Archive for ‘Technology’

September 15, 2013

Ancestry App v5.0 — #Genealogy, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry5_0

Ancestry.com has updated their app to version 5.0 (iTunes App Store). I like their newest effort.  It looks nice and the User Experience (UX) is improved for the most part. I miss  having a button for showing just the lineal line (not siblings) to save space on the iPhone. Also the UX does not provide ways to go up or down your family tree other than what is displayed on screen (5 generations on iPhone). Why no arrows on top/bottom rows. You can of course click on someone higher up in the tree and see further back generations from that person, but you may not realize that there are prior generations unless you know your tree well. No visual key that more generations exist.

When you upgrade you will  need to download your whole tree again (does that imply their local db changed and needs to be reloaded?) and that takes about 30–45 seconds for a tree of 1,142 people. Small price to pay. I do wonder if the new app is causing problems for the Ancestry.com web site. It has performed slowly and sometimes the app says Ancestry.com is not available. Perhaps mobile app users are putting a bigger strain then online users.

AncestryError

Ancestry.com site problems?

It integrates more closely with Facebook. That did not appeal to me, but for some people it may be just what you want. As a result I do not know what happens when you connect your Facebook profile to a person in the tree (does it post the timeline to your Facebook timeline?).

Besides, Facebook, the app now integrates with Ancestry.com more completely. The app now works a lot like the web site. It does not appear to be missing any features. I like the new Timeline view of a profile … very nice.

The Gallery button on the bottom of the profile view quickly loads your images (much faster). It also automatically searches for hints too. Finally this view has a new feature to find sources (from Ancestry.com?) for your facts. Very nice.

The tight integration to the web site does mean the app switches control to a Safari web-app but the integration is so tight you might not notice the switch to Safari and back to the App

September 7, 2013

Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Stanczyk

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

05September2013_FSFamily Search has updated their Polish Collection & Czech Census too on September 4th & 5th.

Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966; http://bit.ly/X9qxJ8

Poland, Lublin  Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 was also updated: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1867931

Also Czech Republic Censuses 1843-1921:  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1930345

Add  Family Search Wiki Page if your genealogy research area is Poland:

https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Poland

Images and indexes of church books containing baptisms and births, marriages, burials and deaths for the parishes in the Radom & Lublin Roman Catholic Dioceses of Poland.

Births end in 1912,

Marriages end in 1937, and

Deaths end in 1982    due to Polish privacy rules.

August 12, 2013

Oracle 12c – Multi-Tenant Databases — #STEM, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle12c

Oracle 12c

Oracle’s newest database (version 12c) has many new features, the discussion of which are too big for a single blog article (or even a series of blogs). The substantial high-level bulleted list of new features is in the 12c New Features Manual . But the concepts and low level SQL language details show a much larger change then you might perceive.

Multitenant Database

The new paradigm shift, Multitenant Databases, will stop DBAs pretty quick, particularly in Windows where the installer creates a Container DB. Previous to 12c, all databases were Non-Container DBs. With 12c you can create a Non-Container DB or a Container DB. The Container DB can have zero, one, or more Pluggable DBs within. A Non-Container DB can never have a Pluggable DB. So that becomes an upfront database creation decision.

You can and you should read the Oracle Intro to Multitenant Databases .

I first relaized the Oracle Installer had created a container database for me when I went through the normal process of creating a database user using the same old techniques I always did and received an Oracle Error: ORA-65096. WHAM, I slammed right into the new paradigm without me even knowing it existed. The error description and the necessary action introduced to another part of the Multitenant Database paradigm: Comon User vs. Local User. That quickly led to Containers. Of course, with any new features, comes an array of new database schema tables like, v$pdbs for example. You will also probably use a new Sql*Plus command a LOT: SHOW CON_NAME to know what container (root or pluggable database) you are connected to. Some DBA commands must be done in the root container (CDB$ROOT). Your pluggable databases (in Windows) will be by default: PDB$SEED and PDBORCL. Every container database has precisely one seed pluggable database from which all pluggable databases are created from.

This paradigm shift will be  seriously disorienting feeling to long time DBAs, especially if were not aware this was coming. Fortunately, there are many DBA bloggers out there sharing their 12c experiences. They were a help for me to gather the necessary jargon. But it was not until I discovered that Oracle had created a tutorial on Multitenant Databases and I had spent an hour or two playing with the tutorial on my newly created sandbox database (on Windows) which was by default a Container DB. This tutorial is an excellent way to jump start your understanding of the new paradigm.

By the way, I think either the default should be a NON-CONTAINER DB (so you are backwards compatible) or the Oracle Intsaller needs to make it clear that a CONTAINER DB will require new DBA processes (i.e. a learning curve) and give you an OVERT option to create a NON-CONTAINER DB for backwards compatibility.

Conclusion

Read the Oracle Introduction to Multitenant Databases to understand the concepts. Then immediately work your way through the tutorial in a test database that is a Container DB. Ultimately, I think Container DBs are the way to go. I think this is what you want to do to implement a CLOUD or in a Virtualized Environment.

August 8, 2013

Wordless Wednesday — #Oracle, #12c, #STEM, #GEEK

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle 12c installed . Getting my #GEEK on this week.

 

Ora12c_Installed

August 7, 2013

Oracle v 12c … vs. Greenplum MPP — #STEM, #Oracle, #Greenplum, #BigData

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Studying up on Oracle v. 12c. As usual, there are many new features to recommend migrating or deploying to the new version of Oracle. Last blog, I talked about just a few: ILM, ADO, HEAT_MAP and how these buzz-worthy acronyms were related to compression inside the database. Before,  I get into today’s topic, I wanted to talk about  a bit more about the Automatic Data Optimization (ADO).

I failed to make clear yesterday, that the ADO, automatically relocates your cold data or compresses your data as it ages through its Lifecycle automatically. That is the magic. You define the policies and the database will relocate or compress a segment(s) or a row(s) to save space or to clear space on more expensive hard disk, by relocating to slower/less accessible disk storage media. Pretty nifty idea.

By the way, you may be wondering … 8i, 9i, 10g, 11g, 12c what is the pattern or meaning of these major release versions from Oracle.?  Well, “8i / 9i” were from the era, when Oracle was the “Internet” database (you know  like iPhone, or i-<Anything>). Then “10g / 11g” were to be the “Grid”. Grid never really achieved buzz-worthy status. Now we have “12c”. It should not surprise you that we are now in the “Cloud” era. So Oracle’s letters are for: Internet, Grid, and Cloud . Now you know.

That Cloud and yesterday’s ADO  will figure in today’s blog too. You see, I was recently asked about Greenplum. Could I use it? As is my wont, I took a step back and studied the question. Here is my answer.

GreenPlum

Oracle

MPP platform

MPP – RAC(aka Oracle parallel server)

Full SQL (Postgres)

Full SQL (Oracle, ANSI)

Compression

Compression since 11g, ADO/ILM 12c

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes

B-Tree / BitMap Indexes

JDBC/ODBC/OLE

JDBC/ODBC/OLE/Pro*C (etc.)

Parallel Query Optimizer

Parallel Query Optimizer

External Tables

External Tables

GreenPlum HD (HDFS)

External Tables using an HDFS

I believe that as an Oracle expert (28+ years from v2.0-11g inclusive), that I could effectively use Greenplum on a project. If you look at the above chart, I think you will see what I am about to explain.

Green is an MPP platform. Very nice acrhitecture. Oracle can sit on top of any architecture (MPP, SMP, or any cluster or Highly Available or Fault-Tolerant Failover set of servers) you can setup.

Both use FULL SQL.  That means ANSI compliance and with enhancements (POSTGRES for Greenplum and ORACLE, uh, for Oracle).

B-Tree and Bit Map Indexes for both — yawn old hat. Parallel Query Optimizer – been there, seen that for a while.

Greenplum has JDBC/ODBC/OLE interfaces. Oracle has those too, plus a full complement of Pro*C (or many other languages) embedded pre-compiled 3GL languages. Oracle is well supported by Shell Scripts like PHP or PERL that have their interfaces to Oracle. Slight advantage to Oracle. But the point is, Oracle professionals have done this for more than a decade.

External Tables too are a feature in both databases.  GreenPlum HD uses the External Table to provide HDFS access in GreenPlum via SQL or other in-database features. Now I had not previously thought to try and use HDFS with Oracle. But the External Table is precisely the feature I would use. Can it be done? A look at Oracle’s documentation answers that:

LINK: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27101_01/doc.10/e27365/directhdfs.htm

CREATE TABLE [schema.]table
   ( column datatype, ... )
   ORGANIZATION EXTERNAL ( TYPE ORACLE_LOADER
                        DEFAULT DIRECTORY directory
                        ACCESS PARAMETERS
                            ( PREPROCESSOR HDFS_BIN_PATH:hdfs_stream access_parameters
                        ... )
                        LOCATION (file1,file2...)
                      );

CONCLUSION
So I recommend that companies fell free to utilize Oracle consultants on Greenplum databases. There is an awful lot of overlap that the Oracle specialist can leverage from his/her background and transfer to the Greenplum database.

Of course, for companies without Greenplum, it looks like you can use many of the same features already in Oracle including using HDFS filesystems with External Tables.

So get to that BigData, your friendly Oracle expert can help you.

August 6, 2013

This Jester Has Been Consulting the Oracle — #STEM, #ILM, #ADO, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 06 Aug 2013 — 

OracleLogo
If you are the same age as Stanczyk, then when you see the acronym, ILM, you probably think of George Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic. But this article is about the Oracle of Larry Ellison. Oracle has released its latest version of its database, 12c, on June 25th, 2013.

So the ILM, of this blog is about Information Lifecycle Management. I thought you might need a buzz-word upgrade too — hence this blog. In the latest 12c, Oracle is advancing its ILM paradigm to make Automatic Data Optimization (ADO) a differentiator in Data / Databases. You see data storage is eating the planet or at least the IT budgets of many large companies. That Big Data has to live somewhere and the costs to house that data is very significant. Ergo, Oracle is giving you a way to  Tier your data storage  amongst differing costs media (hi to low) and using differing levels of compression, depending on your data’s lifecycle. Hence ILM.

ILM_ora

Source:  Oracle Documentation

The idea is that data ages from very active, to less active, to historical, to archival. You ideally would want to place the most active data on the fastest, most reliable, … most costly hardware. Likewise, as the data ages, it would be preferable to place on less costly storage devices or in a more compressed state to save space and costs. How can you do that effectively and without a large staff of IT professionals?  This is where the ADO comes in.

Using your familiar create table or alter table commands you can add an ILM policy to compress or relocate your data. Oracle provides segment level or  even row level granularity for these policies. How do you know what data is active vs inactive? Oracle has implemented a HEAT_MAP facility for detecting data usage. HEAT_MAP is a db parameter. Set it on in your init.ora file or via an alter session command in sql*plus (to do it on a session basis instead of database wide.

 ALTER SESSION SET HEAT_MAP=ON;

You can check on things via:

 SELECT * FROM V$HEAT_MAP_SEGMENT;

There is even a PL_SQL stored package:  DBMS_HEAT_MAP.

So this is a quick update on ILM, ADO, and HEAT_MAP in Oracle 12c database. Go to the Oracle yourself and see what you can get on this new technology.

Tags: , , , ,
July 28, 2013

FamilySearch.Org — #Genealogy, #STEM, #Database

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 22 Jul 2013 — FamilySearch.Org  New Database

FamilySearch.Org has some new databases (don’t they always — they are amazing). One in particular caught this jester’s eyes.

United States, National Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel Files, 1954-1970,

By training and long years in the field, Stanczyk is a STEM worker. So I was drawn to this database. But who did I know had a degree and was a professional in 1954-1970 ? How about one of my favorite authors … in a register of Science / Technical professional? Well, yes — if you thought of  Isaac Asimov .

So what data is in this database …

If click on the FamilySearch.org link, then query on Isaac Asimov, you will see:

Asimov

July 14, 2013

A Bit of Blog Bigos … #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy since the 4th of July! So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my blog.

bigos_huntersstewA bit of bigos (recipe) !!

Let me point out that in June the Polish Archive completed their latest update on: ♥ http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/ .

Unfortunately, it did not include anything from the old wojewodztwo: Kielce (now in SwietoKrzyskie). See the image of the drop down menu below (not full listing but to give you an idea on what is in and how that is somewhat limited for researchers like Stanczyk. I hope another phase will commence soon!

 

SzukajArchiwum_June

Meanwhile on:

♥  genealodzy.pl – They added the death records from 1875-1908 for Pacanow parish to their Geneszukach database. Previously they had added the Birth and Marriage records. These are transcription / indexes, not actual church record images such as you find in their Metryki database.

Still I have found dozens of Eliasz (and … Gawlik, Gronek, Hajek, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Major, Paluch, Wlecial, Zasucha, etc.) that I was previously unaware of. Now I will need to get the actual images in order to make sense of these indexes and the new people in order to add them to the family tree.

Enjoy the bigos. Smaczne (delicious)!

May 21, 2013

Pacanow 1875-1908 Index

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St. Martin -  Pacanow Church about 1918

St. Martin – Pacanow Church about 1918

Stanczyk, has been sifting through the Index created on genealodzy.pl in their Geneszukacz database. Alright, only the Births Index, so far.

I see they have a total of nearly 7,300 people from those years (1875-1908) in their Birth Index. From Adam … Żyp . There were 58 ELIASZ in their index.Notice they used ELIASZ and not ELIJASZ. I found that interesting. They removed ‘J’ when they produced the index. Was that an error? Or was the indexer an expert? Because, in my heart of hearts, I believe the name (at least back to 1690) was ELIASZ.

It was only since 1869 when the Russian Empire forced Poland to keep records in Russian (Cyrillic) that the ‘J’ appeared from the Russian character ‘я’ (Ya) that ELIASZ became элияшъ .  элияшъ is transliterated in a Latin alphabet as ‘Elijasz’.

I only wanted to mention this as while I believe the translated properly produced the index with respect to ELIASZ; You will need to realize that finding the record in Russian/Cyrillic, you will need to look for a different translation (i.e. ELIJASZ/элияшъ) in the indexes and the actual church records.

So now I have an index of ELIASZ born in Pacanow in the years 1875-1908. Now what? I compared the list of 58 with what I already had/knew. I saw an overlap of 22 people. So I have 36 new ELIASZ to resolve and add into the family tree. My options are:

  1. Write to Pacanow parish and request specific records (since I have year, Akt#),  
  2. Write to Polish National Archive (again with detailed info),
  3. Hire a genealogist in Poland,
  4. Go on a genealogical tour to Poland.

The year range 1875-1908 is not completely in LDS microfilm. Although 1875-1884 is in LDS MF #’s:

1192351 Item 10,    1192352 Items 1-2,   1807621 Items 8-11,    1807622 Items 1-3

So doing research in a local Family History Center or at the Family History Library (Salt Lake) is not an option for the remaining 36. So I now have better options for remote research.

My List of 58 ELIASZ.

May 19, 2013

Genealodzy.pl – Geneszukacz Database, Pacanow 1875-1908 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Pacanow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealodzy_plOn http://genealodzy.pl/  Stanczyk  saw that they have an updated GENESZUKACZ database.

My ancestral village, PACANOW, was indexed for BIRTHS (1875-1908). I was able to verify it was correct with my grandfather (whose Birth Record I have) and a few others. I also found some I did not know about !!!   I only wish they had the images (like in METRYKI database). Thank you: Wojciech Liśkiewicz (who I think was the indexer)!

Later in the day they(he) also added MARRIAGES(1875-1908) too.

BIRTHS

MARRIAGES

See Also:

Domagala, Hajek, Kedzierski, Odomski, Paluch, Poniewierski, Siwiec, Wlecial, Wojtys, Zasucha, Zdziebko, Zwolski

May 12, 2013

♥ Happy Mothers Day ♥ — #Genealogy, #German, #Croatia, #Vespek

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

VespekVendelin_Birth18581108_SarvasCroatia_GGrandfather

Stanczyk, was not intending to write a blog post today. I hope Genealogy Moms are having a wonderful day today  … too.

Yesterday, I was researching on FamilySearch.org. On a lark, I thought I would look at Croatia. In particular at Tenje. I did that because my maternal grandmother, Roza Göttler (aka Gottler/Goettler/Gettler). From her ship manifest, I knew her to come from Tenje (which was Austria-Hungary, then Jugoslavia, now presently Croatia). This explains the ever changing ethnicity throughout the US Federal Censuses. I did indeed find Gottlers in Tenje. I did not find my grandmother’s parents or my grandmother … unfortunately the years available online would not meet my needs. But something unusual happened. I found other affiliated family names: Eisenbeiser and Elter. So I am now convinced that Tenje (the Roman Catholic records) is where I will find my maternal grandmother.

That was so uplifting, on a lark, I thought I’d search for my maternal grandfather’s village. His was a bit of a problem too. Differing country names (like Roza Gottler), but his village name changed often too, so even though I had ship manifest, Declaration of Intent, and finally a Petition for Naturalization, I was still uncertain where he was from. I was pretty sure he was from the same area as Roza Gottler. My paternal grandparents were both married once, before they married each other and had my mother. So my grandfather emmigrated alone and my grandmother emmigrated with her first husband (John Reiner). Over the years, I developed many clues which I collected even though they did not fit together. This weekend, the clues came together! These stray clues allowed me to verify that the records I was viewing were my own family. What a gift on Mother’s Day weekend. I found both of her family parents’ families  this weekend!

It turns out that my grandfather was born in Sarvas (now in Croatia) and in the same district as Tenje. So all those sources: Sawas is from Ship Manifest , then  Storvish is from Declaration of Intent, and  Dowash is from the Petition for Naturalization. The first Vespek birth record I found spelled the village as Starvas. These are all the same place! Some were slightly misspelled. Now I can see it. So in the same FamilySearch project in two different villages I found my maternal lines. Some direct lines, some indirect branches, others are affiliated families.

So I have set a fairly high level of confidence in these findings. As such, I believe I have found my Great-Grandfather Vendelin Vespek’s birth record. This is not 100% certain and I have to find 1 or 2 missing pieces to make it a 100% certain. For those who are second (or 3rd) cousins researching in the Vespek family tree pay attention to the remainder and download the image at the top.

NOTES:

Croatia, Church Books, 1516-1949 Roman Catholic (Rimokatolička crkva), Sarvas

Corresponding LDS MF #’s – 1739003 Items 4-5,  1739004 Items 1-7

Sarvaš Births (Rođeni) 1847-1865  [for Vespek, Kasper, Kantner, Fechtig, Emert, Platz, Zorn]

URL: FamilySearch Sarvas, Croatia  [image 66 of 298]

Birth 8th / Baptism 9th – November – 1858

Vendelin son of Vendelin Vespek & Catherine Kaschper (aka Kasper)
born in Sarvas, House #43

Godparents:  Tobias Jobst & Joanna Kreines

See Also …

Tenje (Osijek) – FamilySearch.org [for Gottler, Eisenbeiser, Elter]

URL:  Tenje

P.S.

Even though most of the records are in Latin, there are still records in Croatian.So for my Polish genealogy researchers, I would hasten a tip. As I was doing this I saw month names that were close to month names for Polish. Croatian is a Slavic language (albeit Southern Slav). So when I saw LISTOPAD (Croatian), I was immediately thinking NOVEMBER (in English), because LISTOPAD in Polish = November in English. But in Croatian, LISTOPAD = October. Surprise!

From Google Translator:

January, February, …, December – (English)

Sijecanj, Veljaca, Ozujak, Travanj,  Svibanj, Lipanj, Srpanj, Kolovoz, Rujan, Listopad, Studeni, Prosinca – (Croatian)

April 30, 2013

Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952 — #Genealogy, #Michigan

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was overjoyed at the announcement of the newest FamilySearch.org database:

Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952

The URL / Link is:  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1968532 [bookmark it]

FamilySearch_MIDeathCerts_1921_1952

They just published it 29 April 2013 [after some issues were discussed]. No your eyes are not playing tricks, the FamilySearch.org website has had a makeover recently. It may be a unsettling if you have not visited the site in a while, but persevere, it is worth it.

Hurry and grab your dead relatives in case any controversy causes this database to disappear!

 

April 6, 2013

Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) — #Genealogy, #Jewish, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RemembranceHolocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) 2013 begins in the evening of: Sunday, April 7
and ends in the evening of: Monday, April 8. In the Hebrew Calendar is 27 Nisan (see Stephen Morse’s Jewish Calendar Conversion tool) is Yom HaShoah and varies in the Gregorian calendar across the Months of April/May.

To honor my wife Teréza and our children let me add a Jewish Genealogy blog post. It is for a Polish village in the AP Grodzisk (Warsaw, Blonie) and is called: Góra Kalwaria. Góra Kalwaria can be found in PRADZIAD database. What is great about this news is that there is yet another project beyond the ones I have previously written about (SzukachwArchiwum.pl and Metryk in PTG). This village and its images can be found in: Metryki.GenBaza.pl (AP Gordzisk) for :

This is just one of many congregations (Catholic & Jewish) that they have scanned. There appear to be about 110 villages in total so far this Polish National Archive in Grodzisk (a branch office of Warsaw).  I picked this village because it is all about the Jewish congregation (that I provided the Pradziad link for). The records run from 1826 – 1910 inclusive and there no missing years. This is a remarkably complete/intact record of a Jewish congregation in Poland. The scanned records from 1826-1867 are written in Polish and then starting in 1868 the records are written in Russian all the way through 1910.

So for the Jewish-Polish genealogists who read this blog, here is a treasure trove to research. In actuality, many of the 110 villages have Jewish records. Look for the abbreviation ‘moj’ (short for mojżeszowe). So I hope this is a joyful news for the remembrance of this solemn occasion.

Good genealogy to all my readers!

–Stanczyk

.

April 5, 2013

AP Kielce, An Inventory of the National Archive in Kielce, Poland — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

APKielce

From a forum at genealodzy.pl  Stanczyk saw a PDF document mentioned. When I looked at it, I saw it was an inventory (in progress) of the holdings of  the National Archive in Kielce (AP w Kielcach). So I have produced a condensed version of their work-in-progress. Yes, most of these are related to Stanczyk’s family tree. For their complete inventory list (which was 424 items), see the link (URL) at the bottom of this table.

Now I mention this particular AP (National Archive) because it is the archive that covers the Russian-Poland partition that my ancestors were from. There may be other inventories for other archives.

AP KIELCE

 # Nr zespołu – # Rec. Group Stan na dzień (as of) 2013-02-01 Nazwa daty skrajne – date range księgi – books metry ilość sfotografowanych ksiąg – number of books photographed ilość zrobionych zdjęć – number of photos taken Braki – deficiencies
1 388 Beszowa 1875-1911 54 71 58 3770 oddział Sandomierz
2 341 Biechów 1875-1908 55 0.83 55 2 538
3 146 Kazimierza Wielka 112 1.03
4 353 Oleśnica 1875-1911 61 0.97 69 3 506
5 812 Opatów 1825,1890-1906 14 0.39 11 2369 oddział Sandomierz
6 152 Opatów 120 1.31
7 658 Opatów-gr 1834-1836 4 0.04 4 36 oddział Sandomierz
8 44 Opatów-moj 1831-1910 46 0.95 47 6860 oddział Sandomierz
9 814 Opatów-pr 1896-1915 19 0.23 20 573 oddział Sandomierz
10 871 Ożarów 1890-1910 3 0.06 4 445 oddział Sandomierz
11 45 Ożarów-moj 1826-1909 43 0.61 43 3419 oddział Sandomierz
12 355 Pacanów 1875-1908 62 0.91 64 3 703
13 373 Pacanów moj 51 0.76
14 245 Połaniec 1810-1910 106 2.05 106 12507 oddział Sandomierz
15 252 Połaniec-moj 1826-1910 88 0.99 92 3425 oddział Sandomierz
16 246 Staszów 1810-1910 103 1.65 103 10146 oddział Sandomierz
17 253 Staszów-moj 1826-1910 84 1.33 86 6236 oddział Sandomierz
18 362 Stopnica 48 0.88
19 374 Stopnica moj 46 1.29
20 582 Stopnica pr 3 0.02
21 97 Tumlin 189 1.67
22 370 Zborówek 1875-1908 58 0.66 65 2 295

Source: http://s6.genealodzy.pl/pliki/asc/apkielce.pdf

I tried to provide a reasonable translation (using Google Translator with some hand-tweaks) of the Polish Column Headings in English.

LEGEND (3rd Column):

A suffix of moj or -moj indicates Jewish records.

pr – Orthodox Catholic

ew – Evangelical

gr – Greek Orthodox

The rest (or any with  rk) would indicate Roman Catholic.

I believe the Column Heading METRY indicates the actual shelf space of storage this record group physically occupies. I believe the units would be in Meters (m). Remember Europe uses ‘,’ where America uses a decimal point. Some appear to be missing the decimal point. In most cases, it appears that Excel has translated the comma to decimal point, but if you look at the source document, you should be aware of this cultural difference.

April 4, 2013

Archiwum Państwowe w Suwałkach in Szukajwarchiwach.PL — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Over the last few weeks we have been discussing about Szukajwarchiwach.pl, the Polish website for “searching in archives” of the 2.4 Million Archive Images of historical vital records. So today we will look at the Suwalki Archive (Archive #63,  http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/63#tabZasoby), in particular the WIZAJNY parish in which this jester has previously plumbed (for NARKIEWICZ / SZCZESNY).

WizajnySuwalki

First off, please take note of the two red circles in the image. The first red circle around the drop down menu is set to ’15’ by default. I usually choose the drop down value ‘100’. This drop down menu controls how many ‘Units’ are displayed on each page.  So in order to minimize the number of pages and to maximize the number of items on each page, I routinely pick the ‘100’ from the drop down on each page.

Second, I was searching for WIZAJNY parish, But what I got/found was WIZAJNACH. You need to learn to recognize the root of the proper names/nouns in Polish. Fred Hoffman/Jonathan Shea call this applying the “chopping block” to get to the root of a word. So in the second red circle we find Wizajnach. That is the unit we wish to search.

Now notice the last column shows ‘5124’ (on 3 April 2013). This number is the number of “sheets” that have been scanned. So you should think images. The concept to take away is that if you see a ZERO, then there is nothing scanned; Try again later.  But in our case we should expect 5,124 images were scanned across the year range:  1808-1905.

If you want to follow along, I picked the year 1822 which 86 scanned images and selected ‘100’ scanned images from the drop down which effectively shows all 86 scans one page. These 86 images are actually “thumbnail” images that you click on to see …

Wizany1822Births

At the bottom of the image are two circles/icons. The ‘Z’ circle gives you a kind of magnifying glass for seeing a small part of the image, zoomed-in.

It is the other icon that we wish to click on (the square with the arrows at each corner, left of the ‘Z’). This icon left of the ‘Z’ pops up a window of the image more full sized. This full-sized image can be interacted with, zooming or panning or dragging the image around the viewing window. Please, note that at the bottom of this pop-up viewer window is a link you can click on to ‘Download‘ the scanned image to your hard-drive. So when you find your ancestor, you can download his/her scanned vital record.

Before I bring this post to a close. I wanted to point out how you can find the indexes (usually after the last record). This era of the 1820’s, the indexes are usually alphabetical with one letter per index page. So these kind of indexes look as shown below. You need to find the ‘Akt #’ in the index and then go to the scan that has the image of this Akt. The Akt #’s are on the outside of each image. They are on the left for the left-hand page and on the right for the right-hand page in the image scans.

IndexPages

As I mentioned in a prior blog article, the Wizajny parish is amazingly complete. It was also interesting because its records switch over in mid-year 1868. So you can see the records in Polish in early 1868, then in Russian starting in mid 1868. There are no Wizajny or even Suwalki records in genealodzy.pl (Metryk or Geneszukach) databases.

JEWISH GENEALOGISTS

Zydow

Please note that in the Napoleonic era (about 1807-1829), the Catholic parishes in Poland  were required to record the vital records for all faiths. So you will find Jewish birth / marriage / death records in the Catholic parishes books, if there were Jewish families in that area. For example, Akt #39 appears to be a Jewish birth record. Usually that is indicated in the text, but I did not see in Akt #39, BUT … if you look to the right of the record at the image on the left  (you will see a ‘Zydow’ column with a ‘1’ in it) …

Prior Related Stanczyk Articles …

A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik

Polish State Archives – Numbers

Russian Poland 1867-1875

April 1, 2013

World Backup Day

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1 April 2013 – Dateline Philadelphia

Yes, this jester knows its April Fool’s day; But who better than a jester to speak truth to the people (uh … genealogists, librarians, archivists, & researchers) on this day? The first of April has become the impetus for backup and preservation.

20130401-051142.jpg

You need only look at today’s world of crazy dictators or Mali terrorists to see that cultural/historical artifacts can disappear in an instant. Cyberwarfare can claim your harddisk. The cloud could crash or hurricane Sandy can happen (please donate to Ellis island Foundation to help in that restoration effort). Libraries and Archives need to safeguard your artifacts too! Are you motivated yet? Good!

There are backup solutions, including some free options to the “cloud”. Apple even provides a free 5GB iCloud. So save your GEDCOM file. If you still have free space then backup pictures or scans that are CRITICAL. You can save/backup to media: CDs, USB thumb drives, etc. But be aware that backup to electronic media needs to be refreshed yearly to avoid stranding your backups on outmoded technology (i.e. 8Track tapes or even floppy disks).

Be careful out there and have a Happy April Fool’s Day!

March 28, 2013

Mailbag … A New Missive — #Genealogy Email

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

From the Post Office Department

From the Post Office Department

I was going though the mailbag and I received the following missive:

therealbetty commented on A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik — #Polish, #Archive, #Guide, #Poradnik

Thanks for all your work on this! I tried to check your list of towns and I would like records from the Przeciszow and Oswiecim area in Malopolskie. Am I out of luck this time around as I could not find them? I am assuming that area is in the Krakow archives.

Well therealbetty, thanks for writing again! That is a very good question. I went back and looked at the NAC’s PDF document that listed Archives/Parishes being put online:

http://nac.gov.pl/files/D’ASC1_02_2013v.3.pdf

I did not see Oswiecim (aka Auschwitz) listed. To be sure it was a parish, I looked it up in a Gazetteer [Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego i Innych Krajów Słowiańskich (The Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland & Other Slavic Countries)  — see my Gazetteer page]:

OswiecimParish

It says the Roman Catholic (r) is in Oswiecim (i.e. “loco”), the Greek Catholic/Orthodox is in Krakow and the Evangelical parish is in Biala. This is the Oswiecim you mentioned as you can see it is in Wojewodztwo (old woj.) Krakow, Powiat Biala, Gmina Oswiecim. (2nd-4th columns).

So, unfortunately, the short answer to your question is, “No, Oswiecim and Przeciszow are not in this release of online records.”

Przeciszow was in Wojewodztwo (old woj.) Krakow, Powiat Wadowice, Gmina Przeciszow and it is a parish too, as you probably knew.

–Stanczyk

March 27, 2013

A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik — #Polish, #Archive, #Guide, #Poradnik

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been writing for a while about Polish National Archives announcing via their National Digital Archive (NAC) that Poland would be putting 2.4 Million digital images of church / synagogue metric images from their regional archives online. So today’s blog post is a guide (poradnik) about how to use szukajwarchiwach.pl to view these images.

It is easiest if you know the regional archive you are interested in, but you do not need to know it really. I will demonstrate with the RZESZOW regional archive. This archive was in Austrian-Poland partition, so its records should be for those locales to Rzeszow. Recall from my post, Polish State Archives – Numbers (13 March 2013) where I listed the archive numbers, that Rzeszow = 59.

Œ Œ

Step By Step


Step_1Step One

            Go to the archive of interest – http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59#tabInformacje

You should see the web site with the information for the Rzeszow regional Archive.

Rzeszow_Step_01_02

Notice the two links: Poprzednie archiwum  and Następne archiwum . With these two links you go through the list of regional archives. The list of archives only includes those archives for which they are presently loading images. If you hover over my two links above you will see ‘Previous Archive’ and ‘Next Archive’.

Step_2

Step Two

            Click on ‘Resource’ [see 2 in red circle] –  which brings you to the list of collections at Rzeszow. http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59#tabZasoby

You should see …

Rzeszow_Step_02

Step_3

Step Three

 Click on Collection Number ‘59/20/0‘ for the civil records from the Roman Catholic parish of Błażowej – http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59/20/0#tabZespol

You should see …

Rzeszow_Step_03

Step_4

Step Four

Click on ‘Units 20/20‘ in red circle – http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59/20/0#tabJednostki

You should see …

Rzeszow_Step_04

Step_5

Step Five

Click on ‘Reference Code 59/20/0/-/1‘ in red circle - http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59/20/0/-/1#tabJednostka

You should see …

Rzeszow_Step_05

Step_6

Step Six

Click on ‘Digital Copies 107‘ to see a table of 107 scanned images – http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/59/20/0/-/1#tabSkany

You should now see the scanned images …

Rzeszow_Step_06

There are 107 images [currently] and the data looks like it is in the Latin Box format. Since there is no index, you will have visit each image in turn and look at each row of boxes to see if that birth/baptism is for one of your ancestors.

So that is a visual guide for how you navigate the  szukajwarchiwach.pl website to get to the scanned images. Obviously, you will need to focus on the villages/parishes for your ancestor. That may be another Archive (besides Rzeszow) or if it is in the Rzeszow archive then you need to pay closer attention to the parishes in the Rzeszow collections and finally, you will need to select Birth/Marriage/Death (Urodziny/Małżeństwo/Zgony) for the year of interest to you.

You will still need to be able to deal with Latin or Polish or Russian or German language in the records to understand what you see in the scanned images. You will also need to be able to read the handwriting. But you can do this!

Good Luck!

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