Archive for ‘History’

August 9, 2016

Christopher Columbus is Polish … Who Knew? #Book

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Columbus The Untold StoryStanczyk has written about this controversy three times … 2010, 2011, and 2013. But now we have for the first time Researcher & Author, Manuel Rosa ‘s magnum opus of Columbus (aka Colon) mythology debunked and rewritten as history. 

Prior Blogs (Background):

  1. Christopher Columbus Discovers … He Is POLISH!
  2. Happy Columbus Day – Get Out Your Polish Flags
  3. Cristobal Colon (Discoverer Formerly Known as Columbus) … Polish-Lithuanian & Italian Noble — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Lithuanian

Now the Columbus Book for the 1st time is published in English!
http://www.columbus-book.com/
This jester is going to add this book to his Wish List! 

May 19, 2016

Romanov Russian Royalty … REDUX

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This jester has a deep appreciation for Dr. Stephen Morse and his many works, especially those related to genealogy. I have used his One Step Web Page for many years. So it was thrill to meet him at various conferences and I was touched at his kind offer to help  moje zona read her grandparent’s tombstone (alas the jester struggles with his Hebrew language skills). I have followed his recent work to make yet a 3rd generation soundex algorithm (for us Slavics).

Originally, we had American Soundex, which you still see on Immigration documents (mine is E420). Then along came the most excellent Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex which was a vast improvement for those whose heritage was Slavic (mine is 084000) and you would see it on Russian Consular records.  Recently Dr Morse has developed the Bieder-Morse Soundex algorithm which further improves name matches (by eliminating false matches). So my family name would have Bieder-Morse soundex tokens of:  elaS elas [exact match tokens only] . I think only the JewishGen website has implemented that matching.

Now Dr Morse has an article(Genetic Genealogy Revisited) in the APG’s professional journal: “Association of Professional Genealogists QUARTERLY”. It was on the use of genetics in genealogy and he used the Romanov Family mystery as a demonstration of using genetics to solve a question. Now I read in the Current issue of the Smithsonian,  the Resurrecting the Czar, article. It too covers the latest background on murder mystery of Czar Nicholas II and his family and attendants. I found that the two aritcles read together give a fascinating account of the story.

Now this jester is not a fan of the Russian Empire (even though my grandparents and their parents were born into Russian-Poland partition).  The Rus betrayal of Poland not even a century after the great  King Jan Sobieski, the Savior of Vienna [indeed all of Europe],  the “Lion of Lechistan” and  their betrayal again in 1939 at the start of World War II sour my feelings for our brother Rus. So while I enjoyed the two articles read back-to-back, I was appalled by a few “royalists” who want to bring back the monarchy to the Russian Federation. One woman artist actually is hoping for a Russian fascist (to clean up the mess??) followed by a transition back to the monarchy. That would be quite a rewind of history huh?

Czech, Lech and Rus – there is a legend of three brothers that settled central and eastern Europe. Czech went on to found the Czechs and Rus went on to found the Russians. Lech and Lechistan became Poland. So we can see again that monarchies and the battles between them are really nothing more than family squabbles done on a grand scale. By the way both articles mention the British monarchy  and their family connection to the Romanovs (via Hapsburgs).  Canute the Great was a Grandson of Mieszko I (first king of Poland) and of course another ancestor of this jester, the twice king Stanislaw Leszczynski, had a daughter marry into the Bourbons. Alas all of Poland’s goodwill and family relationships could not prevent the Deluge and Poland’s slip from History’s main stage. We will have to content ourselves that Rus and their partitions, produced Kosciuszko and Pulaski and they in turn helped to produce America.

Now we come to 2016 …

There is an artist,  Olga Shirnina, who has taken Romanov family photos and colorized them. Please read the article: RBTH (Romanov family photos in color) from “Russia Beyond The Headlines”.
Romanov Links:

Romanov Photos British Archives

Romanov Family Tree

May 11, 2016

Meme: Wordless Wednesday — #History Mackinac Bridge

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon


The Mackinac Bridge is only a couple years older than this jester, built in 1957. Here are some of the ferrys that got people from Mackinaw City to St. Ignace before the bridge.

May 2, 2016

May 3rd — Constitution Day — #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Warsaw Gazette
May 3rd Constitution (see middle of Warsaw Gazette) / Konstytucja_3_Maja
The Constitution of May 3, 1791 (Konstytucja Trzeciego Maja) was drafted between October 6, 1788, and May 3, 1791, when it was adopted by the Great Sejm of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth . The contitution’s adoption was preceded by a period of agitation with the Convocation Sejm of 1764 and the election of Stanisław August Poniatowski as the Commonwealth’s last elective monarch.
The constitution had sought to prevail over and eliminate the anarchy, caused by the Liberum Veto, which had put the Country/King at the mercy of any single Sejm deputy who chose, or was bribed by an internal interest or external foreign power, to undo all the legislation that had been passed by the Sejm. The constitution’s adoption met with immediate hostilities, both political and military by the Commonwealth’s neighbors. In the War in Defense of the Constitution, the Commonwealth’s ally Prussia, broke its alliance with the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, which was effectively defeated by the three Empires: Russia, Prussia, & Austria-Hungary (aka Hapsburg).
[NOTE the parallels between this Sejm’s use of liberum veto and the U.S. Congresses of 2008-present who have abused/utilized omni-present obstructionist tools: filibuster and cloture to keep the Obama administration for achieving its goals.]
British historian, Norman Davies describes the legal document as “the first constitution of its type in Europe”; Other historians documented it as the world’s second oldest codified national constitution after the U.S. Constitution, which was effective on March 4, 1789 — just two years earlier.
The Commonwealth’s 1791 Constitution remained in effect for all of 14 months and 3 weeks. It would be a long time until the Second Republic would re-emerge after World War I and Poland would re-appear and be a free republic again.
[Source Material from Wikipedia]

Tomorrow is May 3rd and in Poland and Lithuania it is celebrated as Constitution Day (first celebrated jointly on May 3rd 2007). But Stanczyk is getting ahead of himself in this story.
This jester trusts by now that you know that Poland was country with the second constitution. I am also hopeful that you had read a prior blog article of mine: “Poland 1794, The Tempest, and Catherine The Great” . For the discussion on Poland’s Constitution, I’d like to try my hand at an even broader context.

1732

Stanczyk maintains that 1732 was a very bad year for Poland. On 17 January 1732 Stanislaw Poniatowski was born in Wolczyn (which is in modern day Belarus). If the year had begun badly, then it would get much worse. On 13 September 1732, the secret treaty was signed at the Alliance of the Three Black Eagles. This was a secret treaty between Prussia, Russia and Hapsburg-Austria Empires (all three had Black Eagles as emblems — in stark contrast to Poland’s White Eagle). They agreed to maintain Poland in their “status quo” suffering from a non-functional szlachta with a Libretum Veto — meaning a single veto could derail any new law, further meaning that laws almost never got passed [sounds like 2009-2012 Washington D.C. does it not?]
Now let me narrate the rest of the story, before I give Constitution Day’s Timeline.
In 1750 Poniatowski met his mentor, the Briton, Charles Hanbury Williams . Williams was the British ambassador to Russia. They met again in 1753. Now while the Poniatowskich were a noble family, their family fortunes were not so great as the great magnate families. So they had to align themselves and hope for a strategic marriage for Stanislaw to a wealthier family. None the less, Stanislaw’s father was able to procure him some nominal titles. In 1755, the elder Poniatowski got his son Stanislaw, the title of Stolnik of Lithuania. Stolnik was a court office in Poland and Russia, responsible for serving the royal table. Keep that image in mind.
So armed with his new title of Stolnik of Lithuania, Stanislaw accompanied the British Ambassador to Russia, where the young Poniatowski met the also young (but very formidable) Catherine who had not yet become Empress of Russia (nor yet earned, her appellation, “The Great”). Stanislaw Poniatowski was only at the Russian court for one year. By 1756 Poniatowski was ordered to leave the Russian Court amidst some “intrigue”. It is thought that this intrigue resulted in the birth of Anna Petrovna (by Catherine the Great) on the 9th December 1757. It is also said that Stanislaw always hoped his bedding of Catherine would result in a future marriage for him. This jester thinks that Stanislaw deluded himself to think he had successfully wooed Catherine and that marriage was possible for the two of them. This jester also further thinks that Catherine, used this virtual “apron string” to manage Poniatowski to do her Russian bidding in Poland.
In 1762 Catherine used her new position as the Russian Empress and she was able to get Stanislaw to be elected King of Poland on 6 September 1764. It has now been 32 years of managing Poland’s status quo by the Three Black Eagles. So by 17 February 1772 the Three Black Eagles agreed to partition Poland. On August 5th, 1772 the occupation manifesto was issued and foreign troops entered Poland’s sovereign territory and forced a cession Sejm to convene with King Poniatowski and agree to the partition manifesto (probably Stanislaw thought it was best to go along with Russia in this matter and that this obedience would be rewarded) on 9/18/1773. Not much leadership in this jester’s mind was exhibited, but opposition to three Empires was probably futile anyway.
Life goes on for another decade. Stanislaw uses what little wealth of the Kingdom to foster arts & science, but with Prussia’s control of the Baltic Ports, and using its control to extort high custom duties from Poland on 80% of Poland’s economic trades to further collapse Poland’s economy and that limits Poniatowski’s wealth/power. Poniatowski also continues his hope for a noble marriage, but he does engage in a morganatic marriage to Elzbieta Szydlowska in 1783 and thereby maintains his options for a royal marriage.
In 1788 the Four Year Sejm convenes and Stanislaw thinks he can help Catherine The Great in her war with the Ottoman Empire by raising an army in Poland — which Catherine quickly squashes, but leaves the Polish Sejm alone while she wars with the Ottomans. Left to their own devices, this “Enlightened” body of lawmakers passes a constitution on 3rd May 1791. Even King Poniatowski celebrates this event. If you have read my prior blog article listed above, then you know this will NOT end well for Poland (or Poniatowski who is forced to abdicate the Polish throne 11/25/1795).
I think you can see that Poniatowski, Stolnik of Lithuania, served up Poland as a feast for Catherine The Great to enjoy repeatedly until even she was forced to make him abdicate and spend the remainder of his three years of life as a nominal prisoner in St Petersburg, Russia (so he could not meddle further in Russian affairs). Poniatowski died 2/12/1798 in St Petersburg, Russia. Poniatowski’s remains were removed and re-buried in Wolczyn, Belarus — until that church fell into disrepair. Poland reclaimed Poniatowki’s remains and he was buried a third time (14 February 1995) in St. John’s Cathedral in Warsaw, Poland — the very site where he had celebrated the Polish Constitution on May 3rd 1791.

Timeline of the Constitution:

5/3/1791 – Constitution is Passed (2nd in the world).
May 1792 Constitution Day is celebrated.
July 1792 King Poniatowski joins the Targowice Confederation against Poland and his own nephew (and Kosciuszko too) who were fighting the War To Defend The Constitution with Russia and Catherine the Great who was now freed up from warring with the Ottomans and now able to show her displeasure.
1793-1806 – Constitution Day is banned during the the 2nd/3rd Partition years.
1807-1815 – Constitution Day is celebrated in the Duchy of Warsaw thanks to Napoleon.
1815-1918 – Constitution Day is unofficially celebrated / discouraged in Congress Poland
April 1919 – The re-emerged Polish Republic celebrates Constitution Day again until 1940.
World War II – Constitution Day is banned again.
1945 – Constitution Day is celebrated.
1946 – The Communists cancel Constitution Day. They substitue May Day (May 1st) as an attempt to replace the Constitution Day celebration.
April 1990 – Poland out from under the Communist yoke celebrates Constitution Day again.
May 3rd 2007 – Poland & Lithuania celebrate Constitution Day jointly echoing their former Commonwealth days. This is the first jointly celebrated Constitution Day.
Perhaps one day, the USA will celebrate with Poland on May 3rd as the two countries with the oldest constitutions. [Now, please I know Polonia all over the USA, but most notably in Chicago mark May 3rd annually.] Indeed you are reading this blog about May 3rd. So Polonia still mark the day, the old country adopted the second oldest constitution.

Happy Constitution Day!


May 3rd is also Feast Day of Mary Queen of Poland!

But that is another story. 

Tags: ,
February 15, 2016

Presidents Day … Redux — #Genealogy #DNA

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

  Its been three years since my first Presidents Day blog:

https://mikeeliasz.wordpress.com/2013/02/16/
This time I wanted focus on a novel genealogical / genetic story about Presidents Day. This story comes from the Toledo Blade newspaper. One of their journalists, Tyrel Linkhorn, had a story in his family that they were related to President Lincoln. So to confirm the oral history, he used DNA!  It turns out he is related to an illegitimate half-brother of the sixteenth president.  Now that is a DNA success story. 
The full story (worth a read) is here .

August 31, 2015

INS/USCIS & NARA – How To Do Research — #Genealogy #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1934_LeonP_RemovalLast week Stanczyk took part in  a webinar:  An Overview of Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Records at the National Archives — by Zach Wilske.

It was an excellent webinar. It was my first genealogy webinar! The AT&T Connect that the NARA used for the webinar worked extremely well. I used the iPhone app (as opposed to the laptop software). The iPhone app work well. I heard the presenter over the phone and was able to see the slides simultaneously on the phone.  Very nice choice by the NARA/USCIS and executed well by Zach Wilske.

This jester had a goal to figure out how to research a fact from a number located on Ancestry for Leon Pieszczochowicz. I found Leon in Ancestry’s:  Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952

I had found a number(s)/code :  55,874-84

Mr Wilske did a thorough job explaining the topic and out popped my answer without my even having to text a question to the presenter. I needed to go to  NARA in Washington D.C.

I also learned that you need three pieces of info: RG (Record Group),  Entry#, & File# . So what did I have and how do I research it?

 

Ah, I have a File#. What do I do with it?

This jester will be looking up (on a reference service slip, as shown above):
Leon Pieszczochowicz
RG#     85
Entry# 9
File#    55,874-84

As per Mr. Wilske, I sent an email to: cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov

to confirm the file is still extant.

August 26, 2015

Ancestry.com & Gannett Collaborate To Bring >80 U.S. Newspapers Online — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GannettAncestryDateline 24-August-2015 — Two days ago this announcement / presswire was published: here . It said that more than 80 newspapers would be digitized and brought online. Now, I am thinking this will not be in Ancestry.com, but in their other product: Newspapers.com (thus requiring you to subscribe to two offerings).

Already this collaboration has born fruit in that Cinncinati Enquirer has 4 million pages available online. Now this jester went to Gannett’s website and saw that they have 95 U.S. newspapers (not including USA Today) covering about 2/3 of  the U.S. states. Michigan, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, California, Texas, Wisconsin have at least one newspaper each. Each archive will ultimately include every available page from the first date of publication up to about 30 days prior (to the present? or the announcement?).

This jester is waiting for the Detroit Free Press (MI) and Times Recorder Zanesville (OH) where I expect to find some ancestors in the news. They do not have a Buffalo or Philadelphia paper nor are there any newspapers in Illinois, but they cover a large swath of areas where my ancestors settled.

Gannett Michigan / Ohio Holdings:

Michigan

Ohio

July 2, 2015

Sir Nicholas Winton Dies — Hero of #WWII #Genealogy #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

wintonNicholas Winton, MBE — born 19 May 1909, died 1 July 2015 . Obituary: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11711344/Sir-Nicholas-Winton-humanitarian-obituary.html  [please read]

Stanczyk took note of the passing of Sir Nicholas Winton. Sir Nicholas saved 669 children, [Complete List] from Czechoslovakia most of whom were Jewish from Nazi death camps. There are now over 6,000 living people as a result Winton’s heroism. Follow the above link to see the names / pictures of who Winton saved.

Winton died 1st-July-2015 at the age of 106. He was often called the British Schindler for his work. He might have been forgotten but his wife, Grete. She remembered a photo album of names & pictures of the children Sir Nicholas saved during the war.

His website: nicholaswinton.com lists the children and so much more from his noble life.

 

See More: [bing results]: http://www.bing.com/search?q=sir+nicholas+winton&qs=HS&pq=sir&sc=8-3&sp=1&cvid=8f5e0705da8c428a963e1354afe27ef0&FORM=QBLH


 

 

May 26, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland, Part 2 — #Genealogy #Polish #History & #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

— — — — — — Diacriticals to Use (in search box):      ą   Ć  ć   ę   Ł  ł   ń   ó   Ś  ś   Ź   ź   Ż   ż

— — — — — — just copy/paste the above text characters as necessary in your search


 

Stanczyk, was talking about the interactive 16th century map of Polish Crown-Lands the last blog article.

We were talking specifically about a zoomed in search of Pacanów:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now the last article mentioned:

  1. zoom / scale tool (lower left)
  2. search box (upper left which is closeable )
  3. map features like the square box being the parish, etc.

In this article I want to talk about a few more user interface / user experience (UX) elements:

  1. toolbar
  2. panel, with tabs [far right]
  3. tab, check boxes (for more details) [far right]
  4. “Materials” menu [upper right]

Here is the image (clickable) I will be addressing:

Pacanow_16thCentury_Boundaries

The place name search box has been hidden so we can see more of the map under the search box.

Toolbar

For the toolbar we find the following icons (top to bottom):

Show/Hide Panel (to show hide the layers/legend tabs), max zoom-out, previous map, next map, zoom at selection, zoom-in, zoom-out, pan,  info on selected map object, select rectangluar region to zoom in on, tool tip,  measure (distance, area), query editor, refresh map. Now I want to emphasize a few of the toolbar tools. Just hover over a toolbar icon to see the name of each tool. Click on an icon to select the desired tool (before interacting with the map).

The Show/Hide Panel tool at the top is to show or to hide the right-most area known as the Layers/Legend Panel (that contains the two tabs, “Layers” & “Legends”. This is again a way to show more of the map. I also like the Measure tool. The measure tool allows you to draw either a line or a polygon shape. Drawing a line will give you the distance between two points. Drawing a polygon will give you total area and the length around the polygon edges. To draw a line click on measure tool (3rd from bottom) and drag your mouse to the second location and double-click (to end line drawing). So if you  select the measure tool you will see an info box in lower right corner of your screen that gives the distance/area. So if you click on Pacanów and double-click on Biechów, the distance shown should be approximately 7 km (roughly 4.2 miles) between my grandfather’s village and my grandmother’s village. You can clear the distance info in the bottom corner and redraw your line(s) as necessary. The Pan tool (shown as a hand) is necessary to drag the map up or down or right or left to pan the map. You need to click on the pan tool before trying to move the map (or you will be doing whatever the last selected tool was). The last tool I wanted to mention is the, Tool Tip tool. The tool tip is a very nice tool that provides info on a village as you hover over its square/dot).

Panel / Tabs / Checkboxes

ThePanelThe Panel is the right-most part of the map and you can toggle on or off the showing of the panel via the top tool in the toolbar.  There are five layers for this 16th century map available (from the underlying data). The panel has two tabs, “Layers” and “Legend”.

Each layer has a box with a ‘+’ in it that you click on to expand (the box then contains a ‘-‘ which you click on to close). For this article we are only interested in “Ecclesiastical Borders”. This layer allows us to show the checkboxes for the boundaries for a parish or a deaconate (aka deanery) or a diocese. The two that can be most helpful for studying your ancestors are the parish boundary and/or the deaconate boundary. In the above map, I checked both parish and deaconate boundaries. Now keep in mind that these church boundaries are the way they were back in the 16th century and not for the current times and in most cases also do not match the 18th/19th centuries either. These borders can point out the relationship between nearby parishes and also show which set of villages make up a parish. Both of these visual clues are helpful to the genealogical researcher.

The checkboxes when checked show the boundary and when unchecked do not display the boundaries.

Materials Menu

MaterialsMenuThe Materials Menu  is near the upper right corner (above the map area) and it allows you to switch between collections whose data are map based. It shows the same map but the layers change to show the new details that can be displayed through the user interface.

I particularly found the “Libraries of Wislica”, “Protestant Communites 16th-18th centuries”, and “Religions / Confessions 18th century” to be VERY interesting !

Now using the Layers tab and the Info tool can be most useful. The objects on these maps open up rows of data via the info tool to show a lot of useful material that you must see to believe. This is one of the best uses of a spatial (i.e. map) user interface that I have yet seen. It may take some time to master the user interface, but I assure it is worth it if you want to go much deeper in your understanding of your family history in Poland. If you are looking for old synagogues or to find minority religious denominations that are uncommon this site is a treasure trove of help.


May 16, 2015

Atlas of Sources & Materials of Old Poland — #Genealogy #Polish #History #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was combing through genealodzy.pl  (aka PTG). In their discussions they mentioned a new website with an interactive map of Poland from the 16th century. That was excellent and I will discuss it this blog article and continue in the next with examples. But I decided to see what else the website had and that is how this jester go to:

Atlas of Sources and Materials for History of Old Poland

If you see the polish language version, merely click on the British flag to see English language. This site has seven assets worth perusing and examining in depth, including the interactive map of the Polish Kingdom in the 16th century (16w).

  1. Polish Territories of the Crown in the 16th century.  Spatial Database
  2. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Kalisz in the 16th Century
  3. Tax Registers from the Voivodeship of Poznań in the 16th Century
  4. Religions and Confessions in the Polish Crown in the 2nd half of the 18th Century
  5. The Court Records of Wschowa, 1495-1526
  6. Register of Protestant communities in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
    in the 16th-18th centuries
  7. Parish libraries of Wiślica praeposite in the second half of the 18th century

 

This blog is primarily about Kielce wojewodztwo (or gubernia) and some surrounding areas too. So while I dutifully inform my readers who are interested in other Polish Genealogical matters or Geographical area that there are Tax Registers for  KALISZ or POZNAN. There are also a statistical record of ALL religions in the Polish Kingdom of the 18th century (very useful for classifying your ancestral parish’s congregation or identifying a synagogue location). Likewise, the register of PROTESTANT congregations in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth for 16th-18th centuries (16w-18w). This jester did not investigate the court records … yet. Lastly,  the parish libraries of Wislica is heavy Latin lifting, so while I did peruse and find some possible future gems, I will skip this too. So I will return to the 1st item in the list, the interactive map which is a treasure for all wojewodztwa (provinces/states/voivodes).

 

Here is the link (using English, clicking above link will lead to an intermediate set of choices which uses Polish map):

http://hgisb.kul.lublin.pl/azm/pmapper-4.2.0/map_default.phtml?resetsession=ALL&config=korona&language=en

You should see:

AllPoland_16w

 

Let’s type ‘Pacanów’ (no quotes, and diacriticals are needed). Since it is inconvenient to enter diacriticals, you can start typing and let the software, autocomplete for you (thus supplying the necessary diacritical). Keep in mind that this what Poland looked like in the 16th century! So that is why you see Wislica ‘District’ and the Sandomierz wojewodztwo in the pop-up box — which you should promptly close . Next we need to zoom as, all you can see is the blue-green box that represents Pacanów (not the actual text). So in the lower left of your screen is the zoom tool. Click on plus 2-3 times or drag the little slider arrow or you can do as I did and enter ‘100000’ (no quotes) into Scale field at the bottom.

You should see:

PacanowZoom_16w

 

Now you notice villages with green boxes (ex. Solec, Swiniary, Biechow, etc.). These are parishes that existed in the 16th century.

— — — — — — Diacritcals to Use:

ą Ćć ę Łł ń ó Śś Źź Żż

 

Next time we will examine the map further.


 

April 16, 2015

Holocaust Remembrance Day – 70th Anniversary

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

Yad Vashem

 Today … a little over an hour ago, Israel commemorated the Holocaust. At sundown last night and beginning  with sunrise, the Israelis remember. They remember so that it, The Holocaust, will never happen again. If you were in Israel you would see at 10:00am local time, a siren sounds and that everything comes to a stop. Pedestrians stop walking. Cars halt … people get out of their cars (some) and it is silent. Last evening  … candles & lights. Today, silence and commemorative events.

#Remember what happens when a people ignore the rights and dehumanize a small segment of their own society. In the 2oth Century it was the Nazis. Today,  who are engaging in similar atrocities?

If you have eyes to see, then you know who. Remember. We should all remember!

March 18, 2015

USA VETS — by war   #WordlessWednesday

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Fold3 has a useful Infographic …



Do not forget Polish-American vets of Haller’s Army were World War I

Tags:
February 17, 2015

Citizen, Soldier, Ancestor — #Genealogy #Military #Citizenship

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Immigrant War Service Early 20th Century

We are an immigrant nation and multicultural, diverse melting pot of people. So from the beginning we controlled the process of who is a citizen with full rights that accrue from being an American.

Citizenship & Naturalization 

http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12.html

Somewhere along the way, the USA developed a tradition of rewarding service in the defense of this nation with easy citizenship. So after almost every war, we amended our laws to allow the citizen-soldier a fast track to citizenship.

Military Naturalization

http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-ntz-military.htm

 

Next … Losing Your Citizenship.

January 27, 2015

Holocaust Remembrance Day — 70th Anniversary

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

2015/01/img_0735.pngToday is the 70th Anniversary of the Anniversary when the survivors were freed from Nazi extermination camps around Europe. It is also the 27th Holocaust Remembrance day too [they coincide intentionally].

With the IS genocide and other crimes against humanity being performed by them and other terrorist organizations around the globe, it makes today more solemn, more imbued with God’s grace  than usual. Remember WWII ‘s horrors and strive to prevent these terrors ever again to honor that sacrifice of innocents from WWII.

 

— Stanczyk [for my wife & family]


 

January 17, 2015

Jakob Eliasz, The First Pacanow Eliasz ? — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

17971004_marr_EliaszJakob_PaszenskaSusanna

Jacob Eliasz married Susanna Parszenska on 4-October-1797 in Swiniary

Stanczyk’s direct paternal lineage goes through Pacanow, SwietoKrzyskie, Poland [powiat Buski, gmina Pacanow]. Today there numbers about 1275 people [source: mapa.szukaj.pl ]. Its parish, located in Pacanow is Sw. Marcin. The church has been honored as a basilica, by the Vatican. This region has been part of a few wojewodztwa, In the LDS Microfilm its located under Kielce wojewodztwo/gubernia with its records 1875-1905 written in Russian that means it was last in the Russian partition of Poland. Its records from the AP can be found online at GenBaza:

http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,52754,1

So  we have: C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon->Chester S. Eliasz->Joseph Eliasz->Jozef Elijasz->Marcin Eliasz (b. about 1819). So this blogger’s great-great-grandfather is Marcin Eliasz (aka Elijasz) born about 1819, as deduced from his death record in 1879 Pacanow [Akt #60]. So 1819 (or probably a bit earlier than that) is the oldest known direct ancestor from Pacanow. There are a few other lines that go back that far but they are not my direct line, nor even properly connected to our branch.

But recently while going through Swiniary parish, nearby to Pacanow, I found a marriage record from 1797 !  The groom was Jakob Eliasz age 40, from Pacanow (and House #1 too). Jakob was a widower. His age of 40 implies a birth year of about 1757. The birthplace is unknown for certain but it could have been Pacanow. His bride was Zuzanna Paszenska age 23, a maiden (her 1st marriage) and she lived in Oblekon village in Swiniary parish. The two witnesses were Franciszek Zyglicki [an affiliated family name] and the Economa of Huta Oblekon, Grzegorz Ciescelski. Ok, I cannot say with certainty that Jakob was in Pacanow from 1757, but DEFINITELY he lived in house #1 of  Pacanow in 1797 as a widower.

1797 Context

During these days (Jakub & Zuzanna), the history of Pacanow, it was after the third partition of Poland in January 1796. From every pulpit announced these areas were a part of the Austrian Emperor, Franz II ‘s empire. In this way Pacanow became part of the district of Stopnica [source:  http://pacanow.pl/page.php?kat=2&main=2&id=2 ].

Later, Pacanow was a part of the Duchy of Warsaw during Napoleon’s era until June 1815. Afterwards, the Congress of Vienna ceded the area to become part of the Polish Kingdom (aka Congress Poland) and part of the Russian Empire.

Earliest History

Pacanów was first mentioned in a church document from 1110 – 1117,  issued by the  Bishop of Kraków Maur, in which construction of St. Martin church was confirmed. At that time, the village probably belonged to a man named Siemian, who was also mentioned in the document. The existence of the parish church was confirmed on August 1219 by Bishop of Kraków Iwo Odrowąż .

In 1265, the village was granted Magdeburg rights by Prince Bolesław V, the Chaste. In the same period, a number of other local villages were also granted town charters (Połaniec, Nowy Korczyn, Koprzywnica and Opatowiec). The original charter of Pacanów has not been preserved, but in a document issued on February 26, 1603, King Zygmunt III Waza stated that Pacanow had been incorporated as a town in 1265.

Jakub & Zuzanna Eliasz

Past experience has shown that house #1 is usually the nearest to the church and sometimes denotes a person of some means. So perhaps 40 years  old Jakob was a “catch” for the 23 year old Zuzanna. Perhaps my direct lineage run through Jakob and Zuzanna. But, what is certain is they are earliest documented ELIASZ [Eliaszow] in Pacanow. Now can I find some distant cousin who is descended from Jakob & Zuzanna?

December 22, 2014

1772 Polish Wojewodztwo, Diocese, and Deaconates — #Polish #Genealogy #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_ParishesInPoland_mapXVIsegmentStanczyk is busy with holiday chores, including wishing you, my dear readers a Happy Holidays & a Happy, Healthy New Year too. As most regular readers know, I spend a lot of my time writing about genealogy with a focus on Polish genealogy and in particular in the geographical areas surrounding my paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages (Biechow & Pacanow in old wojewodztwa Kieleckie, now a part of SwietoKrzyskie woj.). Like most areas in and around Eastern /Central Europe the borders change … frequently. So today’s blog article is about 1772 just before the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth was partitioned amongst the neighboring empires (you know who you are/were, you Black Eagle Empires).

It is interesting to note that Pacanow was a much more important regional village in 1772. It was in fact, a deaconate, subordinate to the diocese of Krakow in the Gniezno Wojewodztwa. At that time, there were only two Wojewodztwo (Provinces): Gniezno in the west and Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg, Leopolis, the city of Lions in whatever language) in the east. Any other wojewodztwo were in the Lithuanian portion of the Commonwealth. So the civil/religious hierarchy of the time was: Poland->Gniezno->Krakow->Pacanow, which  along with Opatowiec deaconate contained most of the villages this author writes about [you might be tempted to toss in Polaniec and Sandomierz too]. That area is shown in the map at the top. I do a lot of research for my family in the above map, west of Polaniec and south of Pinczow (the lower/left quadrant) in almost every parish north of the Vistula (Wisla) river I have located a record for someone in my family tree  —  you might say, the bones of Stanczyk’s DNA are rooted here.

So let me enumerate the parishes from this 1772 map that are present in my genealogy:

Biechow & Pacanow (grandparents), Stopnica, Ksziaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Olesnica, Szczebrzusz, Beszowa, Opatowiec, Busko and probably another 8-9 other villages with a person here or there. I think Solec too, but I have not found that record yet. I also a few stray, unconnected family records from Szczucin (the only parish south of the Vistula … so far). Are these in your bones too? Drop me a line in the New Year and we can compare family trees.

By the way, this research is from the PGSA’s CD-ROM, “The Latin Church in the Polish Commonwealth in 1772” [ISBN – 978-0-924207-12-9 ].

December 12, 2014

Royalty — The Dynasty Continues … #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GrimaldiTree

10 – December – 2014

The House Grimaldi was founded in 1160 AD with Grimaldo Canelli. Such a long lived and august dynasty deserves much attention and so …
Stanczyk would like to announce the latest royals to be born …

PARIS (AP) – Each newborn got 21 cannon shots, the bells tolled for 15 minutes and the air filled with the sound of boat horns when Monaco’s royal twins were born. And everyone in the tiny principality gets a day off to celebrate.
“I wish to share this moment of happiness with the Monegasque people and more widely with all my country’s residents,” new father Prince Albert II said Thursday.

Princess Charlene gave birth Wednesday to little Gabriella and Jacques, the 28th generation in the dynasty. Long live the Grimaldi Line!


 

December 7, 2014

1772 Map of Poland’s Wojewodztwo (Provinces) — #Map #Genealogy #Poland

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_Woj_Sandomierski

Today, Stanczyk was surfing the Internet when I came upon a map from 1772. This map was just as the first partition of Poland had occurred. This segment of the map was part of a PDF document from:

http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11294/#regions=europe&countries=PL

Entitled: “Map of Poland: Outlining Its Provinces and Voivodeships, 1772“. The document if 40.5MB and is 59 pages (about half of whom are blank pages). In 1772 the map segment shown above was in Sandomierskie wojewodztwo/voivodeship. The map is a bit blurry/grainy, so I had to annotate the section to show Pacanow and Szczucin and the river Vistula/Wisla between them. This segment is from the upper left of  page 43 of the PDF.

This map encompasses a large part of the area that blogs emphasizes from my genealogical research in the Russian-Poland partition (zabor). The area north of the Vistula will become part of the Russian Gubernia Kielce. The area below the Vistula becomes part of the Austrian-Partition, known as Galicia.

Knowing the geography of your ancestral villages (in my case Pacanow) can aid you in your genealogical research by identifying the civil administrative hierarchy that records the births, marriages, and deaths of the people. It can also help to locate parishes and in planning a proximity search for adjoining parishes that may also have records of your ancestors. So knowing the maps/geography can help the researcher locate data and the skilled use of Gazetteers can get you to your ancestral parish or parishes. Maps also show the changing borders over time and how the civil administrative hierarchies change over time.

A good genealogist will also be good at geography (as well as many other skills) in order to locate and read records of your family’s history.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 559 other followers

%d bloggers like this: