Archive for ‘Jewish’

July 2, 2015

Sir Nicholas Winton Dies — Hero of #WWII #Genealogy #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

wintonNicholas Winton, MBE — born 19 May 1909, died 1 July 2015 . Obituary: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11711344/Sir-Nicholas-Winton-humanitarian-obituary.html  [please read]

Stanczyk took note of the passing of Sir Nicholas Winton. Sir Nicholas saved 669 children, [Complete List] from Czechoslovakia most of whom were Jewish from Nazi death camps. There are now over 6,000 living people as a result Winton’s heroism. Follow the above link to see the names / pictures of who Winton saved.

Winton died 1st-July-2015 at the age of 106. He was often called the British Schindler for his work. He might have been forgotten but his wife, Grete. She remembered a photo album of names & pictures of the children Sir Nicholas saved during the war.

His website: nicholaswinton.com lists the children and so much more from his noble life.

 

See More: [bing results]: http://www.bing.com/search?q=sir+nicholas+winton&qs=HS&pq=sir&sc=8-3&sp=1&cvid=8f5e0705da8c428a963e1354afe27ef0&FORM=QBLH


 

 

May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


 

Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:

Pacanow_16thCentury_Boundaries

The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.

Toolbar

For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.


March 15, 2015

Metryki.GenBaza.pl – What’s Happening in March ? – #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Parafia Michałów

Michałów

Stanczyk wanted to check-in on GenBaza and what has been going on for the old Wojewodztwo/Gubernia Kielce.

Thank You Kornelia! So here are the GenBaza updates:

2015-03-15

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parish, [sfotografowała parafię]
Michałów (1711-1904) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym].

2015-03-14

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Orthodox parishes, [sfotografowała parafię prawosławne]
Miechów (1892-1912) and also
Nowe Brzesko (1906-1908) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

2015-03-12

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the Jewish congregation in, [sfotografowała parafie]
Sobków_moj (1810, 1826-1912) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

2015-03-11

— in AP Kielce Kornelia photographed the parishes, [sfotografowała parafie]
Waśniów (1890-1910) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym] and also
Wiślica Gmina (1755-1825) and ready for indexing [i udostępnia indeksującym]

December 10, 2014

James Carroll – “Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age.” #Book

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

It is the Holiday Season. Hanukah is coming and this year leads right into Christmas Eve. So Stanczyk thinks a blog connected with the religious underpinnings of this time of year is a good idea.

Pocket : Jesus and the Modern Man

Also, from NYT:

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/11/09/opinion/sunday/can-i-stay-with-the-church.html?smid=tw-share&_r=1&referrer=

I found James Carroll speaking on NPR radio. He has the above named book out now and was making the rounds. However, this jester found Mr. Carroll to be a thoroughly knowledgeable Theologian.

Many of the topics that were raised by the NPR host (RadioTimes – Marty Moss-CoaneShow Broadcast – have a listen !!) were so interesting and invited the listener to think more deeply. Some of Mr. Carroll’s answers, made me so want to have a long discussion with him about his book.

I see he was also speaking at our Philadelphia Free Library last night too.

The Book can be found on Amazon. I am adding it to my Wish List.

#Theologian

October 25, 2014

Family History Library – Teaches Russian Handwriting Classes — #Genealogy #Polish #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Waleria Leszczynska

If your family originates from Poland, … the partition that was under Russian Empire rule:

  • Eastern Poland
  • Ukraine
  • Belarus
  • Lithuania
  • The Jewish Pale
  • Western Russia (formerly Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth)
  • Modern day Russian Federation or other former Russian Empire territories

then you need to be aware that the Family History Library has developed and will be teaching a class in Reading Russian Handwriting (and Printing) this November. It is a four-part class and open to all for free. Each class is two hours long.

The dates are Wednesdays:  November  5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th in classroom B2 starting at 2:00pm  (MT). 8 Hours of free Russian Handwriting instruction.

Classes will be taught by Dennis Everett .

For more details, see the FamilySearch Blog .

 

Stanczyk hopes the classes will be videotaped and posted on the Internet for those of us unable to go to Salt Lake City, UT this November [2014].

Family History Library can you make this a podcast or iTunes Class for downloading?


 

April 20, 2014

Genealogy Indexer – Logan Kleinwak — #Genealogy, #Historical, #Directories

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Recently, while Stanczyk was on Twitter, I saw that  Logan Kleinwak (Genealogy Indexer / @gindexer) was again busy,  very busy.  Perhaps you do not remember that his website: http://genealogyindexer.org , publishes Historical Directories, Yizkor Books, Military Lists, etc.

GenealogyIndexer_2

What I noticed besides he was very busy indexing things and putting them online for searches is two things:

  1. In my 1st thought I noticed, “Collections” (each a menu to a page of resource links)
  2. My 2nd thought was Logan added a Latin-to-Cyrillic feature

I do not mention his excellent little piece of code to implement a keyboard for implementing whatever language’s special characters that are a might difficult to type on American keyboards. That I posted about before.

The Collection  I searched was “Directories”  and I saw:

Obviously this is the Gubernia of my paternal ancestors. So I was excited and I knew it was in Russian (i.e. Cyrillic characters) — a challenge.  AH, … now we see the need for the 2nd thoughtful feature, ‘Add Latin->Cyrillic’. This feature automatically adds the equivalent Cyrillic characters to the Latin characters you are searching for, in order to locate the equivalent, transliterated string in the Russian Directories. That is well thought out! Indeed Genius!

So my thanks to Logan for his fine piece of programming and history/genealogy indexing that he has done. If you have not done so, you owe it to yourself and your research to check out Genealogy Indexer. Add it to your social network (Facebook and Twitter) and bookmark the website in your browser.

 

 

Related Blog Articles …

03-May-2012 — Genealogy Indexer – Logan Kleinwak 

28 Feb 2012 — Dying for Diacriticals – Beyond ASCII

15 Jun 2011 —  Polish Genealogy – Useful Websites …

 

February 28, 2014

GenBaza — Jewish Congregations (AP Kielce, AP Sandomierz) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been writing about metryki.genbaza.pl a lot this year and this week in particular. Since I wrote my guide on using GenBaza, I thought I might start enumerating what is actually in GenBaza. So to honor my wife, I thought I would start with the Jewish records.

I compiled my list from two of the archives that I dabble in: AP Kielce and AP Sandomierz.  This roughly covers the area that a genealogy group on the Internet known as KR SIG/ Kielce-Radom Special Interest Group (are they defunct now?  — see JewishGen/JRI-Poland have their materials) used to do research on.

Today’s blog is almost a Wordless Friday blog. I see from the embedded pictures (below) that AP Kielce has 10 congregations data and AP Sanodmierz has 13.KielceRadom

AP_Kielce_mojAP_Sandomierz_moj

September 14, 2013

Ayn Rand – Alice O’Connor – Alicia Rosenbaum — #Russian, #Jewish, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

AynRanOConnor_PetitionCitz_page1

AynRanOConnor_PetitionCitz_page2

In Stanczyk’s first genealogical examination on Ayn Rand’s genealogy:

 Ayn Rand – A Genealogical Examination — 15th-August-2012

I omitted publishing her citizenship papers, which I am now including in this article.

“Alice” applied for citizenship on 29th June 1929. She declared herself to be a Hebrew (i.e. that she was Jewish), not Russian. She also said she emigrated from Mexico (clearly a lie) and that her last residence was Petrograd, Russia. Her occupation was ‘clerk’.

I say clearly a lie, since her Ship Manifest that records her REAL arrival on, 19-Feb-1926 as Alice Rosenbaum  arriving in New York City, NY on board the SS De Grasse. I just wanted to emphasize that she was a liar on numerous occasions when it suited her purposes. So I guess I can conclude that Objectivism includes a tenant of lying  — tough to base a philosophy/economic theory on lies. That is not intellectualism, that is an academic fraud.

On March 13, 1931 she was granted citizenship. You can see her citizenship is 5 years after her REAL arrival.  So what was June 29th, 1929 if not an arrival date?  It was a return from her honeymoon vacation! Do you see how she twists things to suit her purposes?

In the original article I did mention that she collected Social Security & Medicare to pay for her lung cancer surgery & medical bills. I forgot to mention that she had applied for Social Security before 1951 (probably in the  1930’s like our ancestors) when she lived in CA. You can get her SS5 application if you are so inclined. I chose not to spend the $35 for that document but you can go to Ancestry.com and order the SS5 there easily enough.

—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —   Two more images of Alice O’Connor (Ayn Rand) :

IndexCard_AliceO'Connor USNatlIndex_AliceOConnor

August 30, 2013

Gesher Galicia — Tabula Register — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Jewish, #Ukrainian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GesherGaliciaGesher Galicia has really been adding content and also a website redesign of late. I am planning on joining this genealogical society. The reason is their projects and current databases, maps, and variety of resources that can aid all genealogists and especially Jewish Genealogists with family from the former Galicia region (now western part in Poland, eastern part in Ukraine) of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire (aka Hapsburg). So Ukrainian and Polish genealogists take note!

This little tidbit was found because of a PGSCT&NE posting in Twitter/Facebook. So keeping tabs on events in social media (or reading this blog) can keep you informed on the latest contributions by genealogists, the world over. Follow these societies and join them and volunteer your time. I am sure Gesher Galicia members knew about this and active meeting goers may have been informed, but it is now the Internet/Cloud that keeps the vast majority of genealogists informed and involved. Keep up the good work!

The Gesher Galicia website has an article by Alexander Dunai. Alexander also has another, more complete article on his website which you should go read ( http://alexdunai.com/documents/item_11/) on Tabula Registers and their purpose, plus a list of towns is available with this genealogy resource at URL:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/galitzianer/tabula-registers-an-untapped-genealogical-resource-in-the-lviv-archives/

The list of towns from that article with Tabula Registers for the Villages and Towns of Galicia:

 Bandrow  Bania Kotowska  Belz (15 vols)
 Berwinkowa  Bialoberezka  Bialogora
 Bialy Kamien  Blyszczywody (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Bolechow
 Bolehowce  Brody (32 vols, 1794-1884)  Bronica
 Brzegi Dolne  Brzezany (12 vols)  Buda (incl. in Wysoka)
 Busk (5 vols)  Cholojow  Chorocowa
 Chyrow  Czajkowice  Dobra
 Dobrohostow  Dobromyl (16 vols)  Dobrzanica (incl. in Uszkowice)
Dolhopol  Dolina (10 vols)  Dolina area villages (incl. in Lopianka)
 Drohobycz & suburbs (81 vols)  Dunajow vicinity villages
 Dynow (3 books, 1780-1825)
 Engelsbruk  Falkenberg  Falkenstein
 Folwarki Wielke & Folwarki Male  Gaje Starobrodskie  Gerynia (incl. in Witwica)
 Gleboka  Gliniany (8 volumes)  Grodek Jagiellonski (11 volumes 1797-1880)
 Halicz (10 vols. 1753-1886)  Holowy  Hoszow
 Hoszow (incl. in Stankowce)  Hrusatycze (incl. in Strzeliska)  Hubice
 Huczko  Jagielnica  Jaroslaw (50 vols. 1792-1892)
 Jasien  Jasienica  Jasienica Solna
 Jaworow (9 vols. 1792-1893)  Jozefow  Kalusz (7 vols. 1758-1822)
 Kamionka Strumilowa (21 books)  Katyna  Kimirz
 Kniahinin (4 vols. 1801-1885)  Kniazpol  Kobasz
 Kolomyja (30 volumes)  Kolpiec  Komarno
 Korostow  Kotacin  Krakowiec
 Krasnoila  Krechow  Kropiwnik Nowy & Stary
 Krystynopol (7 vols. 1792-1883)  Kulczyce  Kulikow
 Kurowice  Kuty (18 vols, 1781-1888)  Kwaszenina
 Lacke  Liskowate  Liszczyny
 Lisznia  Lopianka  Lodyna
 Lopuszanka  Lopusznica  Lubycza Krolewska
 Makow  Mariampol (3 vols, 1807-1855)  Migowo
 Mizun  Modrycz  Mokrotyn
 Mokrotyn, Smerekow, Przedrzymichy, & Blyszczywody  Muzylowice  Nadziejow (incl. in Lopianka)
 Nahujowice  Nanow  Narajow
 Neudorf (incl. in Bolechowce)  Niedwedza  Nojdorf (incl. in Zawidowice)
 Nowe Miasto (1 volume)  Obersdorf  Olesko (3 vols, 1798-1882)
 Orow  Paprotno  Plebania
 Polana  Potylicz  Powitno
 Prochnik (14 vols, 1814-1874)  Przerzymichy (incl. in Mokrotyn)  Przemysl with suburbs (56 vols, 1799-1894)
 Przemyslany (11 vols, 1816-1881)  Radziechow (2 vols, 1827-1874)  Raniowice
 Rawa Ruska (12 vols, 1796-1882)  Rodatycze  Rogozno
 Rozenburg  Rozen Maly and Rozen Wielki  Roztoki
 Roztoczki (incl. in Witwica)  Rudawka  Rudki (4 vols)
 Rybno with Slobodka  Rybotycze  Rymanow with neighboring villages (6 vols, 1782-1888)
 Sambor & neighboring villages (69 volumes)  Sielec  Smereczna
 Smerekov (incl.  Mokrotyn)  Slobodka  Smolnica
 Smolno  Sniatyn (vols, 1791-1832)  Sokal (vols. with index)
 Solec  Sopotnik  Stainfeld
 Stanila with Stebnik and Kolpets  Stanislawow & suburbs (99 vols. 1784-1882)  Stankowce with Hoszow
 Stare Miasto  Stary Sambor  Starzawa Sanocka
 Stebne with Dolhopol  Stebnik  Strzeliska Nowe and Stare
 Sulukow (incl.  Lopianka)  Szmankowce  Tarnawa
 Tartakow (1 vol. 1817-1883)  Tarnopol city (50 vols.).  Trebowla (12 vols. 1803-1886)
 Truskawiec (incl. Tustanowice)  Tudiow  Tustanowice (1802-1889)
 Tyzlow  Uhnow  Ulyczno
 Untervalden (incl. in Uszkowice)  Ustrzyki Dolne (1855-1880)  Uszkowice
 Warez  Wierzblany  Witkow Nowy
 Witwica incl. Roztoczki & Gerynia  Wojnilow (3 vols, 1652-1839)  Wolica
 Wysocko  Wysoka & Buda  Wyzniany & vicinity
 Zablotow (3 vols)  Zaleszczyki (4 vols)  Zawidowice & Nojdorf
 Zbadyn  Zbaraz (8 vols)  Zloczow (50 vols)
 Zolkiew (24 vols)  Zoltantce  Zurawno (2 vols)
 Zydaczow (8 vols)

Thank You

Thank you, Alexander Dunai,  for this fine piece of research. I will be visiting your website and taking a further look at your other efforts too. Very nice website!

June 2, 2013

Polish Vital Records On-line — A Survey #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Metryka_Urodzenia_Births

Stanczyk is a bit uncertain. It seems like every day there are some new vital records indexes or even actual register scans themselves made available from congregations all over the Central European — Jewish, Catholic (Roman & Greek), Orthodox, Lutheran/Evangelical lands that make up Poland or a land that was once within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the 1st Republic) or any of the variations between those times. So I thought I would step back and take stock of what was available. Yes, I know this will be out of date by tomorrow. But here is a quick & dirty, handy reference list of where to go looking. Clip & Save.

Cut— — — — — — — — — —

Poland – Archives & Genealogical Societies

AGAD Księgi metrykalne – Eastern Borderlands (Ukraine, Russia Jewish Pale, etc.) —

http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/testy.html

(scans by Sygn.: http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/KMLw301.html#idp1765776 )

Prussian Poland Parishes

BASIA – http://www.basia.famula.pl/en/ – State Archives in Poznan, the Wielkopolska Genealogical Society (WTG “Gniazdo”) project.

Poznan Marriage Project – http://poznan-project.psnc.pl/

Pomorskie Towarzstwo Genealogiczne – http://www.ptg.gda.pl/

All Poland & Eastern Borders (PTG)

GeneSzukacz  / Geneteka (indexes, some scans) –  http://www.geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl/      &      http://geneteka.genealodzy.pl/

METRYKI (parish register scans)– http://metryki.genealodzy.pl/

Szukajwarchiwach (Poland’s National Archives online) – http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/

This is the latest project and is shooting to have 5.8 Million records by the end June (this month) scanned and on-line by Polish Archive or National Museum.

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) – http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

The venerable project with new life provides indexes to registered users (free) and then you can purchase the actual church record. Great for Jewish Pale & Russian Poland, plus so much more.

Metryk.GenBaza.pl – http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,4,1 (AP GRODZISK). Archive in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Russian Poland parishes near Warsaw).

Family Search.Org 

Besides the 5 parishes below, you might want to have a look at holdings for:

Austria, Germany, Russia & Ukraine

Poland, Częstochowa Roman Catholic Church Books, 1873-1948 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Gliwice Roman Catholic Church Books, 1599-1976 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Lublin Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 99,510 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 18,916 21 Apr 2013
Poland, Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books, 1612-1900 1,002,155 6 Jan 2012

Did I miss any? Email Me … Proszę !

Other (Inne)

http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php – from Valerie Warunek (PGSM). Database of Indexed church records (birth/urodzenia, marriage/malzenstwa,  death/zgony) from Lubelskie wojewodztwo. No scans (skans), but it does have record (akt) #’s.

May 5, 2013

VE Day: Few know story of Jews in Red Army

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

AP: Few Know Story of Jews in Red Army

ap thumbnailJERUSALEM (AP) – Once a year, Israel’s Jewish war veterans don suit jackets and uniforms dripping in Red Army medals, the shiny bronzes and silvers pinned to their chests in tight rows like armor. About 500,000 Jews served in the Soviet Red Army during World War II. Most of those still alive today – about 7,000 – are said to live in Israel. Every year on Victory Day, which falls on Thursday this year …

Read Full Story

An excellent piece detailing how European Jews fought against the Nazis in the Allied Forces.

April 28, 2013

Pocket: A Polish-Jewish Hero — #Polish , #Jewish, #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

c.michael eliasz-solomon shared with you:
Simcha Rotem

University Michigan, Wallenberg Medal Lecture

Living history is so finite. I hope my blog captures the fragility and preserves history / family history before they are lost. Also, I know I am writing for a future. They will look back upon blogs and judge their quality when studying this era and what this era found important. I find Simcha Rotem, an eye witness / participant of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of World War II compelling and authentic.

‍   #History    #Poland    #Jewish    #HERO

A Polish-Jewish hero
economist.com – Article source
Don’t have time to view this now?

Get Pocket
pocket_embossed.gif

April 14, 2013

A Church Register Novelty in Koprzywnica — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poland_1807_1815_AnnotatedIn another case of finding something interesting whilst researching something else, I found a type of Church Register Index that I have not seen before in any other parish. So today’s blog is about that novel index I found. See the Church Register in the picture (see below).

Dateline Koprzywnica parish, 1810 – In what was after the 3rd partition was Austrian-Hungarian territory (Austrian-Poland in green), has now been annexed by Napoleon in 1809 into the Duchy of Warsaw and in another five years will be Congress Poland (Vistulaland, Russian-Poland). But in 1810 we are speaking of Koprzywnica in the powiat of Staszow and the Departement of Radom. No, that is not wojewodztwo — it is the French, Departement that is the highest level of administration in the Duchy of Warsaw. The map shows that a huge swath of green from the  Austrian-Poland partition (zabior) was annexed into the Duchy in 1809. Stanczyk’s own ancestors once again switched Empires from Austria to France. So too did the citizens of Koprzywnica (and a great many cities, towns, and villages). Poof, now the records go from Latin, in the perfunctory Latin Box (Table) Format to the lingua franca of Polish paragraph with French-style two witnesses.

So Koprzywnica, like Stanczyk’s own ancestral Villages (Biechów and Pacanów) was briefly Austrian, then French (very briefly), then Russian until 1917-1918 whence it became just Poland again. We can find Koprzywnica in the gazetteer, Skorowidz Miejscowoscy Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej as being in the powiat Sandomierz, wojewowdztwo Kielce (circa 1920’s/1930’s).

Indexes are so very helpful. It is always a let down when a parish book or a year within the book lacks any kind of index. That means I will have to look at each and every record to see if any are related to me / my research. Early Latin paragraph form church records often do not have any index  — they barely denote the year change. So that means you have to read each and every badly handwritten paragraph of Latin — very rare to find a priest with good Latin handwriting. That is why the Latin Box Format was more welcome. At least I could find the pieces of info and the handwriting was less of an issue. But the Latin Box format did not have indexes either.

So it was helpful when Napoleon implemented the Codex Napoleon in the Duchy of Warsaw. So by 1810 you see the records written in Polish (lingua franca) in a paragraph form that is specified by the Codex Napoleon. And these new records have indexes!

OK, the indexes initially are by letter: A, B, C, …, Z. So you have just under 26 pages of indexes. It is an improvement. Quickly the church realizes it can save paper by running the index all together with all letters on a single (or a few) page(s) in order alphabetically. Very efficient to scan these indexes for your families. And it was also easy to spot when a priest added a late addition to the index at the back after all other names (even though it was evidently in the wrong spot lexicographically speaking).

OK 1868-1918, we find Russian / Cyrillic indexes. In addition to priests not knowing Russian well and ordering names phonetically before later on,  we find the index in Cyrillic proper lexical order you will have to scan carefully. Cyrillic kind of forces that to those of us weaned on a Latin alphabet. But you sometimes find the Russian indexes sorted in Cyrillic lexical order … by the first name ??? That is not very useful. Sometimes the index is in chronological order (akt # / record # order) making it barely more useful then scanning every record.

But when we find a well formed index (or a not so good index) it is always for one event: Birth/Christening, Marriage / Marriage Banns, Death Records. One index for Births, one for Marriages and one for Deaths … assuming none are missing, 3 indexes. That is what makes the following index so very interesting …

The Index (Skorowidz)

1810KoprzywnicaINDEX_pg4_JewishNames_righthalf This was supposed to be a Marriage Index !! But it was five scanned pages! This would have to be an extraordinarily large city to have that many marriages! What are all of those columns ?? That is what I asked myself.

Let’s see what those columns are:  Record # (Akt #), Village Name, Person Name(s), Births (Urodzin), Deaths (Zeyscie), Banns (Zapowiedz), and finally Marriages(Malzenstwa) Kart # (you can safely ignore). This index is an all event index. Births-Deaths-Banns-Marriages all interleaved. In fact, when I look at each event (B/M/D) I see the same 99 event-record pages and the same five index pages. It appears that all events are in the same register! This is rather unique — as I said previously I have not seen this before in other parish registers I have seen.

So in this “combo style” index (which needs a proper name) you cannot have a single name  for marriage record, so marriage records have two names (as usual), but this requires two lines in this style of index — since we are multi-columnar. We also see that Banns are indicated ‘I‘ or ‘II‘ — the third bann being the actual marriage itself. The Roman numeral written above the word Zapowiedz. So since the index is in Akt# order, it is a chronological order too. It could be interesting from a demographic perspective (what time of year do most marriages occur or  do a higher concentration of deaths occur in winter months). If this style index had occurred during an epidemic year, then we could have seen all of the deaths occurring in a great streak without interruption by other events. 1810 in Koprzywnica was not such an epidemic year.

There is one more fascinating aspect to this index. In the Napoleonic era (1807 thru 1829) we find that Catholic priest acts as the civil administrator and that Jewish/Evangelic/Orthodox vital records are written in the Catholic register. How is this noted in the index — which again I have not seen elsewhere? Look at the scanned register image for this blog. Pay attention to Records #’s:

85, 86, and 91.

It so happens that each of these records is a Marriage Banns event type. But, notice that each begins ‘Zyda‘.  Żyd = Jew, hence Żyda is plural for Jews. Żydów = Jewish. This indicates that this is a Jewish civil record being recorded.  Now I know that Jewish vital records are recorded in the Napoleonic era Catholic registers. But it is unusual that it is indicated in the index (as opposed to being in the record itself).

So this was a very fascinating find after all. I was actually looking for a particular Leszczyński but I found a novel index and indeed a novel parish register overall.

Related Posts

The Fourth Partition (23 January 2013) – A Discussion of the Duchy of Warsaw, with a map

Historical Eras of Poland (21 January 2013) – A set of Stanczyk defined eras of Poland of particular use to genealogists. An historical definition of Poland’s eras (1569-present) based upon history’s impact on genealogical research.

 

Post Scriptum

The index from this column was found in the Polish website: genealodzy.pl (PTG) of which I written many times before. Their METRYK project of scanned church books is where I found the 1810 Koprzywnica Index.

April 6, 2013

Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) — #Genealogy, #Jewish, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RemembranceHolocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) 2013 begins in the evening of: Sunday, April 7
and ends in the evening of: Monday, April 8. In the Hebrew Calendar is 27 Nisan (see Stephen Morse’s Jewish Calendar Conversion tool) is Yom HaShoah and varies in the Gregorian calendar across the Months of April/May.

To honor my wife Teréza and our children let me add a Jewish Genealogy blog post. It is for a Polish village in the AP Grodzisk (Warsaw, Blonie) and is called: Góra Kalwaria. Góra Kalwaria can be found in PRADZIAD database. What is great about this news is that there is yet another project beyond the ones I have previously written about (SzukachwArchiwum.pl and Metryk in PTG). This village and its images can be found in: Metryki.GenBaza.pl (AP Gordzisk) for :

This is just one of many congregations (Catholic & Jewish) that they have scanned. There appear to be about 110 villages in total so far this Polish National Archive in Grodzisk (a branch office of Warsaw).  I picked this village because it is all about the Jewish congregation (that I provided the Pradziad link for). The records run from 1826 – 1910 inclusive and there no missing years. This is a remarkably complete/intact record of a Jewish congregation in Poland. The scanned records from 1826-1867 are written in Polish and then starting in 1868 the records are written in Russian all the way through 1910.

So for the Jewish-Polish genealogists who read this blog, here is a treasure trove to research. In actuality, many of the 110 villages have Jewish records. Look for the abbreviation ‘moj’ (short for mojżeszowe). So I hope this is a joyful news for the remembrance of this solemn occasion.

Good genealogy to all my readers!

–Stanczyk

.

April 4, 2013

Archiwum Państwowe w Suwałkach in Szukajwarchiwach.PL — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Over the last few weeks we have been discussing about Szukajwarchiwach.pl, the Polish website for “searching in archives” of the 2.4 Million Archive Images of historical vital records. So today we will look at the Suwalki Archive (Archive #63,  http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/63#tabZasoby), in particular the WIZAJNY parish in which this jester has previously plumbed (for NARKIEWICZ / SZCZESNY).

WizajnySuwalki

First off, please take note of the two red circles in the image. The first red circle around the drop down menu is set to ’15’ by default. I usually choose the drop down value ‘100’. This drop down menu controls how many ‘Units’ are displayed on each page.  So in order to minimize the number of pages and to maximize the number of items on each page, I routinely pick the ‘100’ from the drop down on each page.

Second, I was searching for WIZAJNY parish, But what I got/found was WIZAJNACH. You need to learn to recognize the root of the proper names/nouns in Polish. Fred Hoffman/Jonathan Shea call this applying the “chopping block” to get to the root of a word. So in the second red circle we find Wizajnach. That is the unit we wish to search.

Now notice the last column shows ‘5124’ (on 3 April 2013). This number is the number of “sheets” that have been scanned. So you should think images. The concept to take away is that if you see a ZERO, then there is nothing scanned; Try again later.  But in our case we should expect 5,124 images were scanned across the year range:  1808-1905.

If you want to follow along, I picked the year 1822 which 86 scanned images and selected ‘100’ scanned images from the drop down which effectively shows all 86 scans one page. These 86 images are actually “thumbnail” images that you click on to see …

Wizany1822Births

At the bottom of the image are two circles/icons. The ‘Z’ circle gives you a kind of magnifying glass for seeing a small part of the image, zoomed-in.

It is the other icon that we wish to click on (the square with the arrows at each corner, left of the ‘Z’). This icon left of the ‘Z’ pops up a window of the image more full sized. This full-sized image can be interacted with, zooming or panning or dragging the image around the viewing window. Please, note that at the bottom of this pop-up viewer window is a link you can click on to ‘Download‘ the scanned image to your hard-drive. So when you find your ancestor, you can download his/her scanned vital record.

Before I bring this post to a close. I wanted to point out how you can find the indexes (usually after the last record). This era of the 1820’s, the indexes are usually alphabetical with one letter per index page. So these kind of indexes look as shown below. You need to find the ‘Akt #’ in the index and then go to the scan that has the image of this Akt. The Akt #’s are on the outside of each image. They are on the left for the left-hand page and on the right for the right-hand page in the image scans.

IndexPages

As I mentioned in a prior blog article, the Wizajny parish is amazingly complete. It was also interesting because its records switch over in mid-year 1868. So you can see the records in Polish in early 1868, then in Russian starting in mid 1868. There are no Wizajny or even Suwalki records in genealodzy.pl (Metryk or Geneszukach) databases.

JEWISH GENEALOGISTS

Zydow

Please note that in the Napoleonic era (about 1807-1829), the Catholic parishes in Poland  were required to record the vital records for all faiths. So you will find Jewish birth / marriage / death records in the Catholic parishes books, if there were Jewish families in that area. For example, Akt #39 appears to be a Jewish birth record. Usually that is indicated in the text, but I did not see in Akt #39, BUT … if you look to the right of the record at the image on the left  (you will see a ‘Zydow’ column with a ‘1’ in it) …

Prior Related Stanczyk Articles …

A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik

Polish State Archives – Numbers

Russian Poland 1867-1875

March 24, 2013

Gazetteers, Maps, and Genealogy — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Maps, #Gazetteer

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Block_Stanczyk, has been busy revisiting the Metryk (metrical, vital records) images from genealodzy.pl of the various parishes/synagogues [hereafter I just use ‘parish’ as shorthand for ‘parish/synagogue’]. As my blog, Waiting For Polish Archives 2.4 M Scans (March 18th, 2013), indicated, I have been exhausting the possibilities for Biechow & Zborowek parishes in the Buski (Busko-Zdroj) powiat. The images are clearer, so I am replacing my existing images with these much better images. In some cases, I have found that the images of the Polish paragraph format provide me with additional details over what may have been available via only a Latin Box format copy that I might have previously had. At the very least, I have corrected a few mistakes of translation due to unreadable portions from prior microfilm I have read from/taken pictures of. So I strongly encourage others to make this effort.

I have been using the Metryk database and looking at the images/scans. Sometimes you have to look at dozens of images because there is NO index. But most of the collection (post 1812) have indexes. If you see SKU (that means index/skorowidz of births/urodziny), likewise  for SKM (for marriage), and SKZ (for death) indexes. Sometimes indexes spread across multiple pages, so you may see SK1, SKa (names begining with the letter ‘A’) or SKU1, etc. SO use these indexes to look for your family names, then just load up the scan of the akt (record) number for your ancestor — no need to search  through a multitude of images.

I have also used Geneszukacz as another kind of index to search for family names. These indexes are nice because I can catch ancestors getting married (or dying or giving birth) in another parish that I might not have known to check. If this previously unknown parish is one that has scans, then I go directly to the year/event for that parish and go to the akt specified in Geneszukacz!

So that is all great and I exhort you to do this.

But these new, previously unknown parishes. Where are they? How far away from the ancestral village are they? That is when I need a gazetteer (check out Stanczyk’s Gazetter page) or a map. If you have not been to the Polish War Map Archive (Archiwum Map Wojskowego), then today’s blog is your reason to do so. I have a map on my wall of my ancestral villages. The map’s name is: STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32. In fact, I use their MAP INDEX, 1:100,000 scale map tiled in squares (http://igrek.amzp.pl/mapindex.php?cat=WIG100). Please NOTE these map images are from about 4MB to 7MB in size. Make sure you are at a Free WiFi cafe where you can use a high-speed and the large band-width for the map images you download.

When you see, PAS think ROW and when you see SLUP think COLUMN. This is a big Cartesian Grid (or computer types can think 2d-array). It turns out that STOPNICA_PAS47_SLUP32 has: Biechow, Pacanow, Ksiaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Szczucin, Beszowa, Olesnica, and STOPNICA. In fact, that one map has many more parishes than those that I enumerated. I have a small snippet of the Map Index below (you can click on the image and it will take you to the actual map index):

MapIndex_MapyWig

So I found an ELIJASZ ancestor in Koniemloty parish getting married, who was from PACANOW parish. Now from the Metryk web app, I knew Koniemloty was in STASZOW powiat. So I go to the Map Index and look at the grid near STOPNICA (P47_S32) and voila, STASZOW is the box due north of STOPNICA in PAS46_SLUP32. If you cannot locate you powiat that way, then you must drop back to MAPA.SZUKACZ.pl (an interactive map that I have raved about before) and look for KONIEMLOTY (do not need to use diacriticals) to get the relative feel that it is north or east (or north-east). So any way, STASZOW_PAS46_SLUP32 is the map for KONIEMLOTY parish. Notice PAS46 is one row less than PAS47 (of STOPNICA). PAS decreasing is going north, PAS increasing is going south. Going east from STASZOW, we see the SLUP increases to SLUP33  (SANDOMIERZ) or going west the SLUP decreases to SLUP31 (PINCZOW). So now you can now work  with the Map Index using the cardinal directions by adding/subtracting to/from the rows/columns.

P.S. Since this is the Passover (Pesach) / Easter (Wielkanoc) season, let me honor my wife (Tereza) by pointing out that her paternal grandfather, Benjamin Solomon, had as a birth village, Proskuriw (aka PŁOSKIRÓW, Хмельницький/Khmelnitski — now in Modern Ukraine). This village is shown in the lower right-hand corner of my map snippet (PAS51_SLUP44).

March 9, 2013

Niagara Falls Gazette – 1937 — #Genealogy, #Newspaper

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Today’s blog is an intersection of some prior Social Network Analysis (aka Cluster Genealogy) and  EOGN‘s mention of FultonHistory.com (the website of Historic Newspapers). Stanczyk, waaay back discovered FultonHistory.com – An Historical Newspaper  (mostly NY) website. I was not aware that the owner (Tom Tryniski) was still adding content and that the content had grown to about 21.8 million pages, rivaling the Library of Congress’s efforts of digitized newspapers.  Each scan is a single page PDF document that is zoomable.

19370119_ZasuchaAndrew_deathNoticeSo  the idea presented itself, why not see if any ZASUCHA in Niagara Falls can be located in those 21.8 million scanned pages. I am happy to report a very good success. Take a look at the image. It is from Tuesday, January 19th, 1937 edition of the Niagara Falls Gazette. [You will need to click to read death notices – Jacobs, Geraud, Kochan, Laydon, Mahoney, Morrison and ZASUCHA].

Now I said this was a part of a long standing (i.e. “incomplete”) SNA project of mine. I am trying to do ELIASZ/ELIJASZ research by analyzing the affiliated families in the ELIASZ Social Network in Biechow/Pacanow (Poland) and Detroit/Toledo/Cleveland/Buffalo/Niagara Falls/Syracuse (USA).  My thesis is that all of these people are closely inter-related from Poland and they continued/extended their villages in the USA.

So by following these “genetic markers” (literally) of my family tree, the affiliated families, that I would be led to new facts about my direct lineage and possibly artifacts (pictures, etc.) of my ancestors. I was also hoping to lure my distant 2nd/3rd/4th cousins to me via this blog and my research in hopes of a second bump beyond my circumstantial info of the SNA. You see they would see their family names and realize the connection and we would be able to do that genealogy swapping of intelligence and/or pictures and documents.

First, an aside [skip ahead to next paragraph if you are not a ZASUCHA], the death notice transcription:

ZASUCHA – Died in Mount St Mary’s hospital, January 19, 1937, Andrew Zasucha, beloved husband of Catherine, father of Helen and Joseph, son of Martin in Poland; brother of Roman of this city. Funeral services at 9:30 Thursday, January 21, from his home, 423 Eighteenth street and 10 o’clock in Holy Trinity church. Burial at Holy Trinity cemetery.

That is some excellent genealogy info there for Andrew Zasucha of Niagara Falls who was born in Pacanow, [old wojewodztwo Kielce], Poland !

Now I am spending many hours in Ancestry/Ellis Island ship manifests, Ancestry city directories, censuses, WWI draft registrations,  etc. and now historic NY newspaper scans. I am matching people up (my nodes in the picture) and drawing lines connecting the people(nodes) to other people. I have to take some care to get the nodes right in order to draw inferences, so I tend to a conservative approach of keeping nodes separate until I have a high degree of certainty they are the same node. I use spreadsheets to collect a timeline of data and then match up people before drawing the picture. This is my SNA methodology.

I did this current project because I noticed that my grand-aunt Mary arrived to my grand-uncle John Eliasz and were in Niagara Falls (not Buffalo/Depew like most and not Detroit). I was always puzzled about why Niagara Falls. Who or What drew them there (Niagara Falls) before their sojourn to Detroit? Now grand-aunt Mary came from Ksiaznice in Pacanow parish from her brother-in-law Jan Leszczynski to her brother Jan Eliasz in Niagara Falls in 1910. All of these facts matched my family tree (except for the Niagara Falls which nobody alive had any memory of anyone living there). None the less, I slavishly recorded the address: 235 11th Street, Niagara Falls, NY.

Now let me digress. This is why I want the PLAC tag in GEDCOM to be elevated to a Level 1 tag. I want to do these analyses in my family tree. I want to find people who shared the same/similar places for family events and see if there is any connection that I am not aware of — i.e. SNA (aka Cluster Genealogy). I need it in the genealogy file and I need reports to allow me to search on place and to conform these places into a hiearchy for analysis.

Fortunately, Stanczyk still has a good memory. I was gathering data about: Zasucha, Zdziebko, Zwolski, Hajek, Leszczynski, Eliasz/Elijasz, etc. These are all families found in Pacanow parish who came to the USA and settled in: Buffalo/Depew, Niagara Falls, Syracuse, some moving onward to Cleveland, Toledo and my grandparents moving onward further from Toledo to Detroit. When I was recording addresses from the city directories, I noticed a few Zasucha being at the 235 11th street address. That address rang a bell in my memory and I went back through my family’s ship manifests to see who had been at that same address. That is when I saw that my grand-aunt and my grand-uncle had been there. So now I had a thesis that any ZASUCHA at 235 11th street the surrounding environs, would close family to my grand-aunt/grand-uncle and be direct ancestors of ANNA ZASUCHA, my great-great-grandmother, wife of MARTIN ELIASZ of Pacanow. In fact, I am pretty certain now that I have gotten this far in my SNA, that ANNA ZASUCHA had a brother(s) who had sons:   Martin,   Adam,    Josef,    Jan.  These four men had children as follows who came to Niagara Falls:

Martin (father of Andrew in the above death notice) – Andrew(the deceased), Roman, and Jan

Adam – Michal, John, Karol, Marya, and Feliks

Josef – Benedykt (son of Josef), Feliks (a 2nd much-younger Feliks, son of Benedykt)

Jan – Roman (a 2nd Roman), Teofil, Josef, and Pawel

Now the ones of greatest interest to me are the children of Adam. This is because Karol and his brother Feliks lived at 235 11th street, the same address that my ELIASZ ancestors had lived at, in the same year! That shows a pretty strong family connection in my family tree (I cannot say for your tree or not) whenever I find it happening. Of course, the other ZASUCHA of Niagara Falls are also of some interest to me as they ALL came from Pacanow. I can be pretty sure that everyone from Pacanow (or Biechow) parish is likely to share a distant (non-linear) family relationship as determined by connecting family trees.

So I owe some thanks to FultonHistory.com – An Historical Newspaper  (mostly NY) website and its creator  Tom Tryniski. Tom’s efforts have provided my the above death notice. I also found an Emil C. Mrozek (a physician) from Erie County, NY and his exploits of winning a bronze star in WWII. I also found an article of a Richard (aka Ryszard) Kryszewski who died tragically at the age of 18 in a car-train crash in Depew, NY. Now I had Richard’s cause of death from the newspaper article. So some articles are uplifting and some are tragic, but I collect them all for my ancestors.

Some people mock my genealogical research as chasing down dead people. My wife, Teréza, takes the learned Jewish position that I am doing a good deed (mitzvah) in keeping these ancestral memories alive. Tereza likes to call me the “Soul Keeper”. This blog of my musings is filled with my genealogical / family stories. Besides being a “cousin magnet”, this blog is my effort to record these stories.

 

PLACes: Biechow, Pacanow [in Poland],  Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo/Depew, Niagara Falls, Syracuse

NAMEs: ELIASZ/Elijasz, Kedzierski/Kendzierski, Leszczynski, Sobieszczanski, Fras(s), Mylek, Hajek, Mrozek, Kryszewski

March 3, 2013

The Horror ! The Horror ! … — #History, #Holocaust

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

TheScreamToday’s title comes from a quote from Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski).

In today’s NY Times (article), The Holocaust Just Got More Shocking, by Eric Lichtblau. Read this article, which enumerates the disturbing horror of WWII to ever greater numbers.

If you trace genealogy, particularly Jewish genealogy, but also Polish Christian genealogy too, you will encounter these stories — over and over again. The Horror!

Read the NYT article, but the numbers being reported by the researchers, are that they have  now cataloged some 42,500 Nazi ghettos and camps throughout Europe.

Here’s a partial breakdown:  30,000 slave labor camps; 1,150 Jewish ghettos; 980 concentration camps; 1,000 prisoner-of-war camps; 500 brothels filled with sex slaves; and thousands of other camps used for euthanizing the elderly/infirm, performing forced abortions, etc. The victims were not just Jews being victimized; They were Poles, Russians, gypsies, homosexuals, and the mentally impaired. Dr. Megargee (one of the researchers)  had expected to find perhaps 7,000 “camps”, but the number quickly passed 11,500, then 20,000, then 30,000, and now is currently about 42,500 camps. A staggering, mind numbing number.

The numbers are so much higher than we originally thought

— Hartmut Berghoff

History will now show that far more than 6 Million victims were claimed by Nazi atrocities. The Horror! The Horror!

Other Related Stanczyk Blog Posts …

Feliks Elijasz, Roman Catholic Shoemaker
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