Posts tagged ‘Sarvas’

April 9, 2018

Swabian Germans / Donau Schwabians — #Genealogy #German #Croatian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

All the way to the east (right) we see Osiek (by red 3. ), you will find Sarvas & Tenje and a bit further away west (left) & south we see Đakovo(aka Djakovo, Diakovo) written as “Diakovar” (near red 2.).

This is where a bit of my MT-DNA comes from. You see my Swabian German ancestors came from Baden-Wurtemberg Germany to Sarvas & Tenje about 1750. They were Catholic Germans.

These are the ancestral villages I am working with on my maternal side.

In Tenje we find: Gottler/Göttler, Eisenbeiser. In Sarvas, we find Vespek (aka Veszpek, Vesbek).

Recently, this jester made good head way into tracing genealogy in these parts. So I have my Swabian German from these ancestors (via Vendel born 1858) …

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April 5, 2018

Croatia, German, Genealogy — #Sarvas, #Tenje, #Djakowo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kettler = Gettler (aka Gottler/Goettler)

One could be excused if you thought this blog was solely upon Russian-Polish partition genealogy. Well Stanczyk has another branch (maternal) that is German. I have been told they were Swabian Germans located in modern day Croatia in the Osiek-Baranja county, specifically: Sarvas, Tenje, and Djakovo. This area was Austria-Hungary, Jugoslavia and now Croatia, but there were German Catholic settlers here.


Today is a quick post on the area and the family names of interest. This database can be searched online at FamilySearch.org (Croatia). According to Google Maps it is only about 10 minutes (via car) or about 90 minutes on foot between Sarvas and Tenja.

Now this interesting to Stanczyk, because his maternal grandparents came from these two villages/towns. Vespek came from Sarvas and Gottler came from Tenja. As with other families, there are affiliated families that are “genetic markers” to my Vespek & Gottler families: Reiner, Reither/Rajter, Elter, Keller, Eisenbeiser, Kasper/Kaschper.

What I learned from other Gottler researchers in this area is that I should expect to see that Gottler = Gettler = Goettler. Think “get” not “got”. The ‘O’ has an umlaut over it. So Gottler. Now If you look closely at the image at top, we see the priest recorded Gettler in two ways (Gettler, Kettler). In fact he recorded that equivalence in the record! So now I have to keep Kettler/Kottler in mind as well.

Now the jester mentioned Djakovo (which is a bit west of the map’s left border) because my mother’s two half brothers (Joseph & Wendell) emigrated from “Jakovo” from an uncle whose last name was Rajter. Now I know their mother’s maiden name was Eisenbeiser, so I am expecting to find an Eisenbeiser + Rajter(Reither) marriage in one of these villages.

More later as my research firms up. But if you have an ancestor from Sarvas and in particular House #43 in Sarvas, then we need to compare family trees.

 

May 11, 2014

♥ Happy Mothers Day ♥ — #Genealogy, #German, #Croatia, #Romanian, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Happy Mother’s Day 2014   – First, Stanczyk wishes to thank my wife on Mother’s Day and then to wish all mothers a day of  joy.

I love my wife, Teréza, and one of my goals for my recent research trip  was to find her paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages. I have some clues from American records, but Jewish records are hard to locate. But I was able to locate a census  of the Austrian Hungarian Empire for the Maramaros region and the village of Kovesliget in particular which is very near to the present day border of Ukraine (by Khust) and inside Romania. The only record I found for that locale was from 1828 census, so I cannot prove that Misek Volfe (Jewish) is a direct line ancestor of her paternal grandmother, Bessie Wolf. But it does confirm for me that I have the correct locale from the US records.

 

For my own mother, Rosemary, I was able to locate her Vespeks in Sarvas (Osijek-Baranja county of modern day, Eastern Croatia).  This corresponds to the LDS microfilm: FHL INTL Film # 1739003 Items 1-3. I first had an inkling from my maternal grandfather, Jozef Vespek’s naturalization papers.  I also had seen some records that FamilySearch had posted on-line and so I had more than an inkling that I would find Vespeks in the LDS microfilm. I also found Reiter, which had been in the ship manifest for my mom’s half brothers (Jozef & Vendelin when they came from their uncle Rajter).

Genealogy is all about your family … those people in your tree and Mother’s Day is another fine day to honor those named therein, particularly the mothers.

mday

May 12, 2013

♥ Happy Mothers Day ♥ — #Genealogy, #German, #Croatia, #Vespek

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

VespekVendelin_Birth18581108_SarvasCroatia_GGrandfather

Stanczyk, was not intending to write a blog post today. I hope Genealogy Moms are having a wonderful day today  … too.

Yesterday, I was researching on FamilySearch.org. On a lark, I thought I would look at Croatia. In particular at Tenje. I did that because my maternal grandmother, Roza Göttler (aka Gottler/Goettler/Gettler). From her ship manifest, I knew her to come from Tenje (which was Austria-Hungary, then Jugoslavia, now presently Croatia). This explains the ever changing ethnicity throughout the US Federal Censuses. I did indeed find Gottlers in Tenje. I did not find my grandmother’s parents or my grandmother … unfortunately the years available online would not meet my needs. But something unusual happened. I found other affiliated family names: Eisenbeiser and Elter. So I am now convinced that Tenje (the Roman Catholic records) is where I will find my maternal grandmother.

That was so uplifting, on a lark, I thought I’d search for my maternal grandfather’s village. His was a bit of a problem too. Differing country names (like Roza Gottler), but his village name changed often too, so even though I had ship manifest, Declaration of Intent, and finally a Petition for Naturalization, I was still uncertain where he was from. I was pretty sure he was from the same area as Roza Gottler. My paternal grandparents were both married once, before they married each other and had my mother. So my grandfather emmigrated alone and my grandmother emmigrated with her first husband (John Reiner). Over the years, I developed many clues which I collected even though they did not fit together. This weekend, the clues came together! These stray clues allowed me to verify that the records I was viewing were my own family. What a gift on Mother’s Day weekend. I found both of her family parents’ families  this weekend!

It turns out that my grandfather was born in Sarvas (now in Croatia) and in the same district as Tenje. So all those sources: Sawas is from Ship Manifest , then  Storvish is from Declaration of Intent, and  Dowash is from the Petition for Naturalization. The first Vespek birth record I found spelled the village as Starvas. These are all the same place! Some were slightly misspelled. Now I can see it. So in the same FamilySearch project in two different villages I found my maternal lines. Some direct lines, some indirect branches, others are affiliated families.

So I have set a fairly high level of confidence in these findings. As such, I believe I have found my Great-Grandfather Vendelin Vespek’s birth record. This is not 100% certain and I have to find 1 or 2 missing pieces to make it a 100% certain. For those who are second (or 3rd) cousins researching in the Vespek family tree pay attention to the remainder and download the image at the top.

NOTES:

Croatia, Church Books, 1516-1949 Roman Catholic (Rimokatolička crkva), Sarvas

Corresponding LDS MF #’s – 1739003 Items 4-5,  1739004 Items 1-7

Sarvaš Births (Rođeni) 1847-1865  [for Vespek, Kasper, Kantner, Fechtig, Emert, Platz, Zorn]

URL: FamilySearch Sarvas, Croatia  [image 66 of 298]

Birth 8th / Baptism 9th – November – 1858

Vendelin son of Vendelin Vespek & Catherine Kaschper (aka Kasper)
born in Sarvas, House #43

Godparents:  Tobias Jobst & Joanna Kreines

See Also …

Tenje (Osijek) – FamilySearch.org [for Gottler, Eisenbeiser, Elter]

URL:  Tenje

P.S.

Even though most of the records are in Latin, there are still records in Croatian.So for my Polish genealogy researchers, I would hasten a tip. As I was doing this I saw month names that were close to month names for Polish. Croatian is a Slavic language (albeit Southern Slav). So when I saw LISTOPAD (Croatian), I was immediately thinking NOVEMBER (in English), because LISTOPAD in Polish = November in English. But in Croatian, LISTOPAD = October. Surprise!

From Google Translator:

January, February, …, December – (English)

Sijecanj, Veljaca, Ozujak, Travanj,  Svibanj, Lipanj, Srpanj, Kolovoz, Rujan, Listopad, Studeni, Prosinca – (Croatian)

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