fascist (to clean up the mess??) followed by a transition back to the monarchy. That would be quite a rewind of history huh?

Czech, Lech and Rus – there is a legend of three brothers that settled central and eastern Europe. Czech went on to found the Czechs and Rus went on to found the Russians. Lech and Lechistan became Poland. So we can see again that monarchies and the battles between them are really nothing more than family squabbles done on a grand scale. By the way both articles mention the British monarchy  and their family connection to the Romanovs (via Hapsburgs).  Canute the Great was a Grandson of Mieszko I (first king of Poland) and of course another ancestor of this jester, the twice king Stanislaw Leszczynski, had a daughter marry into the Bourbons. Alas all of Poland’s goodwill and family relationships could not prevent the Deluge and Poland’s slip from History’s main stage. We will have to content ourselves that Rus and their partitions, produced Kosciuszko and Pulaski and they in turn helped to produce America.

Now we come to 2016 …

There is an artist,  Olga Shirnina, who has taken Romanov family photos and colorized them. Please read the article: RBTH (Romanov family photos in color) from “Russia Beyond The Headlines”.
Romanov Links:

Romanov Photos British Archives

Romanov Family Tree

September 22, 2015

Ancestry.com Releases App Version 6.7 — #Genealogy #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

Ancestry App version 6.7

– Ancestry.app 6.7 (click to go to App Store)

Early today (22-September-2015) — The latest version of Ancestry’s app version 6.7 was released. Now 90.5MB  in size.

The download is specific to handling images. The quality and ease of dealing with images in your smartphone was greatly improved!

April 15, 2015

Ancestry — Time For Ancestry App ? —  #Genealogy Techno#Genea 

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

ancestry app in appstore

The newest version of the Ancestry App 📱 (6.5) is here.  Genealogy on the go has reached a new level of portability for those with an Apple Watch⌚️ !

Lets see if the optimized matching is like MyHeritage or exactly what “enhanced search results” entails (more to come).

Option to delete trees within the app seems risky with touch screens. Caution would be advised and practice on a test tree before doing this for real.

 

🇵🇱 — I hope your using iOS 8.3, otherwise you may be seeing aliens (instead of iPhone, Apple Watch, Polish Flag)

 

 


March 22, 2015

530 Years After Death, Richard III Reburied

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

530 years after death, Richard III honored before reburial

Richard III finally is buried 22-MARCH-2015 in a marked grave.

Update your family trees Anglo Genealogists. 

 #AccuracyInGenealogy

Tags: ,
January 16, 2015

RAOGK is Back — #Genealogy #Volunteer #Collaborate

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RAOGK

RAOGK (Random Acts Of Genealogical Kindness) is back. Their website raogk.org is trying to rebuild the database of volunteers. The RAOGK pages on Facebook appear to be unconnected but were created to fill the void when RAOGK.org disappeared a few years ago.

Welcome back back RAOGK!  If any of you are Polonia in the USA or are from Poland, then email me and I’ll note it here in the blog. In my day, I too was a RAOGK volunteer.

Now you can provide raogk via Facebook groups (and yes even through the old Yahoo Groups that pre-dated Facebook), volunteer to do indexing through a local society or through FamilySearch.org, (or other Indexing projects, like Ancestry’s World Archives Project). I have been a part of many of those too as well hanging out in Rootsweb/Ancestry forums.

Genealogy is collaborative. If you can go back 30+ generations (less if you are Polish like this blogger), then you are related to me and you  are helping family. At least that is how I think about it. Also many have paid me this kindness, how can I not pay it forward too?

Collaborate … Volunteer its good for you and for all.


December 23, 2014

Christmas Wish #2014 — #Polish #Genealogy #Tradition

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

XmasWishStanczyk wanted to wish all the best of the Season’s Greeting !

— So today’s blog article is what I wish for us genealogists.

 

Wishes

  1. That bloggers add, “#genealogy” and “#Polish” (or whatever specialty) to their blog titles and/or their body of their blogs, Facebook posts, Twitter tweets. You may have noticed this author adds “#Genealogy” at the end of my blog titles. The reason being is these articles are shared with: Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, & LinkedIn. These hashtags help researchers find our stuff in Google/Bing/Yahoo search engines. I feel the #Polish is vitally important for other genealogy researchers  to find us. Please try and add this to your social posts.
  2. That people join Polish Genealogical Societies.
  3. That people try to perform one act of genealogical kindness or partake in one genealogy project each year. Genealogy is perhaps the one research that benefits most from “crowd-sourcing” or other collaboration.
  4. In Jonathan Shea’s book, Going Home , he lists in Appendix A, Polish Parishes around the USA. Almost every state has one or more. Can we all go around to the nearest local Polish church and photograph and index the names on the tombstones/headstones from the cemeteries with the dates? Email whatever you get to Stanczyk (click on image) and I will see it gets to PGSCT&NE for their project and/or post on the web in this blog or elsewhere as appropriate. This will enable all to find the data via web searches.
  5. That Polish bloggers, journals/e-zines and newspapers cross refer each other to their readers. I know I will do a Polish Newspaper column in January in this blog. Of course, my blog roll refers you readers to other Polish Blogs too.

Does anybody else have any good suggestions for wishes? Email me or Comment on this blog article.

Wesołych Świąt i Szczęśliwego Nowego Roku !


 

 

 

October 17, 2014

Genealogy Roadshow — Philadelphia … #Genealogy , #Media . #TV

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenealogyRoadshow_Philly

Stanczyk enjoys PBS and Genealogy. PBS has the excellent series Antique Roadshow so why not a Genealogy Roadshow? This is another fine genealogical series that complements the excellent work by Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr (Finding Your Roots).

Well the PBS crew, featuring  genealogists Kenyatta D. Berry, Joshua Taylor and Mary Tedesco are coming to Philadelphia, October 25th and 26th to film. This will be broadcast during the winter season coming up.

You can attend this event too. The details are on the Genealogy Roadshow website .

For those unfamiliar with Philadelphia genealogy, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP). will be featured. Many of the founding families have their genealogies recorded in book-form in a lovely room chock full of leather bound books of family histories.

#GenealogyPBS

October 15, 2014

Wordless Wednesday — Searching For O Z A R O W I C Z #Meme , #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Uzarowicz_CYRYLLICStanczyk  —  has a great-grandmother, Aniela Major / Majer who was the daughter or Marcin Major and Katazyna Ozarowicz. I have found some Major in church records. But, as yet I have been unable to locate Ozarowicz records that connect to my family tree.

At the top is an image, of the OZAROWICZ  (aka Uzarowicz) name as written in Russian/Cyrillic. My Ozarowicz were from Biechow parish (of Stopnica area in the old wojewodztwo Kielce). So today, I am announcing in this blog that I am searching for Ozarowicz from Biechow area.

Click on my Stanczyk  image and drop me an electronic missive if you are one or know one. Thanks!

May 22, 2014

Genealogy Websites Mash-up — #Genealogy, #Military, #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

About two years ago Stanczyk wrote about a website, special because it was a Polish-German joint effort at Reconciliation.  The website I am referring to is: http://www.straty.pl/index.php/szukaj-w-bazie — Which takes you to a database search page where you can search for, “Victims of Oppression“.  It for searching for victims of World War II inside Poland.  Originally, I kind of ignored it because I did not have family who was sent to  a  Concentration Camp nor did any of mine get forced relation after the war. So I  MISTAKENLY thought this database was not for me. Last week I learned a few things.

Today’s blog is about the Mash-up of  Geneteka database,  Using Straty.pl (the above database of oppression) and a website of Concentration Camps, with a smidgeon of Genbaza.pl thrown in for good measure.

Here is my Mash-Up …

Straty.pl I went to straty.pl (use above link, for Polish) or paste the above link into Google’s Translator (for English). I put ‘Elijasz’ into the field named “Nazwisko” (Surname) and clicked on the button “Szukaj” (Search). It returned four results for me:

Straty Results - Four Elijasz

Notice the third row, with Stanislaw Elijasz, whose “Miejsce urodzenie” (birth place) was Pacanów. When I clicked on the button with the number “3”.  Remember his birthdate: 1906-04-17 ; We will use this data in Geneteka to get the Akt # and in GenBaza.pl to get the image of the birth record. When I clicked on the number “3” button, I got a lot more info:

Straty Details Stanislaw Elijasz

I immediately, understood my mistake. The oppression database returned data about my ancestor, Stanislaw Elijasz who was a soldier in the Polish Army when World War II started (1-SEP-1939). He is listed as a victim of the September 1939 Campaign, he was caught, in “Russland” [I presume they mean in the Russian Occupied territory as opposed to the German Occupied Poland.], he was the equivalent of a Lance Corporal in a Signal Corps Battalion. At any rate, he was interred in POW Camp (the 1st of three) on September 17, 1939. Imagine that, he spent the entire World War II as a prisoner of war.

The other details were vague and not clear to me from the data. Lucky for me in Facebook, I have a friend, named Jozef Taran (in Poland). He provided me a website for concentration camps:

Small_2http://www.moosburg.org/info/stalag/laglist.html#generalgouvernement

This second mash-up link was website of German Stalags (Concentration Camps) in Poland, Ukraine and Western Russia. This website and wikipedia pages gave me the details to understand the data returned by straty.pl  for Stanislaw. You World War II  military buffs take note !

Ok, but now I wanted to find which Stanislaw Elijasz of Pacanow, born on or about 17-APRIL-1906 was this data about. So I went to:

Small_3Geneteka.pl — to see if Stanislaw was indexed and what his birth record number (Akt #) might be to help me in my search of GenBaza.pl and to confirm the birth date. I found on result number 46,  a result for Stanislaw born in 1906 Pacanow with an Akt # 77. Now I had enough info to locate his birth record in:

Small_4

 GeneBaza.pl  — That link takes you directly to Stanislaw Elijasz, born in Pacanow on 17-April_1906, Akt #77 [assuming you have a GenBaza login id and you are logged in]. This gives the the church birth record image:

GenBaza_Stanislaw

Now we have a complete picture of our Polish ancestor by the mash-up of websites:

  1. straty.pl
  2. http://www.moosburg.org/info/stalag/laglist.html#generalgouvernement
  3. Geneteka.pl
  4. GeneBaza.pl
May 20, 2014

Tomasz Leszczyński – de Biechów, Innkeeper, Shoemaker, Bourgeois Farmer — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Tomasz LeszczynskiStanczyk’s  great-grandfather, Tomasz — Tomasz Leszczyński – de Biechów was an Innkeeper, a Shoemaker, and Bourgeois Farmer and these were just his listed occupations in the church records from Biechów, Pacanów, Stopnica. There is also a good bit of family lore surrounding Tomasz as well. For example, Tomasz lived to be 104 years old, he had two wives and 15 children via these two wives spanning 45 years of reproductive life — so indeed Tomasz was a productive and prolific man.

But it is the things about Tomasz that this jester does not know that obsess me. For example, I do not know Tomasz’s first marriage details. I wish I did then I would know with certainty his parents’ names. Or if I knew his birth details I could know his parents’ names and then locate his siblings, if any. I also need his death details too. At least then I would have an anchor point for his 104 year span of life then and that would lend me more info for deciding between various Tomasz contenders. The solace I have,  is that 15 births of children and some children’s deaths too have provided me with many data points with which to make inferences.  Even the two spouses’ births and deaths have provided data points.

So this jester is in the midst of performing a detailed SNA (social network analysis) also known as “cluster genealogy” of these data points. I will produce that and  write about my findings here when it is complete. At the UPGS conference, I was able to do research in a new village Wolica and I located a birth record for a Tomasz Leszczyński that fits data points. That led me to another village named Dzieraznia and yet another possible generation. At present I am only about 75-80% confident that I have the correct Tomasz, hence the SNA study. There is much work to do, but I have updated my Tomasz Leszczynski Timeline with many finds over the past couple years, including the finds from GenBaza.pl just this year when I located my paternal grandmother’s birth record! This grandmother of mine  (Walerya)  was Tomasz’s eldest child by his second wife Aniela Majer (aka Major)

May 16, 2014

UPGS 2014 – Polish Genealogy Conference Review

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

upgsStanczyk attended this conference this year after missing the last two occurrences. So it is with fresh eyes and yet a knowledge of now having attended 4 of these UPGS conferences over the years.

The presenters were a strong group: D. Joshua Taylor, Ceil Wendt Jensen, Greg NelsonSonia Hoeke-Nishimoto,  Mark Olsen, and Tadeusz Pilat. The first two have been on TV genealogy shows and are therefore well known.  Ceil has been a part of so many Polish Genealogical media/conferences/organizations that her credibility as a UPGS presenter is top-notch. Sonia and Greg are both members of FamilySearch.org and you can often find Sonia in FHL, plus she does Polish genealogy research for her own family tree. Greg Nelson is also the replacement Kahlile Mehr at FamilySearch and so his presence was welcome (as Kahlile’s  presence was missed). Mark Olson was from MyHeritage and Tadeusz Pilat a presenter from Warsaw Poland and a ProGenealogists.com professional.

The conference had 11 presentations over 4 days, leaving some time for research and to attend optional FHL classes. The evenings had special events, including a banquet and a Wesoły Lud Folk Dance Ensemble performance for attendees. There appeared to be about 70+ attendees but there was just a single tract (unfortunately no choice in presentations, but they were all in one place — no getting lost). The presentations were split between Genealogy and Technology as the 2014 Conference proceedings cover shows. The Conference proceedings was good quality and included the presentation abstracts plus extra  material and sponsor materials. This was well thought out and organized, and the Schedule thoughtfully included  the hours for when FHL was open. My only suggestion for the Proceedings was to mention the Conference Room for the Presentations, which in this case  was the same room for all presentations. It was not a problem as the organizers were present to hand-out materials and answer questions and once you knew the conference room it was the same for all presentations — so only a small error of omission.

Josh Taylor did 3 presentations. Two were on Technology. The problem with Technology presentations is that you need to know your audience and deliver to their level but in UPGS people have computer/technology experience of varying levels. This jester has had an entire career in Technology and I know at least two others present also made their careers with computers/technology and one man from Texas had technology focus and his own website that he maintained and developed. Today it is hard to find a genealogist that has not embraced technology. None-the-less the crowd ranged from rank beginners to very advanced and Josh targeted the very beginners. This was a bad decision by UPGS organizers because there was only one tract, I had nowhere else to go, except to the FHL.

If you had multiple tracts and the attendee could choose another presentation then it would be ok. In fairness, the technology presentations should also be evenly split across: beginner, medium and advanced experience attendees. But all of Josh’s presentations were at the lowest level and the material even then was not very substantive. After his presentation, I asked the UPGS/UPGSA director why don’t you have the presenters put their PowerPoints online so we do not have to write down links (URLs) or so that we can cut/paste forms into usable documents. Astonishingly, he said, “Because these are the presenter’s property. Their work-in-trade.” I did not have the heart to tell him that too many of the presentations were worthless if these were examples of that person’s professional body of work. I did not want to argue that most large conferences do EXACTLY as I requested/suggested we at UPGS do. Almost every presenter said if you email me, I will send you my presentation. If that is so then why not upload the presentation online at the UPGS or UPGSA website?

This attitude on this UPGSA organizer’s part of rebuffing suggestions is precisely why UPGS is only 70+ people and one tract of presentations and some of those presentations were sub-par. In truth the conference has not changed since I last attended in 2008. No growth and the quality of the banquet  was less and it seemed less Genealogical Society support than in 2008 and before.

 

The Presentations:

Advancing Your Polish Research“, by Sonia Hoeke-Nishimoto

Maps & Gazetteers for Genealogy“, by Sonia Hoeke-Nishimoto

Immigration Agents“, by Ceil Jensen

The Peasant & the Palace: Research Manor Records“, by Ceil Jensen

“This is Women’s Work — Midwifery”, by Ceil Jensen

Creating Your Personal Family History Website“, by Josh Taylor

New Tools & Ideas in Research“, by Josh Taylor

“Keynote: Family History in Pop Culture“, by Josh Taylor

“MyHeritage.com”, by Mark Olsen

“Notary Records In Poland”, by Tadeusz Pilat

“Searching the 3 Partitions at FHL; LDS Filming Projects in Poland”, by Greg Nelson

 

Can you see the flaws? Too few presentations. There needs to be at least two tracts so people have some choice. Further more, attendees should rate the presentations 1 … 11 (the # of presentations) so that organizers can see what the attendees like (or do NOT like). Also, 8 of the 11 presentations were by just three people. Nowhere near enough presenters. We need more diversity. You cannot tell me this was done to keep quality high, because as I said some of the 11 presentations were sub-par. No quality in limited presenters. Indeed, it causes presenters to “recycle” their efforts and the short durations 75 minutes probably meant that they cut some material from these recycled presentations leaving the attendee with an “unsatisfied” feeling from these content-lite (or content-free) send-ups. Perhaps if we had two tracts we could go to 90 minute presentations. These presentations could not be put up on the Internet??? Please organizers, you need to attend some more conferences and see how things are done BETTER and get some fresh ideas and perhaps decentralize the control of what is done/presented.

Don’t get this jester wrong. Ceil Jensen hit another three home runs. Sonia’s  work was informative and appealing high quality. Josh Taylor did a very good job with the banquet Keynote presentation. Tadeusz’s presentation was one I was looking forward to — to find new avenues of research in Poland beyond church records. It was well done and his English was good enough to present a high-quality send-up. I liked Greg Nelson’s sharing of what was happening in FamilySearch for Polish Genealogists. Mark Olsen won me over about MyHeritage.com. You knew it was going to be a bit commercial, but he was convincing of the special technology that they have in their matching. He even made the commercial part disappear by offering EVERY attendee a free trial ! When this jester, needled Mark with a question about how many Polish genealogists MyHeritage had, he gleefully answered by showing us,within the tool itself,  a map of how many accounts by country and the country Poland was over 1 Million members (on par with Germany)! Obviously some genealogists in the USA would need to be added on top but an accurate demographic of US genealogists by ethnicity, does not exist . I like the idea of the UPGS including a presenter from Europe at each UPGS. Obviously, a Polish researcher would be preferred but one with Eastern/Central European expertise would also  be welcome. This “cross-Atlantic”, cross pollination of information exchange is a valuable goal. It seems we have done many times already. So kudos, for keeping this idea going and for the selection of Tadeusz Pilat,

So it was really just the Technology presentations that I felt were not valuable and the organizer’s entrenchment over simple suggestions that they could make for free and improve this conference. This only happens every other year, so you would think incorporating change and improvements would be easy and also be welcomed,  given that much time to put on the next UPGS. Here is one more suggestion for the UPGS organizers. Perhaps the UPGSA needs to appoint a person whose sole focus is putting on the UPGS conference and training this person on how it is done now, what the costs drivers are and what the revenues are  and asking the UPGSA members to provide suggestions for what they want to see in a new conference. Also I think the other regional Polish Genealogy Societies also need input into what would improve UPGS. I personally would welcome paying $25-$30 more (i.e. raise conference fee) for registration to get a 2nd tract of presenters. In my over 15 years  of genealogy, I have NEVER once seen a call for papers or presentations. I have seen them for ROOTS Tech conference and I have seen them for the IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy. I have even seen the call for papers from FEEFHS.

I think the USPGSA and all regional Polish genealogy societies need to email ALL of their members and request papers/abstracts for presentations for each and every conference. I am a member of several societies and never seen it except for the conferences I have attended: ROOTS Tech & IAJGS Conference. It seems like the presentations are all done by people well connected to conference organizers. More diversity / more opportunity. OH UPGS organizers get some more presentations specific to Polish Genealogy. I was really disappointed by the presenters who said they have no Polish Genealogy experience … REALY at UPGS ??? What are you thinking? I did enjoy meeting old friends and long time Polish Genealogists again and doing some catch-up, perhaps we need some way of doing that.

This conference fails to teach new Polish Genealogists on Polish Genealogy topics. I think that limits the UPGS from growing. We also need to make it so genealogy vendors come and sell at the conference and they help defray the costs by charging for vendor tables. The UPGSA should produce an online PDF document, “How To Present At The UPGS Conference” so that other people know how to submit proposals, what they will face when they get to Salt Lake City and how to hook up their laptops to the projector. Make it a comfortable and welcome process for new presenters and for people to provide suggestions.

Each Polish Genealogical Society needs to sponsor one presenter at the UPGS (if their paper is chosen).  That way we can see material from all over the USA from recognized genealogists and the costs of presenters is born by each society to share the expense of putting on UPGS while sharing control/input amongst them all.  I missed seeing Matthew Bielawa, Jonathan Shea, Lisa Alzo. How long has it been since NY or Toledo had a presenter at UPGS? Perhaps other Polish Fraternal Groups could also help support this conference via ads or sponsorship of national speakers. Finally, show us Polish Genealogy bloggers some love:  Give us quality  pics of  the speakers to use in blogs and access to any/all  speakers for quick interviews. Why not make an UPGS organizer available for question & answer interviews to bloggers?  Why not list bloggers and Polish genealogy websites in the Conference Proceedings?

Let’s grow this thing!  Oh by the way, this jester’s suggestions are in BOLD-RED UPGSA, just in case you want some feedback.

If you agree or disagree let this jester know. Just email me.

 

 

May 11, 2014

♥ Happy Mothers Day ♥ — #Genealogy, #German, #Croatia, #Romanian, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Happy Mother’s Day 2014   – First, Stanczyk wishes to thank my wife on Mother’s Day and then to wish all mothers a day of  joy.

I love my wife, Teréza, and one of my goals for my recent research trip  was to find her paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages. I have some clues from American records, but Jewish records are hard to locate. But I was able to locate a census  of the Austrian Hungarian Empire for the Maramaros region and the village of Kovesliget in particular which is very near to the present day border of Ukraine (by Khust) and inside Romania. The only record I found for that locale was from 1828 census, so I cannot prove that Misek Volfe (Jewish) is a direct line ancestor of her paternal grandmother, Bessie Wolf. But it does confirm for me that I have the correct locale from the US records.

 

For my own mother, Rosemary, I was able to locate her Vespeks in Sarvas (Osijek-Baranja county of modern day, Eastern Croatia).  This corresponds to the LDS microfilm: FHL INTL Film # 1739003 Items 1-3. I first had an inkling from my maternal grandfather, Jozef Vespek’s naturalization papers.  I also had seen some records that FamilySearch had posted on-line and so I had more than an inkling that I would find Vespeks in the LDS microfilm. I also found Reiter, which had been in the ship manifest for my mom’s half brothers (Jozef & Vendelin when they came from their uncle Rajter).

Genealogy is all about your family … those people in your tree and Mother’s Day is another fine day to honor those named therein, particularly the mothers.

mday

March 15, 2014

Rochester, Monroe County, NY & LESZCZYNSKI — #Genealogy, #Polish, #NY

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

JanLeszczynskiFamilyStanczyk has been busy with his research in metryki.genbaza.pl  . One of my surprising finds was that my grandmother’s eldest [half]-brother Jan lived in Rochester ( in Monroe County, NY ). I recently found Jan Leszczynski in the AP Kielce archive data on GenBaza – his marriage and a few children (with Antonina Sieradzka). Jan came from his son Feliks in Falecin, Stopnica parish, Kielce Gubernia, Poland and went to his son Jan P. Leszczynski in Rochester, NY. Also, Jan (the elder) had another son, Wladyslaw who also came to Rochester, NY.

So I am looking for genealogists tracing or related to this family of Leszczynski in Rochester, NY. Here are a few addresses:

302 Weaver Rd.

304 Weaver Rd.

13 Ernst Rd.

357 Wilkins Street

All are in Rochester, NY. All had Leszczynski related to me living at the above addresses. If you are related to them, then we are related. Please contact me (click on Stanczyk pic to email me) and we can trade info/pictures. It also appears that Jan (the elder) also had a brother Frank Leszczynski that lived briefly in Rochester. This Frank Leszczynski also lived in: Depew, Buffalo, Tonawanda too [All in Erie County, NY]. Both Jan and Frank are sons of my great-grandfather Tomasz Leszczynski.

I have attached a local map below of Rochester, Monroe County, New York of a small section of town known as the Polish Section which had two Catholic churches very near to my Leszczynski families. It is possible and likely that my ancestors would have been parishioners at one of these churches.

There was a Catholic church, St. Stanislaus on St. Stanislaus Street and a Polish National Catholic Church at 40 Ernst Street. Both of these would have been very near to the Leszczynski families I am searching for.

Rochester Polish Section Map

Rochester_PolishSection

March 7, 2014

Another Alegata Article — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Russian, #Cyrillic

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19070124_Alegata_Marr_Elijasz_Leszczynski copy

75 kopeks. The cost of that stamp on an alegata. In case, you cannot read Cyrillic or do not recognize it on the cancellation mark of the stamp — it says:

11/24 January 1907

This stamp appeared on an alegata document, describing my paternal grandparents, Jozef Elijasz & Waleryja Leszczynska. You can see from the civil and church records of theirs, that this is their marriage date.

So now I have three Polish  authoritative sources for their marriage (date/place).

I found this alegata a bit fascinating. First it had the stamp. Second it listed my grandfather & his parents, but only my grandmother (without her parents  — fortunately, the other two records listed those parents). Third and most puzzling is the marriage bann dates:

13th, 20th, 27th January [of 1907 implied]. But wait a minute, the date of the alegata is 11/24 January, 1907. That is three days before their marriage date. So this “official document” had listed a future date [of the marriage], I guess giving them permission to marry in the church assuming the 3rd bann was a foregone conclusion. The future date so messed with my mind and comprehension of Russian/Cyrillic that I had to check and recheck the three documents to assure myself I was reading it correctly and that they had used a future date in the alegata!

Oh, the 11/24 January 1907 thing?  That is just the custom of “dual dating”. The earlier date is the Julian date: 11-January-1907, as the Russian calendar was still using the Julian calendar. While the 24-January-1907 is the Gregorian calendar that we use today. Of course you can find liturgical calendars (Russian Orthodox for example) that still use the Julian Calendar for their religious events (i.e. EASTER). Why is it 13 days difference?  They were in the 20th century and another day difference between the two calendars, as compared to the majority of the church records (1868-1900 during when the Russian language  was the defacto language of administration records) in the Russian partition which were 12 days apart.

— — —  Alegata …

read more »

February 26, 2014

Wordless Wednesday – Ludwik Elijasz Family View

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

A couple of days ago Stanczyk published a tip for using Alegata online images to supplement/replace having a marriage record. So here is the genealogy record for Ludwik Elijasz (and his two wives, siblings and parents). Where’s Maryanna Wierzbocka? She is Maryanna Przylucka (Wierzbocka) Elijasz. :

Ludwik Elijasz

December 30, 2013

Family Legacy …

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

BooksThe Junior Classics – 1938

As a genealogist, and many of Stanczyk’s readers are genealogists, we are of course leaving a legacy in our research. As a Polish-American, I also leave cultural legacies related to Thanksgiving or 4th of July or Easter or Christmas.

But I wanted share yet another personal legacy that I am sharing. You see those colorful books at the top of the blog? They are a series of ten books by COLLIER — The Junior Classics. It was a series of hardback books filled with stories & poems across a spectrum of genres from 1938!

My parents bought me this set as a child. I was not a good bibliophile as a child and our books became gradually marred. I kept one book (orange) of poems. The picture is of a set I was able to locate via the Internet and purchase to share with the children from  Teréza & my marriage. I wanted to share my love of reading with our children as my mother & father had done for me. So a legacy of reading, learning, and exploring and also a love for bound books … as anachronistic as that may be today or in the future. Thank God that someone else had preserved such a cultural treasure from the past — these books are 75 years old! I hope my and Tereza’s kids can maintain this legacy and the act of reading stories & funny onomapoeiatic poems to their children too.

That is a legacy that connects our generations.

P.S. – kids,  my favorite volumes were #1 & #3 and because of my father and his readings, also #10 .

September 14, 2013

Ayn Rand – Alice O’Connor – Alicia Rosenbaum — #Russian, #Jewish, #Genealogyk

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

AynRanOConnor_PetitionCitz_page1

AynRanOConnor_PetitionCitz_page2

In Stanczyk’s first genealogical examination on Ayn Rand’s genealogy:

 Ayn Rand – A Genealogical Examination — 15th-August-2012

I omitted publishing her citizenship papers, which I am now including in this article.

“Alice” applied for citizenship on 29th June 1929. She declared herself to be a Hebrew (i.e. that she was Jewish), not Russian. She also said she emigrated from Mexico (clearly a lie) and that her last residence was Petrograd, Russia. Her occupation was ‘clerk’.

I say clearly a lie, since her Ship Manifest that records her REAL arrival on, 19-Feb-1926 as Alice Rosenbaum  arriving in New York City, NY on board the SS De Grasse. I just wanted to emphasize that she was a liar on numerous occasions when it suited her purposes. So I guess I can conclude that Objectivism includes a tenet of lying  — tough to base a philosophy/economic theory on lies. That is not intellectualism, that is an academic fraud.

On March 13, 1931 she was granted citizenship. You can see her citizenship is 5 years after her REAL arrival.  So what was June 29th, 1929 if not an arrival date?  It was a return from her honeymoon vacation! Do you see how she twists things to suit her purposes?

In the original article I did mention that she collected Social Security & Medicare to pay for her lung cancer surgery & medical bills. I forgot to mention that she had applied for Social Security before 1951 (probably in the  1930’s like our ancestors) when she lived in CA. You can get her SS5 application if you are so inclined. I chose not to spend the $35 for that document but you can go to Ancestry.com and order the SS5 there easily enough.

—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —   Two more images of Alice O’Connor (Ayn Rand) :

IndexCard_AliceO'Connor USNatlIndex_AliceOConnor

August 30, 2013

Gesher Galicia — Tabula Register — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish, #Ukrainian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GesherGaliciaGesher Galicia has really been adding content and also a website redesign of late. I am planning on joining this genealogical society. The reason is their projects and current databases, maps, and variety of resources that can aid all genealogists and especially Jewish Genealogists with family from the former Galicia region (now western part in Poland, eastern part in Ukraine) of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire (aka Hapsburg). So Ukrainian and Polish genealogists take note!

This little tidbit was found because of a PGSCT&NE posting in Twitter/Facebook. So keeping tabs on events in social media (or reading this blog) can keep you informed on the latest contributions by genealogists, the world over. Follow these societies and join them and volunteer your time. I am sure Gesher Galicia members knew about this and active meeting goers may have been informed, but it is now the Internet/Cloud that keeps the vast majority of genealogists informed and involved. Keep up the good work!

The Gesher Galicia website has an article by Alexander Dunai. Alexander also has another, more complete article on his website which you should go read ( http://alexdunai.com/documents/item_11/) on Tabula Registers and their purpose, plus a list of towns is available with this genealogy resource at URL:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/galitzianer/tabula-registers-an-untapped-genealogical-resource-in-the-lviv-archives/

The list of towns from that article with Tabula Registers for the Villages and Towns of Galicia:

 Bandrow  Bania Kotowska  Belz (15 vols)
 Berwinkowa  Bialoberezka  Bialogora
 Bialy Kamien  Blyszczywody (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Bolechow
 Bolehowce  Brody (32 vols, 1794-1884)  Bronica
 Brzegi Dolne  Brzezany (12 vols)  Buda (incl. in Wysoka)
 Busk (5 vols)  Cholojow  Chorocowa
 Chyrow  Czajkowice  Dobra
 Dobrohostow  Dobromyl (16 vols)  Dobrzanica (incl. in Uszkowice)
Dolhopol  Dolina (10 vols)  Dolina area villages (incl. in Lopianka)
 Drohobycz & suburbs (81 vols)  Dunajow vicinity villages
 Dynow (3 books, 1780-1825)
 Engelsbruk  Falkenberg  Falkenstein
 Folwarki Wielke & Folwarki Male  Gaje Starobrodskie  Gerynia (incl. in Witwica)
 Gleboka  Gliniany (8 volumes)  Grodek Jagiellonski (11 volumes 1797-1880)
 Halicz (10 vols. 1753-1886)  Holowy  Hoszow
 Hoszow (incl. in Stankowce)  Hrusatycze (incl. in Strzeliska)  Hubice
 Huczko  Jagielnica  Jaroslaw (50 vols. 1792-1892)
 Jasien  Jasienica  Jasienica Solna
 Jaworow (9 vols. 1792-1893)  Jozefow  Kalusz (7 vols. 1758-1822)
 Kamionka Strumilowa (21 books)  Katyna  Kimirz
 Kniahinin (4 vols. 1801-1885)  Kniazpol  Kobasz
 Kolomyja (30 volumes)  Kolpiec  Komarno
 Korostow  Kotacin  Krakowiec
 Krasnoila  Krechow  Kropiwnik Nowy & Stary
 Krystynopol (7 vols. 1792-1883)  Kulczyce  Kulikow
 Kurowice  Kuty (18 vols, 1781-1888)  Kwaszenina
 Lacke  Liskowate  Liszczyny
 Lisznia  Lopianka  Lodyna
 Lopuszanka  Lopusznica  Lubycza Krolewska
 Makow  Mariampol (3 vols, 1807-1855)  Migowo
 Mizun  Modrycz  Mokrotyn
 Mokrotyn, Smerekow, Przedrzymichy, & Blyszczywody  Muzylowice  Nadziejow (incl. in Lopianka)
 Nahujowice  Nanow  Narajow
 Neudorf (incl. in Bolechowce)  Niedwedza  Nojdorf (incl. in Zawidowice)
 Nowe Miasto (1 volume)  Obersdorf  Olesko (3 vols, 1798-1882)
 Orow  Paprotno  Plebania
 Polana  Potylicz  Powitno
 Prochnik (14 vols, 1814-1874)  Przerzymichy (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Przemysl with suburbs (56 vols, 1799-1894)
 Przemyslany (11 vols, 1816-1881)  Radziechow (2 vols, 1827-1874)  Raniowice
 Rawa Ruska (12 vols, 1796-1882)  Rodatycze  Rogozno
 Rozenburg  Rozen Maly and Rozen Wielki  Roztoki
 Roztoczki (incl. in Witwica)  Rudawka  Rudki (4 vols)
 Rybno with Slobodka  Rybotycze  Rymanow with neighboring villages (6 vols, 1782-1888)
 Sambor & neighboring villages (69 volumes)  Sielec  Smereczna
 Smerekov (incl.  Mokrotyn)  Slobodka  Smolnica
 Smolno  Sniatyn (vols, 1791-1832)  Sokal (vols. with index)
 Solec  Sopotnik  Stainfeld
 Stanila with Stebnik and Kolpets  Stanislawow & suburbs (99 vols. 1784-1882)  Stankowce with Hoszow
 Stare Miasto  Stary Sambor  Starzawa Sanocka
 Stebne with Dolhopol  Stebnik  Strzeliska Nowe and Stare
 Sulukow (incl.  Lopianka)  Szmankowce  Tarnawa
 Tartakow (1 vol. 1817-1883)  Tarnopol city (50 vols.).  Trebowla (12 vols. 1803-1886)
 Truskawiec (incl. Tustanowice)  Tudiow  Tustanowice (1802-1889)
 Tyzlow  Uhnow  Ulyczno
 Untervalden (incl. in Uszkowice)  Ustrzyki Dolne (1855-1880)  Uszkowice
 Warez  Wierzblany  Witkow Nowy
 Witwica incl. Roztoczki & Gerynia  Wojnilow (3 vols, 1652-1839)  Wolica
 Wysocko  Wysoka & Buda  Wyzniany & vicinity
 Zablotow (3 vols)  Zaleszczyki (4 vols)  Zawidowice & Nojdorf
 Zbadyn  Zbaraz (8 vols)  Zloczow (50 vols)
 Zolkiew (24 vols)  Zoltantce  Zurawno (2 vols)
 Zydaczow (8 vols)

Thank You

Thank you, Alexander Dunai,  for this fine piece of research. I will be visiting your website and taking a further look at your other efforts too. Very nice website!

August 24, 2013

From The Mailbag … — #Genealogy, #Royalty, #Polish, #Szlachta

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

From the Post Office Department

From the Post Office Department

The minions in the Email-Room dropped off a missive at my virtual cubicle today. Today’s question is about Polish Royalty & DNA as it relates to genealogy …

Hi, I stumbled across your blog and thought you might could help me. We are searching for my father’s ancestry and think he is a Poniatowski. My grandfather Andrzej changed his name when he came to America in 1909. The story we always heard was that he was royal. So I have my father’s yDNA markers but cannot find a surname project online for the Poniatowskis or other Polish nobles. Do you know of any? Maybe you can give me some advice? I sure would appreciate it! Thanks in advance for sharing anything.
Sincerely,
Kristian Krawford
—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —

Kristian,

Welcome to the blog. DNA plays a role in genealogy in some ways, but it is NOT for every genealogist. It is due the certainty factor (I favor >97% certainty) takes you back beyond the number of generations that most people tracing Slavic/Polish genealogy can do UNLESS they have royal blood. Your question gives me yet another reason to endorse limited use of DNA in genealogy. I am in favor of using DNA in your case because, you want to determine if you have royal blood or not and specifically whether or not you are related to Poniatowski szlactha (nobility).

Now to the crux of your question. You have your family DNA and want to compare it. Ancestry.com has some capacity, but perhaps because they have so little Polish emphasis in their data, their DNA may be lacking from Polish genealogists families. So…

You can Google:  

  Y-DNA project of Polish Nobility families 

That led me to:

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/polish/default.aspx?section=ysnp

This web page had a very extensive list of family names with their DNA markers. I hope you can find your markers in these that are available. Notice that is “Y-DNA”. The mt-DNA will not work for you as that is the maternal/mitochondrial DNA that is passed from Mother to all children (relatively unchanged, except by mutation) and the Y-DNA is the paternal DNA passed from father to sons (23rd chromosome). The rest of the DNA is called autosomal / atDNA (see  Genealogical DNA test). This link is a good link for introduction of DNA terms to the genealogist.

Good Luck!

Stanczyk

August 22, 2013

#Meme — Things I Find Whilst Looking Up Other Things — #Genealogy, #Art, #GettyMuseum

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

DukeLudiwg_I_01

The Getty Museum released on 14th-August-2013 over 4,000 images into public domain (i.e. free). According to the ArtObserved article on the museum’s  public release made public on their Getty Iris blog, this is part of their, “Open Content” commitment of their digital resources.

You can search these images using:  Getty Search Gateway .

Stanczyk, knows what you’re thinking, “I am too busy on my genealogy to search through museum images”. But I politely urge you to reconsider. While I was searching their images, I found a genealogical family tree, of Duke Ludwig I of Brzeg (amongst many other images he commissioned). A Polish noble of house Piast. So if your family tree intersects, get thee to the Getty Museum. For those curious, I have posted the images to this blog. The text is Fraktur looking, gothic, German script.

.

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Other Duke Ludwik I, Family Tree Images …

DukeLudiwg_I_02 DukeLudiwg_I_03

August 11, 2013

Pacanów Pomoc – #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy this past week with Oracle 12c (database) !   So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my genealogy.

I have analyzed the data from GENEALODZY.PL in their GENESZUKACZ database for Pacanów Births (1875-1908). So now I need some help (pomoc). In my notes column I have noted the ELIASZ that I have in my family  -or- my guess. The empty notes fields are ELIASZ that I need help with. If you are a genealogist with these people in your family tree then please email me your info and if possible any images of church records or family photos.

 

Year

/ Rok

Rec#

/ Akt

Imię Nazwisko    NOTES
1 1875 110  Wacław Eliasz in my tree; son of Wojciech Eliasz & Agnieszka Pyszkow; [image]
2 1876 109  Marianna Eliasz daughter of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
3 1878 59  Katarzyna Eliasz
4 1879 20  Roman Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
5 1880 52  Jan Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
6 1880 160  Jan Eliasz My grand-uncle Jan; son of Jozef Eliasz & Marianna Paluch
7 1881 28  Jan Eliasz Martin Eliasz’s  (& Julianna Odomski) son
8 1881 30  Julianna Eliasz
9 1881 130  Tomasz Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
10 1882 128  Wincenty Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
11 1882 157  Marianna Eliasz Martin’s  (Julianna Odomski) daughter
12 1882 185  Katarzyna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
13 1883 25  Roman Eliasz
14 1884 33  Apolonia Eliasz Martin’s daughter
15 1884 71  Marianna Eliasz
16 1885 46  Józef Eliasz My Grandfather; Have Birth Record
17 1885 125  Marianna Eliasz
18 1886 189  Jan Eliasz
19 1886 238  Szczepan Eliasz
20 1888 104  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
21 1888 123  Teofila Eliasz
22 1889 71  Józefa Eliasz
23 1889 109  Antoni Eliasz ??possibly son of Ludwik & Elzbieta  M.
24 1890 24  Katarzyna Eliasz
25 1890 149  Marianna Eliasz
26 1890 181  Stanisław Eliasz Martin’s son, dies in Detroit (Stanislaw Elyasz in October 1923)
27 1891 186  Stanisław Eliasz
28 1891 190  Franciszka Eliasz
29 1892 68  Wincenty Eliasz
30 1892 83  Władysław Eliasz My Grand-Uncle
31 1892 206  Marianna Eliasz
32 1893 143  Anna Eliasz
33 1893 237  Marianna Eliasz
34 1893 261  Agnieszka Eliasz ??? Agnieszka Marianna E. that marries S. Hajek (Cleveland) ???
35 1895 30  Marianna Eliasz
36 1895 230  Tomasz Eliasz My Grand-Uncle (Dorota’s grandfather); Have birth record
37 1896 164  Wacław Eliasz
38 1897 8  Julianna Eliasz
39 1897 236  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
40 1898 103  Anna Eliasz
41 1899 63  Balbina Eliasz
42 1899 79  Zygmunt Eliasz ??? Zygmunt Elijasz son Jozef E. & Theresa Siwiec??? PROBABLY not since Zygmunt was born in Biechow in 1898 (April 19)
43 1899 185  Aleksander Eliasz
44 1900 163  Julianna Eliasz
45 1901 84  Marcin Eliasz
46 1901 100  Anna Eliasz
47 1901 161  Marianna Eliasz
48 1901 164  Martin Eliasz
49 1903 95  Stanisława Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
50 1903 112  Helena Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
51 1903 175  Janina Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
52 1905 96  Julianna Eliasz
53 1906 71  Wojciech Eliasz
54 1906 77  Stanisław Eliasz
55 1906 141  Edward,Jan Eliasz son of Jan Eliasz  & Pelagia z Kedzierski ?
56 1907 11  Julian Eliasz
57 1908 67  Kazimiera Eliasz
58 1908 124  Michalina Eliasz
May 23, 2013

Who Do You Think You Are — @TLC

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Every genealogist I know watches #WDYTYA . So for all our sakes, I am glad that the @LisaKudrow Program was picked up for a 4th season; This time on @TLC starting 23-July-2013.

Genealogy Subjects:

Chelsea Handler,    Kelly Clarkson,        Zooey Deschanel,

Cindy Crawford,    Christina Applegate,   Chris O’Donnell, plus two more ?

April 23, 2013

FamilySearch Indexing: They Reached A Billion

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

FamilySearch Indexing reached their first billion records online. Congratulations FamilySearch!

logo.gif FamilySearch Indexing: Thanks A Billionopen.aspx?ffcb10-fe561074726701757613-fde81c797d6506787c167670-fe6315707166057a711d-fe5a17707266007a701d-fe2c13767767017b761770-ffcf14&d=10026

Thanks A Billion

The winners
Thank you for contributing to the billion! We did it! We reached a major milestone of one billion records indexed and arbitrated since the launch of FamilySearch indexing in September of 2006. We are grateful for the many volunteers who dedicate their time and efforts to make these records freely available for online research. Languages

Deutsch Italiano
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日本語 Polski
Nederlands Svenska

BillionsBadge_EN.pngKenneth B. (California, United States), Brittney S. (Idaho, United States), and April R. (Alberta, Canada) were the lucky ones to index and arbitrate the billionth record! They will receive a FamilySearch backpack stuffed with FamilySearch goodies. We also want to thank all the volunteers who have contributed to the billion records with a FamilySearch indexing badge. You can download your free badge at https://familysearch.org/node/2113.

It took us seven years to reach the first billion. How long do you think it will take us to reach the next billion? The advances of technology and the dedication of our volunteers have increased the speed in which we can process and deliver records for publication. Join the global effort to make the next billion records available for family history research. Start indexing now! familysearch.org/indexing

Sincerely,

FamilySearch indexing

FamilySearch.org is the largest free collection of online resources for family history research. With billions of historical records, powerful search tools, family trees, and an active community, FamilySearch.org helps everyone discover, preserve, and share their family history.You received this message because you are a registered volunteer with FamilySearch indexing, signed up to receive e-mails, or received this as a forward. The original was sent to mike.

If you have questions, comments, or concerns, please contact FamilySearch at support.

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I have been an intermittent contributor to this and other genealogy indexing projects. Doing RAOGK helps others and because of the interconnectedness of our family trees, it may ultimately help our own families. Congratulations again to FamilySearch!

April 14, 2013

A Church Register Novelty in Koprzywnica — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poland_1807_1815_AnnotatedIn another case of finding something interesting whilst researching something else, I found a type of Church Register Index that I have not seen before in any other parish. So today’s blog is about that novel index I found. See the Church Register in the picture (see below).

Dateline Koprzywnica parish, 1810 – In what was after the 3rd partition was Austrian-Hungarian territory (Austrian-Poland in green), has now been annexed by Napoleon in 1809 into the Duchy of Warsaw and in another five years will be Congress Poland (Vistulaland, Russian-Poland). But in 1810 we are speaking of Koprzywnica in the powiat of Staszow and the Departement of Radom. No, that is not wojewodztwo — it is the French, Departement that is the highest level of administration in the Duchy of Warsaw. The map shows that a huge swath of green from the  Austrian-Poland partition (zabior) was annexed into the Duchy in 1809. Stanczyk’s own ancestors once again switched Empires from Austria to France. So too did the citizens of Koprzywnica (and a great many cities, towns, and villages). Poof, now the records go from Latin, in the perfunctory Latin Box (Table) Format to the lingua franca of Polish paragraph with French-style two witnesses.

So Koprzywnica, like Stanczyk’s own ancestral Villages (Biechów and Pacanów) was briefly Austrian, then French (very briefly), then Russian until 1917-1918 whence it became just Poland again. We can find Koprzywnica in the gazetteer, Skorowidz Miejscowoscy Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej as being in the powiat Sandomierz, wojewowdztwo Kielce (circa 1920’s/1930’s).

Indexes are so very helpful. It is always a let down when a parish book or a year within the book lacks any kind of index. That means I will have to look at each and every record to see if any are related to me / my research. Early Latin paragraph form church records often do not have any index  — they barely denote the year change. So that means you have to read each and every badly handwritten paragraph of Latin — very rare to find a priest with good Latin handwriting. That is why the Latin Box Format was more welcome. At least I could find the pieces of info and the handwriting was less of an issue. But the Latin Box format did not have indexes either.

So it was helpful when Napoleon implemented the Codex Napoleon in the Duchy of Warsaw. So by 1810 you see the records written in Polish (lingua franca) in a paragraph form that is specified by the Codex Napoleon. And these new records have indexes!

OK, the indexes initially are by letter: A, B, C, …, Z. So you have just under 26 pages of indexes. It is an improvement. Quickly the church realizes it can save paper by running the index all together with all letters on a single (or a few) page(s) in order alphabetically. Very efficient to scan these indexes for your families. And it was also easy to spot when a priest added a late addition to the index at the back after all other names (even though it was evidently in the wrong spot lexicographically speaking).

OK 1868-1918, we find Russian / Cyrillic indexes. In addition to priests not knowing Russian well and ordering names phonetically before later on,  we find the index in Cyrillic proper lexical order you will have to scan carefully. Cyrillic kind of forces that to those of us weaned on a Latin alphabet. But you sometimes find the Russian indexes sorted in Cyrillic lexical order … by the first name ??? That is not very useful. Sometimes the index is in chronological order (akt # / record # order) making it barely more useful then scanning every record.

But when we find a well formed index (or a not so good index) it is always for one event: Birth/Christening, Marriage / Marriage Banns, Death Records. One index for Births, one for Marriages and one for Deaths … assuming none are missing, 3 indexes. That is what makes the following index so very interesting …

The Index (Skorowidz)

1810KoprzywnicaINDEX_pg4_JewishNames_righthalf This was supposed to be a Marriage Index !! But it was five scanned pages! This would have to be an extraordinarily large city to have that many marriages! What are all of those columns ?? That is what I asked myself.

Let’s see what those columns are:  Record # (Akt #), Village Name, Person Name(s), Births (Urodzin), Deaths (Zeyscie), Banns (Zapowiedz), and finally Marriages(Malzenstwa) Kart # (you can safely ignore). This index is an all event index. Births-Deaths-Banns-Marriages all interleaved. In fact, when I look at each event (B/M/D) I see the same 99 event-record pages and the same five index pages. It appears that all events are in the same register! This is rather unique — as I said previously I have not seen this before in other parish registers I have seen.

So in this “combo style” index (which needs a proper name) you cannot have a single name  for marriage record, so marriage records have two names (as usual), but this requires two lines in this style of index — since we are multi-columnar. We also see that Banns are indicated ‘I‘ or ‘II‘ — the third bann being the actual marriage itself. The Roman numeral written above the word Zapowiedz. So since the index is in Akt# order, it is a chronological order too. It could be interesting from a demographic perspective (what time of year do most marriages occur or  do a higher concentration of deaths occur in winter months). If this style index had occurred during an epidemic year, then we could have seen all of the deaths occurring in a great streak without interruption by other events. 1810 in Koprzywnica was not such an epidemic year.

There is one more fascinating aspect to this index. In the Napoleonic era (1807 thru 1829) we find that Catholic priest acts as the civil administrator and that Jewish/Evangelic/Orthodox vital records are written in the Catholic register. How is this noted in the index — which again I have not seen elsewhere? Look at the scanned register image for this blog. Pay attention to Records #’s:

85, 86, and 91.

It so happens that each of these records is a Marriage Banns event type. But, notice that each begins ‘Zyda‘.  Żyd = Jew, hence Żyda is plural for Jews. Żydów = Jewish. This indicates that this is a Jewish civil record being recorded.  Now I know that Jewish vital records are recorded in the Napoleonic era Catholic registers. But it is unusual that it is indicated in the index (as opposed to being in the record itself).

So this was a very fascinating find after all. I was actually looking for a particular Leszczyński but I found a novel index and indeed a novel parish register overall.

Related Posts

The Fourth Partition (23 January 2013) – A Discussion of the Duchy of Warsaw, with a map

Historical Eras of Poland (21 January 2013) – A set of Stanczyk defined eras of Poland of particular use to genealogists. An historical definition of Poland’s eras (1569-present) based upon history’s impact on genealogical research.

 

Post Scriptum

The index from this column was found in the Polish website: genealodzy.pl (PTG) of which I written many times before. Their METRYK project of scanned church books is where I found the 1810 Koprzywnica Index.

April 6, 2013

Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) — #Genealogy, #Jewish, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RemembranceHolocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) 2013 begins in the evening of: Sunday, April 7
and ends in the evening of: Monday, April 8. In the Hebrew Calendar is 27 Nisan (see Stephen Morse’s Jewish Calendar Conversion tool) is Yom HaShoah and varies in the Gregorian calendar across the Months of April/May.

To honor my wife Teréza and our children let me add a Jewish Genealogy blog post. It is for a Polish village in the AP Grodzisk (Warsaw, Blonie) and is called: Góra Kalwaria. Góra Kalwaria can be found in PRADZIAD database. What is great about this news is that there is yet another project beyond the ones I have previously written about (SzukachwArchiwum.pl and Metryk in PTG). This village and its images can be found in: Metryki.GenBaza.pl (AP Gordzisk) for :

This is just one of many congregations (Catholic & Jewish) that they have scanned. There appear to be about 110 villages in total so far this Polish National Archive in Grodzisk (a branch office of Warsaw).  I picked this village because it is all about the Jewish congregation (that I provided the Pradziad link for). The records run from 1826 – 1910 inclusive and there no missing years. This is a remarkably complete/intact record of a Jewish congregation in Poland. The scanned records from 1826-1867 are written in Polish and then starting in 1868 the records are written in Russian all the way through 1910.

So for the Jewish-Polish genealogists who read this blog, here is a treasure trove to research. In actuality, many of the 110 villages have Jewish records. Look for the abbreviation ‘moj’ (short for mojżeszowe). So I hope this is a joyful news for the remembrance of this solemn occasion.

Good genealogy to all my readers!

–Stanczyk

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April 1, 2013

World Backup Day

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1 April 2013 – Dateline Philadelphia

Yes, this jester knows its April Fool’s day; But who better than a jester to speak truth to the people (uh … genealogists, librarians, archivists, & researchers) on this day? The first of April has become the impetus for backup and preservation.

20130401-051142.jpg

You need only look at today’s world of crazy dictators or Mali terrorists to see that cultural/historical artifacts can disappear in an instant. Cyberwarfare can claim your harddisk. The cloud could crash or hurricane Sandy can happen (please donate to Ellis island Foundation to help in that restoration effort). Libraries and Archives need to safeguard your artifacts too! Are you motivated yet? Good!

There are backup solutions, including some free options to the “cloud”. Apple even provides a free 5GB iCloud. So save your GEDCOM file. If you still have free space then backup pictures or scans that are CRITICAL. You can save/backup to media: CDs, USB thumb drives, etc. But be aware that backup to electronic media needs to be refreshed yearly to avoid stranding your backups on outmoded technology (i.e. 8Track tapes or even floppy disks).

Be careful out there and have a Happy April Fool’s Day!

March 24, 2013

Gazetteers, Maps, and Genealogy — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Maps, #Gazetteer

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Block_Stanczyk, has been busy revisiting the Metryk (metrical, vital records) images from genealodzy.pl of the various parishes/synagogues [hereafter I just use ‘parish’ as shorthand for ‘parish/synagogue’]. As my blog, Waiting For Polish Archives 2.4 M Scans (March 18th, 2013), indicated, I have been exhausting the possibilities for Biechow & Zborowek parishes in the Buski (Busko-Zdroj) powiat. The images are clearer, so I am replacing my existing images with these much better images. In some cases, I have found that the images of the Polish paragraph format provide me with additional details over what may have been available via only a Latin Box format copy that I might have previously had. At the very least, I have corrected a few mistakes of translation due to unreadable portions from prior microfilm I have read from/taken pictures of. So I strongly encourage others to make this effort.

I have been using the Metryk database and looking at the images/scans. Sometimes you have to look at dozens of images because there is NO index. But most of the collection (post 1812) have indexes. If you see SKU (that means index/skorowidz of births/urodziny), likewise  for SKM (for marriage), and SKZ (for death) indexes. Sometimes indexes spread across multiple pages, so you may see SK1, SKa (names begining with the letter ‘A’) or SKU1, etc. SO use these indexes to look for your family names, then just load up the scan of the akt (record) number for your ancestor — no need to search  through a multitude of images.

I have also used Geneszukacz as another kind of index to search for family names. These indexes are nice because I can catch ancestors getting married (or dying or giving birth) in another parish that I might not have known to check. If this previously unknown parish is one that has scans, then I go directly to the year/event for that parish and go to the akt specified in Geneszukacz!

So that is all great and I exhort you to do this.

But these new, previously unknown parishes. Where are they? How far away from the ancestral village are they? That is when I need a gazetteer (check out Stanczyk’s Gazetter page) or a map. If you have not been to the Polish War Map Archive (Archiwum Map Wojskowego), then today’s blog is your reason to do so. I have a map on my wall of my ancestral villages. The map’s name is: STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32. In fact, I use their MAP INDEX, 1:100,000 scale map tiled in squares (http://igrek.amzp.pl/mapindex.php?cat=WIG100). Please NOTE these map images are from about 4MB to 7MB in size. Make sure you are at a Free WiFi cafe where you can use a high-speed and the large band-width for the map images you download.

When you see, PAS think ROW and when you see SLUP think COLUMN. This is a big Cartesian Grid (or computer types can think 2d-array). It turns out that STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32 has: Biechow, Pacanow, Ksiaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Szczucin, Beszowa, Olesnica, and STOPNICA. In fact, that one map has many more parishes than those that I enumerated. I have a small snippet of the Map Index below (you can click on the image and it will take you to the actual map index):

MapIndex_MapyWig

So I found an ELIJASZ ancestor in Koniemloty parish getting married, who was from PACANOW parish. Now from the Metryk web app, I knew Koniemloty was in STASZOW powiat. So I go to the Map Index and look at the grid near STOPNICA (P47_S32) and voila, STASZOW is the box due north of STOPNICA in PAS46_SLUP32. If you cannot locate you powiat that way, then you must drop back to MAPA.SZUKACZ.pl (an interactive map that I have raved about before) and look for KONIEMLOTY (do not need to use diacriticals) to get the relative feel that it is north or east (or north-east). So any way, STASZOW_PAS46_SLUP32 is the map for KONIEMLOTY parish. Notice PAS46 is one row less than PAS47 (of STOPNICA). PAS decreasing is going north, PAS increasing is going south. Going east from STASZOW, we see the SLUP increases to SLUP33  (SANDOMIERZ) or going west the SLUP decreases to SLUP31 (PINCZOW). So now you can now work  with the Map Index using the cardinal directions by adding/subtracting to/from the rows/columns.

P.S. Since this is the Passover (Pesach) / Easter (Wielkanoc) season, let me honor my wife (Tereza) by pointing out that her paternal grandfather, Benjamin Solomon, had as a birth village, Proskuriw (aka PŁOSKIRÓW, Хмельницький/Khmelnitski — now in Modern Ukraine). This village is shown in the lower right-hand corner of my map snippet (PAS51_SLUP44).

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