Archive for ‘Genealogy’

January 24, 2015

Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin?

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter had an interesting blog recently …

The premise, “Are There 1/2 Cousins?”, intrigued Stanczyk.

One of my pet peeves is a term that I see online over and over: someone claiming to be a “half first cousin” or a “half second cousin once removed” or something similar. Sorry folks, but there is no such thing as a “half first cousin” according to legal dictionaries. However, the term is used…

http://blog.eogn.com/2015/01/21/is-there-any-such-thing-as-a-half-cousin/

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January 23, 2015

Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro Augustine — #Genealogy of Albano-Italians

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

18710613_Birth13_MariaGiuseppeDiLazzaro_page1

page 1 of Birth Record 13

This week Stanczyk ventured far afield to … Castroregio. Where?

Exactly, I did not know where. My wife’s Great Grandmother, Mary Augustine was a Muslim !!! An Albanian Muslim. But when I started trying to find “Castorregio” [sic] from an USA record, I kept being shuttled off to Castroregio … Italy???

It turns out that the commune/settlement of Castroregio a part of Castrovillari in the Costenza Province in the region of Calabria, Italy. It is southern Italy up the pennisula north of the heel of the boot. It is also across the Adriatic Sea from Albania.

Ok, I accepted that fact. Now did FamilySearch.org have any online records/images of it? Yes. Their title:

Italy, Cosenza, Castroville. (Tribunale), 1866-1910URL:

Birth Record #13 — Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

I knew her father’s name was Diomede and that her birth date should be: 13 Jun 1871. These were from US records.

I had Mary Dellazarro for  name. The birth record said in the margin: Maria Giuseppe Di Lazzaro di Diomede

OK, so Mary was Maria and Maria’s middle name was Giuseppe. I was in the Civil Records for Castroregio in 1871. The final di Diomede was who her father was (his first name). Ok that was very good too. Diomede was not a common name. But how could I possibly know this was my Mary Dellalazzaro Augustine? The baby’s birth date was 13 Jun 1871 .  OK I was now certain I had the birth record of my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother. The birth date was an exact match from US records! This happens so seldom among my immigrant ancestors. It is usually a few days one way or another.

So now I had my wife’s maternal Great-Grandmother, Mary’s birth record from Italy. It was in the civil records and the religion was listed as unknown/none-followed (not Muslim, but I could accept that might not be a popular label). But these were Italians or so I thought. After all these were records from Calabria, Italy. Perhaps they had migrated from Albania at some point, but when?

I also had my wife’s 2x great-grandparent’s names: Diomede Di Lazzaro of course. But I also had Mary Todaro too. I’ll save the suspense for another time. I found Diomede & Mary ‘s marriage record too. So I had another generation’s names (3x great grandparents on both Di Lazzaro & Todaro sides). The marriage record also gave me the full birth date of both newlyweds too! Bonus. I like Italian records – more info than my usual Russian-Poland records.

How was I able to read the records? It was not quite the same as Latin (which I knew well enough from Poland). I also was a bit let down by my Hoffman & Shea book, “Following The Paper Trail“. The book did not have a sample of Italian paragraph form. Thankfully, I can read old handwriting pretty well and Google’s translator worked well too and I was reading Italian. The form was very similar to the Napoleon Codex form I was used to from the Russian-Poland records I routinely deal with.

Finally, Google found me several web sites that described the Albanian migration to Italy which was actually a reward to the Albanian hero-king, Skanderbeg! These people were Albanians and they still communicated in their language and even today you may see signs in two languages (Albanian & Italian) for the place names in this region. I also found a Lazzaro in Berat, Albania. It turns out that the TODARO family was in the retinue of the original Albanian Soldiers of Skanderbeg. They were one of forty families that had migrated from Albania about  400 years earlier! Many of these families were Christians too. It turns out they were Eastern Rite Catholics (Orthodox Catholics) due to their connection  Byzantium and Constantinople. Skanderbeg was Orthodox Catholic, then Muslim then converted back to Orthodox Catholic again – so  being Muslim or Catholic was not a problem for these Albanians. They were ALBANIAN (Arbëresh) and that and their connection to Skanderbeg was what mattered to them!

January 22, 2015

King Abdullah Has Passed — Crown Prince Salman Is King !

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

2015/01/img_0705.png

Crown Prince Salman is now King of Saudi Arabia!

King Abdullah died 22-January-2015 was born 1924 and had been the reigning monarch since 2005 when he replaced King Fahd.

King Salman takes over at a critical juncture; May God Bless his efforts.

January 22, 2015

Genealogy & Stamps ; Miscellanea In The Records — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

 

1870 Stamp in Civil Record Books for Castroregio, Italy

1870 Stamp in Civil Records

Stanczyk loves genealogy (hence this blog). But this jester also loves creative artwork in ephemera or like postage stamps. What I love best is when I see these things in church books while doing genealogy research.

I suppose this was the way to collect fees for church services or civil services. My first stamp is a recent find from the Kingdom of Italy, Calabria Province, Cosenza, village of Castroregio from 1870. I recently found 4 of my wife’s 3x great grandparents (only 28 more to go) in this village and its civil registration books. On the top of every facing pages (a two page set) on the right hand page at the top is this stamp. I only had a few years online in FamilySearch,org, so I do not know if the stamp changes over time. The man commemorated is King Victor Emmanuel II .

 

Poland 1949

Poland1949StampsThese two 5 zloty stamps are from Poland, post World War II. They were found on a 1949 Birth Extract of an 1887 birth of Wiktoria Heliasz born in Biechow.

 

 

Russian-Poland Stamps

twoStamps_1880A_smallTake a look at these two stamps. Your eyes are not fuzzy, the writing is Cyrillic characters and in the Russian language. These were from an 1880 Alegata Church Record. Notice the cancellation mark on the left stamp isan ‘X’ with the dual date:

17/29 August 1880

The dual dates are because Russia was on Julian Calendar, while Poland was on Gregorian Calendar and these were twelve days apart in 1880. It is nice that these online records were in color so you could see exactly how the stamps looked.

 

Austrian-Poland Stamps

1880Stamps_OnBaptismalCertificateThe above five stamps are from  Austrian-Poland partition. They were on an 1880 Baptismal Certificate. I love the Austrian Empire’s elaborate detail (hard to see in these stamps).

ColorAustrianPolandStamp

This next stamp is also from Austrian-Poland. It was on a 1904 Birth Extract with a stamp from 1898  – very nice color and detail shown.

 

 

 

 

 

An Alegata for citizens of two Empires

AustrianStamp_RussianStamp_1886The above two stamps are from the year 1886. It was taken from an 1886 Alegata where the groom was from Krosno in Galicia (Austrian Empire) and the Bride was from  Russian-Poland (Russian Empire). The testimony of baptism was used as proof that the couple could be married in the church. The 50 krone [left stamp] is the Austrian stamp and the 60 kopec [right stamp] was the Russian stamp. I guess each church collected a fee for this marriage to be documented. Latin & Cyrillic all mashed-up.

Because Stanczyk’s ancestors were on one side of the Vistula/Wisla River (Russian-Poland side) and the in-laws were south of the Vistula/Wisla River (Austrian-Poland side) these kind of marriages were somewhat common.  Just cross the bridge at Szczucin. I guess this kind of emigration was allowed by the two empires. The bride was most likely the immigrant (the groom had military duties to fulfill or taxes to pay or work to perform for some royal business).

 

Do not forget to examine the stamps they have a story to tell too.

Have you seen any interesting postage stamps in your research? Then drop me an email.


 

January 17, 2015

Jakob Eliasz, The First Pacanow Eliasz ? — #Genealogy #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

17971004_marr_EliaszJakob_PaszenskaSusanna

Jacob Eliasz married Susanna Parszenska on 4-October-1797 in Swiniary

Stanczyk’s direct paternal lineage goes through Pacanow, SwietoKrzyskie, Poland [powiat Buski, gmina Pacanow]. Today there numbers about 1275 people [source: mapa.szukaj.pl ]. Its parish, located in Pacanow is Sw. Marcin. The church has been honored as a basilica, by the Vatican. This region has been part of a few wojewodztwa, In the LDS Microfilm its located under Kielce wojewodztwo/gubernia with its records 1875-1905 written in Russian that means it was last in the Russian partition of Poland. Its records from the AP can be found online at GenBaza:

http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,52754,1

So  we have: C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon->Chester S. Eliasz->Joseph Eliasz->Jozef Elijasz->Marcin Eliasz (b. about 1819). So this blogger’s great-great-grandfather is Marcin Eliasz (aka Elijasz) born about 1819, as deduced from his death record in 1879 Pacanow [Akt #60]. So 1819 (or probably a bit earlier than that) is the oldest known direct ancestor from Pacanow. There are a few other lines that go back that far but they are not my direct line, nor even properly connected to our branch.

But recently while going through Swiniary parish, nearby to Pacanow, I found a marriage record from 1797 !  The groom was Jakob Eliasz age 40, from Pacanow (and House #1 too). Jakob was a widower. His age of 40 implies a birth year of about 1757. The birthplace is unknown for certain but it could have been Pacanow. His bride was Zuzanna Paszenska age 23, a maiden (her 1st marriage) and she lived in Oblekon village in Swiniary parish. The two witnesses were Franciszek Zyglicki [an affiliated family name] and the Economa of Huta Oblekon, Grzegorz Ciescelski. Ok, I cannot say with certainty that Jakob was in Pacanow from 1757, but DEFINITELY he lived in house #1 of  Pacanow in 1797 as a widower.

1797 Context

During these days (Jakub & Zuzanna), the history of Pacanow, it was after the third partition of Poland in January 1796. From every pulpit announced these areas were a part of the Austrian Emperor, Franz II ‘s empire. In this way Pacanow became part of the district of Stopnica [source:  http://pacanow.pl/page.php?kat=2&main=2&id=2 ].

Later, Pacanow was a part of the Duchy of Warsaw during Napoleon’s era until June 1815. Afterwards, the Congress of Vienna ceded the area to become part of the Polish Kingdom (aka Congress Poland) and part of the Russian Empire.

Earliest History

Pacanów was first mentioned in a church document from 1110 – 1117,  issued by the  Bishop of Kraków Maur, in which construction of St. Martin church was confirmed. At that time, the village probably belonged to a man named Siemian, who was also mentioned in the document. The existence of the parish church was confirmed on August 1219 by Bishop of Kraków Iwo Odrowąż .

In 1265, the village was granted Magdeburg rights by Prince Bolesław V, the Chaste. In the same period, a number of other local villages were also granted town charters (Połaniec, Nowy Korczyn, Koprzywnica and Opatowiec). The original charter of Pacanów has not been preserved, but in a document issued on February 26, 1603, King Zygmunt III Waza stated that Pacanow had been incorporated as a town in 1265.

Jakub & Zuzanna Eliasz

Past experience has shown that house #1 is usually the nearest to the church and sometimes denotes a person of some means. So perhaps 40 years  old Jakob was a “catch” for the 23 year old Zuzanna. Perhaps my direct lineage run through Jakob and Zuzanna. But, what is certain is they are earliest documented ELIASZ [Eliaszow] in Pacanow. Now can I find some distant cousin who is descended from Jakob & Zuzanna?

January 16, 2015

RAOGK is Back — #Genealogy #Volunteer #Collaborate

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RAOGK

RAOGK (Random Acts Of Genealogical Kindness) is back. Their website raogk.org is trying to rebuild the database of volunteers. The RAOGK pages on Facebook appear to be unconnected but were created to fill the void when RAOGK.org disappeared a few years ago.

Welcome back back RAOGK!  If any of you are Polonia in the USA or are from Poland, then email me and I’ll note it here in the blog. In my day, I too was a RAOGK volunteer.

Now you can provide raogk via Facebook groups (and yes even through the old Yahoo Groups that pre-dated Facebook), volunteer to do indexing through a local society or through FamilySearch.org, (or other Indexing projects, like Ancestry’s World Archives Project). I have been a part of many of those too as well hanging out in Rootsweb/Ancestry forums.

Genealogy is collaborative. If you can go back 30+ generations (less if you are Polish like this blogger), then you are related to me and you  are helping family. At least that is how I think about it. Also many have paid me this kindness, how can I not pay it forward too?

Collaborate … Volunteer its good for you and for all.


January 8, 2015

Philadelphia — Genealogy Roadshow #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealogy Roadshow Philly

January 27th 2015 • Philadelphia

PBS has brought Genealogy Roadshow back ; As the image shows, they filmed in Philadelphia, October 25 & 26th in 2014.  Now the show airs again; its premier is Tuesday, January 13th. This season Philadelphia gets the treatment.

Philadelphia – Franklin Institute (January 27th at 8:00 p.m.). At Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute, a team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family histories. A man learns that the event that drove his family to the City of Brotherly Love changed the course of history; a man may be a Viking descendant; another’s family could have part of one of history’s biggest scams; a young man hopes to confirm his relation to a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and two sisters learn their ancestors were part of the great Irish migration.

Now I know they were at the Historical Society of PA (HSP). So I hope that survives the edit process too. At any rate, I’ll be watching the 27th of January at 8:00 pm ET.


January 4, 2015

Dimunitive Dionizy — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Yesterday, Stanczyk wrote about Polish Name Days. The article got a bit longish. So  I left out an example, but I wanted to write briefly about names some more. So here is my diminutive example.

Dionizy – Whose derivation undoubtedly comes from the Greek Name: Dionysus. When I found Dionizy’s birth record (29-MARCH-1852 in Strozyska, Swietokrzyskie [old Kielce Gubernia], Poland, in Strozyska parish, 1852 Births, Akt #28) it was written as DYONIZY Stanislaw.

Using link #4 from yesterday (http://diminutive-names.com/) we see:

Dionizy
Danek, Dioncio, Dionek, Dionizulcio, Dionizulek, Dionizuszek, Dionizuś, Dionuś, Dyziek, Dyzio, Dyziu

Dionizy Stanislaw Slawinski.  Now Stanislaw, the middle name in America that acquired the diminutive form of STOSH. Stosh seemed to  acquire Kleenix or Xerox status in that it was used as a way to refer to any Polish male (whether or not his name was actually  Stanislaw/Stanislaus/Stanley or not). I noticed Stosh is not listed as a diminutive.

Let this jester do one more name near and dear to his heart. ELIASZ is the Polish name derived from the Hebrew Prophet Elijah in the Old Testament of the Bible. This name is used as a first name and a last name. It is also a Christian name and a Jewish name (and certainly used in the Muslim world too). So much confusion occurs tracing the ELIASZ surname.  Here are the diminutive forms:

Eliasz

Eja, Elek, Eli, Eliasio, Eliaszek, Elijah, Eliotto, Elis, Eliś, Eljot, Elliot, Elsio, Eluniek, Eluś, Laszek

Let me finish with a final thought on Polish names. Many Polish surnames wind up getting ‘Americanized’. What I mean by that  can be best demonstrated by my own research examples.

I have ELIASZ (in St. Louis MO, related to WWI War Hero) change to ELLIS [currently not connected to this jester]. More directly, in my family is the use of the Name Change. Our own surname was changed to ELIASZ-SOLOMON (thus insuring confusion for future genealogists). Still very ethnic. How about Sobieszczanski becoming Sobb? We also see Leszczynski become Lester and Laskey or Lescinski. This last-name evolution needs someone to write long-read blog article upon. We should also build a dictionary of Polish Name Evolution in America. This would require the help of MANY genealogists to get a large enough coverage to be a useful tool. Otherwise this will be a problem akin to that of women who marry and take their husband’s name. A genealogic lost trail that requires a critical document to pick up the trail again.

Something to Muse upon.


December 23, 2014

Christmas Wish #2014 — #Polish #Genealogy #Tradition

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

XmasWishStanczyk wanted to wish all the best of the Season’s Greeting !

— So today’s blog article is what I wish for us genealogists.

 

Wishes

  1. That bloggers add, “#genealogy” and “#Polish” (or whatever specialty) to their blog titles and/or their body of their blogs, Facebook posts, Twitter tweets. You may have noticed this author adds “#Genealogy” at the end of my blog titles. The reason being is these articles are shared with: Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, & LinkedIn. These hashtags help researchers find our stuff in Google/Bing/Yahoo search engines. I feel the #Polish is vitally important for other genealogy researchers  to find us. Please try and add this to your social posts.
  2. That people join Polish Genealogical Societies.
  3. That people try to perform one act of genealogical kindness or partake in one genealogy project each year. Genealogy is perhaps the one research that benefits most from “crowd-sourcing” or other collaboration.
  4. In Jonathan Shea’s book, Going Home , he lists in Appendix A, Polish Parishes around the USA. Almost every state has one or more. Can we all go around to the nearest local Polish church and photograph and index the names on the tombstones/headstones from the cemeteries with the dates? Email whatever you get to Stanczyk (click on image) and I will see it gets to PGSCT&NE for their project and/or post on the web in this blog or elsewhere as appropriate. This will enable all to find the data via web searches.
  5. That Polish bloggers, journals/e-zines and newspapers cross refer each other to their readers. I know I will do a Polish Newspaper column in January in this blog. Of course, my blog roll refers you readers to other Polish Blogs too.

Does anybody else have any good suggestions for wishes? Email me or Comment on this blog article.

Wesołych Świąt i Szczęśliwego Nowego Roku !


 

 

 

December 22, 2014

1772 Polish Wojewodztwo, Diocese, and Deaconates — #Polish #Genealogy #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_ParishesInPoland_mapXVIsegmentStanczyk is busy with holiday chores, including wishing you, my dear readers a Happy Holidays & a Happy, Healthy New Year too. As most regular readers know, I spend a lot of my time writing about genealogy with a focus on Polish genealogy and in particular in the geographical areas surrounding my paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages (Biechow & Pacanow in old wojewodztwa Kieleckie, now a part of SwietoKrzyskie woj.). Like most areas in and around Eastern /Central Europe the borders change … frequently. So today’s blog article is about 1772 just before the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth was partitioned amongst the neighboring empires (you know who you are/were, you Black Eagle Empires).

It is interesting to note that Pacanow was a much more important regional village in 1772. It was in fact, a deaconate, subordinate to the diocese of Krakow in the Gniezno Wojewodztwa. At that time, there were only two Wojewodztwo (Provinces): Gniezno in the west and Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg, Leopolis, the city of Lions in whatever language) in the east. Any other wojewodztwo were in the Lithuanian portion of the Commonwealth. So the civil/religious hierarchy of the time was: Poland->Gniezno->Krakow->Pacanow, which  along with Opatowiec deaconate contained most of the villages this author writes about [you might be tempted to toss in Polaniec and Sandomierz too]. That area is shown in the map at the top. I do a lot of research for my family in the above map, west of Polaniec and south of Pinczow (the lower/left quadrant) in almost every parish north of the Vistula (Wisla) river I have located a record for someone in my family tree  —  you might say, the bones of Stanczyk’s DNA are rooted here.

So let me enumerate the parishes from this 1772 map that are present in my genealogy:

Biechow & Pacanow (grandparents), Stopnica, Ksziaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Olesnica, Szczebrzusz, Beszowa, Opatowiec, Busko and probably another 8-9 other villages with a person here or there. I think Solec too, but I have not found that record yet. I also a few stray, unconnected family records from Szczucin (the only parish south of the Vistula … so far). Are these in your bones too? Drop me a line in the New Year and we can compare family trees.

By the way, this research is from the PGSA’s CD-ROM, “The Latin Church in the Polish Commonwealth in 1772” [ISBN – 978-0-924207-12-9 ].

December 12, 2014

Royalty — The Dynasty Continues … #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GrimaldiTree

10 – December – 2014

The House Grimaldi was founded in 1160 AD with Grimaldo Canelli. Such a long lived and august dynasty deserves much attention and so …
Stanczyk would like to announce the latest royals to be born …

PARIS (AP) – Each newborn got 21 cannon shots, the bells tolled for 15 minutes and the air filled with the sound of boat horns when Monaco’s royal twins were born. And everyone in the tiny principality gets a day off to celebrate.
“I wish to share this moment of happiness with the Monegasque people and more widely with all my country’s residents,” new father Prince Albert II said Thursday.

Princess Charlene gave birth Wednesday to little Gabriella and Jacques, the 28th generation in the dynasty. Long live the Grimaldi Line!


 

December 7, 2014

1772 Map of Poland’s Wojewodztwo (Provinces) — #Map #Genealogy #Poland

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_Woj_Sandomierski

Today, Stanczyk was surfing the Internet when I came upon a map from 1772. This map was just as the first partition of Poland had occurred. This segment of the map was part of a PDF document from:

http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11294/#regions=europe&countries=PL

Entitled: “Map of Poland: Outlining Its Provinces and Voivodeships, 1772“. The document if 40.5MB and is 59 pages (about half of whom are blank pages). In 1772 the map segment shown above was in Sandomierskie wojewodztwo/voivodeship. The map is a bit blurry/grainy, so I had to annotate the section to show Pacanow and Szczucin and the river Vistula/Wisla between them. This segment is from the upper left of  page 43 of the PDF.

This map encompasses a large part of the area that blogs emphasizes from my genealogical research in the Russian-Poland partition (zabor). The area north of the Vistula will become part of the Russian Gubernia Kielce. The area below the Vistula becomes part of the Austrian-Partition, known as Galicia.

Knowing the geography of your ancestral villages (in my case Pacanow) can aid you in your genealogical research by identifying the civil administrative hierarchy that records the births, marriages, and deaths of the people. It can also help to locate parishes and in planning a proximity search for adjoining parishes that may also have records of your ancestors. So knowing the maps/geography can help the researcher locate data and the skilled use of Gazetteers can get you to your ancestral parish or parishes. Maps also show the changing borders over time and how the civil administrative hierarchies change over time.

A good genealogist will also be good at geography (as well as many other skills) in order to locate and read records of your family’s history.

December 5, 2014

The Sad Saga Of The Tsarnaevich — Continuing Story

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

We are one year and eight months into this saga. Recently, I thought I would survey if there were additional stories regarding this saga that flew under national radar and went unnoticed in its reporting.

For example, I asked if a death certificate was issued for Tamerlan Tsarnaev.  One had been in May 2013.

We see that Tamerlan was reported to have been born: 21-October-1986, in Elista Kalmykia, in Kyrgyzstan, Russian [Federation] to Anzor Tsarnaev & Zubiedat Suleimanova. The informant was Ruslan Tsarni [an uncle].

Death Certificate

tsarnaevTamerlan_DeathCertificate_20130419 [PDF document]

 

See Also …

Tsarnaev/Boston Flipboard Curated Magazine

Tsarnaev Genealogy 

The Sad Saga Of The Tsarnaevich


 

 

 

 

 

December 4, 2014

GenBaza News – New OnLine Records … #Polish #Genealogy #Genealogia #Polska

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk noted the news from Genbaza over the last two weeks:

Please note the phrase, “dostęp tylko dla indeksujących” means only access to indexes (for indexing?). So it appears we will be getting some new data (and/or images) online very soon.

Some of the parishes/cities are given first in Polish followed by their German name (i.e. Prussian-Poland partition). An example is:  Mierzyn [pl] – Alt Marrin [de]

Here is what they are working on …

 

Nowości w GenBazie

2014-12-02 dodałem — do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących
USC Sowno – Zowen
USC Mierzyn – Alt Marrin
USC Stanomino – Standenmin

2014-11-30 — do katalogu AP Kielce (dostęp tylko dla indeksujących)
Książnica Wielka 1699-1906
Kurzelów 1733-1913
Pierzchnica 1875-1913
Tarłów 1810-1873

2014-11-29 — do katalogu AP Gdańsk zindeksowane USC
USC Okalice
USC Leźno
USC Konarzyny Kościerskie – uzupełnienie

2014-11-28  — do katalogu AP Kielce
uzupełnienia Parafii Odrowąż (1909-1912) [Editor. – Parish Supplement]

— do katalogu AP Grodzisk
Grodziec 1909-1912
Czerwińsk alegaty 1808-1822
Leszno alegaty 1826-1837
Nieporęt 1907r
Zaborów alegaty 1855r
Izdebna alegaty 1816 i 1819r
Grodzisk Mazowiecki alegaty 1808-1825

— do katalogu AP Koszalin_index – dostęp tylko dla indeksujących/Zugriff nur für die Indizierung
USC Smęcino – Schmenzin
USC Spore – Sprasse
USC Stare Drawsko – Drahim
USC Stary Chwalim – Valm


Good Luck Hunting!

November 25, 2014

Ancestry App version 6.2 is Released — #Genealogy #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk noted a new release of the Ancestry.com’s app.

Ancestry App version 6.2

In time for thanksgiving, Ancestry, released version 6.2. It looks like they added two features:

  1. Quickly add photos / documents from iCloud and/or Dropbox.
  2. Discover historical events that shaped your ancestor’s lives.

I get the first feature. It leaves me feeling, “meh”. It adds something for some people that have their photos in the cloud (despite all of the security concerns). For me this is a not-going-to-be-used, app “bloat-ware” feature added by some mobile programmer trying to shore up his/her resume.

The second feature is apparently Ancestry trying too add a widget to your daily notifications. I really see that feature  as less than “meh”. It is almost a negative feature in my eyes.

As far as I am concerned this version of the app, you can pass on. Nothing here. Don’t waste your bandwidth, unless you actually use iCloud or Dropbox to store your genealogy images / documents.

I like to keep my images on the phone, in case you cannot reach the Internet in some building (say a courthouse) where the Internet is blocked by wiring or other building materials. No Internet,  will not deter me, I just have my photos organized for quick location on my phone. If its up on a cloud and you have no access to the Internet for some reason  (or your cloud has crashed) then you cannot access the document when you need it and are out mobile doing some genealogy research in some remote location you cannot return again for a long time. But maybe you store pics of your ancestors (and not critical documents in the cloud) and you use that to add a pic to your tree one time. That might be ok, for people with large trees with 10,000+ people whose pics you do not want to clutter your phone with. So I am just “meh” about this upgrade.

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November 24, 2014

Consanguinity & DNA Probabilities — #Genealogy #DNA #Kinship

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk last wrote a similarly named article, “Genealogy Consanguinity & DNA“, on 25-August-2014. But in the last week, I read two blogs that made me rethink some of the comments that we received to the blog on the probabilities of autosomal DNA (the non Y-DNA and non mt-DNA). I also read a blog once by William Dollarhide that a Family Tree should represent the DNA, the Consanguinity (how much blood shared). Although I respect the tremendous body of work and prolonged expertise of Mr. Dollarhide, my immediate reaction  was, “No, it does NOT”!

So today’s blog is a mash-up of my August 25th blog, two recent blogs I read, and William Dollarhide’s blog article on the Family Tree represents the DNA.

First off, let me state my bias up front, that I believe the Family Tree represents Legally Defined Familial Relationships as held out by the Family Tree’s owner and that copies or derivative versions or edited/annotated versions are NOT valid! There has been a long history from at least the earliest dynasties of the Pharaohs and probably even older than that the “king”, let me gender-neutral the term, the monarch decides who is family and who is erased from family histories and who inherits and who does not inherit. So we see a very early reason why family trees ARE legal based. If the wife of the monarchical family could not produce a LEGAL heir to inherit or continue the dynasty, one was often adopted or perhaps produced with a surrogate spouse. So we also have a new counter argument enter on very early in the history of families … adoptions. The adopted child may or may not possess some consanguineous blood (DNA). It was not unusual for children of siblings to be adopted if they were orphaned. Or perhaps we can view more upheaval from recent times producing ad-hoc adoptions of non-kin. We need not just accept the modern day gay-couples who adopt or couples with fertility issues who perhaps adopt an overseas child , who may or may not share any consanguinity with either parent, but are none-the-less, legal family members of a family and as such should be in the family tree. We can easily recall just the upheaval of World War II where children from Jewish families were often times ad-hoc adopted in order to save the child’s life and perhaps raised to adulthood without the knowledge of their true DNA (until later). There have been many such stories.

DNA was a late 20th century discovery, so before its discovery, there was simply no way of knowing for sure that a baby arriving from its mother’s womb, was the sire of any man in particular. Here, again we find examples of mistakenly assumed child of both parents, has the DNA of the mother, but none of the father. Yet in most cases, the family tree shows the child with the couple who raised the child and were held out to be its parents (legally).

We have also seen people use a last name to pretend or to get others to think they are from a family. I am thinking now of a man who used the Rockerfeller name when he had no consanguinity with the famous family. There have also been people who claim to have been a long-lost member of the executed Romanov family. But these people are not legally related to the more famous families by their covert or overt claims of familial ties. They are not to be represented in any LEGALLY sanctioned family tree of their creation, nor anyone else’s with those famous families. These faux family members could be EXCLUDED on the basis of DNA in all probability.

We come back to the PROBABILITY portion of this article. DNA and what are the probabilities of consanguineous relatives in the autosomal DNA (not in the direct paternal or maternal lines which can be mathematically determined with reasonable accuracy). When I wrote the blog article from August 25th, people began to immediately take issue with the data visualization that I had sourced on the autosomal boxes. For example, should siblings be 50% consanguineous? In most probabilities, yes. Now let me limit probabilities where by the mother and father are both known for certain — otherwise the mathematics goes out the window.

So siblings share 50% correct? What about identical twins? Who may or may not be 100% identical in DNA. What about fraternal twins or any of the other myriad multiples that can be conceived of? Oh, their DNA probabilities are likely much higher than siblings born from separate births, maybe approaching 100% shared DNA. So now the probabilities of consanguinity are skewed for future generations depending on which child you are in direct lineage from.

Autosomal ProbabilitiesWhat is the accepted standard for probabilities? I recently read a blog by Iowa DNA Project. She included a chart from The International Society of Genetic Genealogists. I have included that chart in this article.

The chart answers most of the questions from people on my first blog that I was not able to answer definitively. Notice one caveat to those probabilities !  These are what we can EXPECT as the probabilities for shared consanguinity.

Why are they not guaranteed? Well the first answer occurred to me because of my knowledge of genetic algorithms (and high school science). The first answer is Mutations. Sometimes when the genes copied from one parent or the other, an inexact copy results in the DNA sequence. There are also a few other things that can go wrong in the sequence.

That is perhaps a nice segue to the second blog I read recently, “Why Your DNA Might NOT Match Your Parents“. This article is actually from July 3rd of this year, but which I read last week. What happens when the mother has a rare condition called Chimerism? A short explanation is the mother has two fertilized eggs in her womb, but then one twin fuses to the other and only a single baby develops and is born. In this case, the baby does NOT share DNA with the mother who is in fact the biological mother but technically shares zero consanguinity with the baby. Now Chimerism is rare but since it has happened recently, it is likely it has happened in the past (albeit rarely) of humankind. Well that really screws up the DNA. Now if you were a direct line descendant from a Chimera baby, your DNA does not match the DNA of the rest of the  family. Let that sink in.

Now without even discussing surrogate mothers or other elaborate fertility techniques or even parthenogenesis, I believe I have completely destroyed the William Dollarhide notion of a family tree being a representation of DNA (or consanguinity). I did not even touch upon infidelity, “kings-privilege”, rape/incest/forced insemination or other known or unknown “ad-hoc adoptions” that occur in family trees with/without knowledge of the family members [since DNA and its use is recent and not widely used]. Nor did we discuss legal  dis-owning or disinheritance until this sentence. Those too would impact a family tree.

Perhaps all Family Trees really are Legally Defined Familial Relationships as held out by the family tree owner! Whether we agree or not or whether we know/believe it or not, the long process of DNA replication and historical/legal edicts have irretrievably altered all of our family trees.

The author wishes to include a post-scriptum on his own Legally Defined Familial Relationships (aka my Family Tree). As for my dear wife, Teréza & I, we felt the need to utilize extreme fertility techniques  in our personal life to produce our own biological children. We have also used legal disownments, disinheritance, name changes and an annulment to separate ourselves from others who have sought to make fraudulent claims of familial status … asserted fraudulent relationships in their own utterances:   for purposes of past, present and/or future schemes to possibly gain money from me, my wife, Teréza  or any future estate and/or cause us harm and other damages!

November 19, 2014

FOUND: Another Genealogist Reconnected to their Ancestral Parish: Pacanów

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

JanMazur_Record214

214 | Mazur | Jan | Żabiec

Stanczyk was in Ancestry.com ‘s forums when I read:

My great grandfather, Jan Mazur (b. 22 Oct 1894) left Żabiec for Hamburg where he boarded the ship Amerika in 1911 and then landed in NYC some time the following year. He married my great grandmother in 1916. He was said to either own or manage a bar in Massachusetts. He died on 27 May 1938, two years after naturalizing.

I have not been able to find any information about his life in Poland. I was told that his mother’s name was Agneiszka (b. ~1870) but his father’s name remains a mystery. Some relatives believe she may not have been married or was widowed shortly after Jan’s birth. We believe he had at least one brother (possibly named Michael) but we have no idea if he stayed in Żabiec or if he also left at some point. Also, it’s been passed down that Agneiszka was at some point involved with a man named Wojciech Zytr. I would love to know if she found happiness with him and if there were any children. Sadly, my grandfather and his older brother have passed away and so any knowledge they had is now lost.

However, I’ve refused to give up hope that I will one day find out if my great grandfather was from Żabiec and if he had family that he left behind. I would love to find out where Jan got his last name from and I want to know what happened to Agneiszka as well.

So, my purpose for posting this message here: Has anyone ever come across information about Mazurs in Żabiec? Or does anyone have a suggestion for where I could potentially find information about my ancestors? I would be so grateful for any response.

So I went to GenBaza in order to aid her. In record 214 (upper left on image), Her great-grandfather Jan Mazur was born in Żabiec. √-Check on Żabiec being the birthplace. The birthdate is 22-November-1894. So the birthday is a very close match, the day and year match and the month is one month later than remembered (November instead of October).

His (Jan the baby whose birth is documented in the picture above) father was Wojciech Mazur, age 30 and his mother was Agnieszka Żyła age 20 (=> a birth of about 1864).  √-Check on mom’s name fitting her family tale, including the approximate birth year.

The witnesses were: Jozef Duponka, age 46 and Wojciech Gurniak age 36.

The God Parents were: Jozef Duponka & Marianna Gurniak.

As for the mystery man named Wojciech Zytr. I propose that the man was Wojciech Mazur (the father). and that Zytr is a corruption/combination of Mazur and Zyla. Especially when you consider that the slashed-l looks a lot like a ‘t’ .

What does “Mazur, Jan”,  look like in Cyrillic (Russian):

MazurJan_InRussianCyrillic


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November 15, 2014

2014 New Years Resolutions … How Did I Do? #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Now that the year is almost 11/12ths over I thought I would reflect back upon my genealogical goals for 2014.

What did I get  accomplished from my …

2014 Resolutions

  1. Rejoin or Renew my genealogical society memberships.  PGSM, PGSA, PGSCT&NE look for my membership fees. I think I will also join WNYGS (Western  NY Genealogical Society) in hopes of doing some Buffalo area research in 2014.

[ 3 for 4; Not Bad. Next Year WNYGS ! ]

  1. Nice segue. I will research the tombstone I found of “Frank Leszczynski” 1866-1943. His birth year and death year are very close to my Frank Leszczynski. How many Frank Leszczynski born in 1860’s can there be? When you factor in he was buried in the St. Augustine cemetery in Lancaster, Erie County, NY then that ratchet ups the probabilities as he lived in Erie County, NY the entire time he lived in the USA and St Augustine was a family church. He was alive in the 1940 US Census so I knew he died after 1940. This tombstone fits the known facts for my Frank Leszczynski — so I resolve to call St Augustine and get the info for this gravesite/tombstone at their cemetery and verify one way or the other if Frank is my grand-uncle.

[ I called (716) 683-5031. No further info beyond tombstone inscription  and grave location:    Row 8, Grave 29; I think I still want to visit the cemetery in 2015. ]

  1. I want to find any info on Frank’s brother John/Jan Leszczynski. He too lived in/around Buffalo. That WNYGS is looking more vital to my needs in 2014.

[ Thanks to Ancestry.com I was able to locate Jan Leszczynski’s son: Jan P. Leszczynski, whose name was so badly mangled I would not have recognized him as an ancestor, except on the form his next of kin was a brother I knew living at an address I knew. So now I knew that Jan served in the Canadian AEF in World War I. I did not expect that. He may have also spent some time in Toledo with his brother Wladyslaw too, away from  Rochester, NY ]

  1. I will register for the United Polish Genealogical Societies too. I miss all my genealogical buddies.

[ Registered and attended thanks to my wife Tereza, who made this trip happen for me! Met old friends, made new friends, made some new finds in Gawlikowski, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Gronek, and Vespek lines. ]

  1. I want to take some info from Roots Tech 2012 and look deeper now that I have other online resources available. Specifically, the GRONEK and Ozarow/Uzarow families. As a result of Ceil Wendt-Jensen mentioning a FamilySearch.org database having more records than were in Ancestry, I was able to find some new MI records from the Old Man’s WWII Draft. This led me on the GRONEK record to cross-analyze with GENETEKA indexes for STOPNICA and what do you know I confirmed that generation and added/confirmed the names for two more generations of GRONEK. I now realize that I had noted a Piotr GRONEK in LDS microfilm that pertains to this research from the 2012 Roots Tech research trip. I know the Microfilm #, the parish, the year and the Akt#. I just need to get the picture.   [STOPNICA, 1880 Births, Akt # 191, Piotr Gronek, MF# 1807635 in Russian/Cyrillic]

[ Actually thanks to GenBaza, I was able to push back Gronek line two more generations. ]

  1. Ola Heska mentioned on Facebook the need to make a donation to the PTG. I love those guys and their website and databases. So I will make a second donation to them. I once donated 10 $USD to them before METRYKI and GENETEKA. This year I resolve to donate 100 PL  to the PTG for METRYKI. I will beg them to add Pacanow and Stopnica to METRYKI too.

[missed]

  1. Visit Buffalo, specifically the Grosvenor Room of Buffalo & Erie County Public Library.

[missed]

  1. Try to get some USCIS papers (A/C files) for my Eliasz grandparents and maybe a couple Wlecial too.

[missed, although I do have the process down]

  1. Go to Poland. A Genealogical Trip to Kielce (AP and Diocessan Archive too), Biechow & Pacanow villages/churches. I know this one is a bit of a stretch, requiring  good timing and a lot of things to fall into place between now and the trip.

[missed]

  1. Find Walerya Leszczynska ‘s birth record in Biechow? Her brother Michael (aka Mikolaj). Church records for Frank and John (the ones above) too!

[ Huge Success found my grandmother Walerya, her brother, Mikolaj/Michael in Biechow, and marriage record for their half-brother  Jan/John in Stopnica, and Franciszek/Frank’s marriage in Biechow,  all in GenBaza. ]

  1. Find my wife, Teréza’s,  paternal grandparent’s marriage records. I am hoping to find their Ketubah (marriage contract) … at Rodeph Shalom.

[missed]

  1. Assuming, I am successful on #11, then I want to learn to read Hebrew, so I can translate, my wife’s grandparent’s Ketubah for her and our sons. Heritage!

Ok,  I did pretty well on my 2014 resolutions; now lets see how many resolutions in 2015 I can keep. I will probably carry some of these over to 2015. How did you do? Only six more weeks to go people !  I am thankful for my gains.

October 25, 2014

Family History Library – Teaches Russian Handwriting Classes — #Genealogy #Polish #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Waleria Leszczynska

If your family originates from Poland, … the partition that was under Russian Empire rule:

  • Eastern Poland
  • Ukraine
  • Belarus
  • Lithuania
  • The Jewish Pale
  • Western Russia (formerly Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth)
  • Modern day Russian Federation or other former Russian Empire territories

then you need to be aware that the Family History Library has developed and will be teaching a class in Reading Russian Handwriting (and Printing) this November. It is a four-part class and open to all for free. Each class is two hours long.

The dates are Wednesdays:  November  5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th in classroom B2 starting at 2:00pm  (MT). 8 Hours of free Russian Handwriting instruction.

Classes will be taught by Dennis Everett .

For more details, see the FamilySearch Blog .

 

Stanczyk hopes the classes will be videotaped and posted on the Internet for those of us unable to go to Salt Lake City, UT this November [2014].

Family History Library can you make this a podcast or iTunes Class for downloading?


 

October 17, 2014

Genealogy Roadshow — Philadelphia … #Genealogy , #Media . #TV

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

GenealogyRoadshow_Philly

Stanczyk enjoys PBS and Genealogy. PBS has the excellent series Antique Roadshow so why not a Genealogy Roadshow? This is another fine genealogical series that complements the excellent work by Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr (Finding Your Roots).

Well the PBS crew, featuring  genealogists Kenyatta D. Berry, Joshua Taylor and Mary Tedesco are coming to Philadelphia, October 25th and 26th to film. This will be broadcast during the winter season coming up.

You can attend this event too. The details are on the Genealogy Roadshow website .

For those unfamiliar with Philadelphia genealogy, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP). will be featured. Many of the founding families have their genealogies recorded in book-form in a lovely room chock full of leather bound books of family histories.

#GenealogyPBS

October 15, 2014

Wordless Wednesday — Searching For O Z A R O W I C Z #Meme , #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Uzarowicz_CYRYLLICStanczyk  —  has a great-grandmother, Aniela Major / Majer who was the daughter or Marcin Major and Katazyna Ozarowicz. I have found some Major in church records. But, as yet I have been unable to locate Ozarowicz records that connect to my family tree.

At the top is an image, of the OZAROWICZ  (aka Uzarowicz) name as written in Russian/Cyrillic. My Ozarowicz were from Biechow parish (of Stopnica area in the old wojewodztwo Kielce). So today, I am announcing in this blog that I am searching for Ozarowicz from Biechow area.

Click on my Stanczyk  image and drop me an electronic missive if you are one or know one. Thanks!

October 1, 2014

Polish American Heritage Month — 2014 #Genealogy , #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Calendar_October_Polish

#WordlessWednesday — The above is a historical calendar for Polish Events in October. So I thought it was perfect for kicking off Polish American Heritage Month.

 

Also, Stanczyk wanted to mention that this month also has an important museum opening in New York City, NY.

MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF POLISH JEWS announce its Grand Opening on OCTOBER 28, 2014

The museum will open with eight galleries and span the 1,000 history of Jewish Life in Poland. The press-release provides further details. For more info CONTACT: info@taubephilanthropies.org . In time for Polish American Heritage Month!

 

 

September 23, 2014

Finding Your Roots — #Genealogy , #TV

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

FYR_PBSFinding Your Roots by Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.  returns to PBS tonight. The first episode features:

  • Stephen King
  • Gloria Reuben
  • Courtney B. Vance

What’s their connection? Tune in tonight on PBS.

 

— A Stanczyk favorite


 

August 31, 2014

75th Anniversary of the Invasion of Poland — #History #Molotov–Ribbentrop-Pact

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19390901-german-army-attacks-polandDateline  September 1, 1939 —

Nine days ago, on August 23rd, 1939, Nazi Germany & Soviet Russia signed a Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact, formally known as the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.  This was a foreshadow to war.  If you were expecting a Labor Day blog then you are mistaken; Not this year. It has been exactly 75 years since World War II began with the invasion of Poland.

The 20th Century’s most heinous death sprees: World War II, The Holocaust, The Korean War and The Cold War are an era when between 30 Million-nearly 100 Million were killed, some genocidally. Truly a century of madness.

start-WorldWarIIBut it started with the fifth partition of Poland. FIVE ??? Yes, I said five partitions. The first three partitions (zabiory) in 1772, 1793, 1795 were by: Prussia, Austria, and Russia. These are the reason we see: Ger-Poland, Rus-Poland or Aus-Poland in the US Census during the Great Migration era 1870-1920. This jester likens Napoleon’s Duchy of Warsaw as the 4th partition (1807-1815). So when the Nazis and Soviets invade Poland in 1939 to form the General Government, with its Districts: Warsaw, Radom Lublin, and Krakow (2 years hence, 1941 with Operation Barbarosa,  also Galicia) we arrive at the fifth partition.

Stanczyk, mentions those 4 or 5 Districts (Distrikts) as they are important to interpret the administrative hierarchy for the vital records between 1939-1945. It was the same in the prior four partitions of Poland that administrative hierarchy changes occurred.

The largest  civil administrative division, what Americans might think of as Province/State was variously known, depending on partition as:  Provinz/Kreis, Wojewodztwo, Gubernia, Departament and Distrikt. Knowing the civil administrative hierarchy is important in locating your ancestor’s village.

Let’s hope that Russia’s annexation of the Crimean peninsula and the support of the Russian Rebels in Ukraine and the Syrian Civil War giving rise to the fascist Islamic State is not the beginning of the 21st century of madness. Think !


August 28, 2014

Ancestry.com App Turns 6.0 — #Genealogy #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry just released their newest version of their mobile application.

Ancestry App

Well testing was brief and then interrupted by Ancestry not being available (to the app; Ancestry.com was ok via the laptop).

 

The interface was lovely, but the constant tinkering with the interface is confusing the end users (at least this end user, who is a professional IT worker) and not intuitive at all.

The speed I could not test with my small tree. But it will reload your tree data  from the website, so something in the data / model must have changed for the app.

 

More  to come when the App can reach the website .. reliably.

 


 

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August 25, 2014

Genealogy Consanguinity & DNA — #Genealogy #DNA #Kinship

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealogy_Consanguinity
Consanguinity Chart Now … by John J. Tierney used via CC rights

 This is a beautiful data visualization tool of “relatedness” (Consanguinity) between yourself and an ancestor/descendant. Stanczyk loves good #STEM.  Mr. Tierney modified his excellent chart to add, “What percentage of DNA do you share with your family members”.

Kinship is characterized by the sharing of a common ancestor(s).  Consanguinity is derived from its Latin root:   consanguineous ∴  “of common blood”.

Today, I wanted to use this excellent chart to talk about the three types of Genealogical DNA tests:

 mtDNA

Y-DNA

autosomal DNA

mtDNA / Y-DNA

This way a genealogist can determine for him/her-self what benefit each type of DNA testing offers. mtDNA is for tracing the matrilineal line (your mother/maternal side). Y-Chromosome is for tracing your patrilineal line (aka surname tracing) or your father’s side. These two dnas are for tracing direct descent as these sex-based chromosomes are copied identically from one generation to the next, not half/half as the autosomal dna chromosome’s dna. Correctly, said the mutations in mtDNA and Y-DNA are more infrequent than the non-sex based genome (i.e. autosome) and they are not mixed like the other 22 chromosome’s dna. If you follow the blue arrows (in the diagram) up/down your family tree that is your linear descent; so you mtDNA to trace your mother’s side and use YDNA to trace your father’s side to your proverbial mitochondrial-Eve or your Y-Adam. You are testing for the blue boxes in our diagram.

So what is autosomal DNA?

Genealogy_Consanguinity_dna1

Inside Red Lines – are autosomal DNA generations.

The autosomal DNA are the dna from the other 22 non-sex chromosomes pairs. Autosomal DNA testing is a genealogical DNA test that uses either autosomal STRs or autosomal SNPs. (STR’s are Short Tandem Repeats; SNPs are single-nucleotide polymorphisms.) However, testing companies do not currently offer autosomal STRs tests that use enough STR markers for genealogy. The preferred choice for both genealogy and ethnic population matching is microarray chips that use hundreds of thousands of autosomal SNPs.

Mathematically, speaking you need at least six generations back before you get enough certainty(99% certainty) to do matching to find distant cousins by using current Genealogical DNA testing. So if you do not have your 4x-great-grandparents’ (all 64 of them) surnames then you are NOT guaranteed to be able to use current DNA tests to determine your relatedness to another genealogist (and his/her ancestors who must also have six generations in their tree too).

I am thinking we are still one or two generations (35-70 years) away from using this as a viable technique that will work with any two random genealogists — mathematically speaking. Obvious exceptions are Icelandiks or Amish or other relatively closed-genetic populations who may have greater success (or counter-intuitively lesser) with fewer generations. Its all in the DNA and in the quality of the testing to catch the diversity in your genome.

You will notice that the fine chart we have been using, including the one with the red-lines (my lines) that indicate autosomal DNA testing candidates, does NOT show enough generations. It would need to be extended one more generation. So we need the surnames of 64 people with whom we only share 1.5675% of our DNA with. That is with direct descent. If we are matching to the autosome DNA  (i.e. our Nth cousin, M-times removed) then we are matching to someone who we may only share 0.0243% blood with. That is 2/100th of 1 percent !

Related Blog Article

<

p style=”text-align:justify;”>Violinist’s Thumb24-January-2014 – This has many great links to other articles and includes some pertinent facts on DNA to think about. A Guaranteed thought provoker of a blog.

August 10, 2014

Meme: Things I Found While Looking Up Other Things — 02-JAN-1943, #History #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

19430102_ToledoBlade_Page10Dateline 02-JAN-1943Stanczyk was doing some newspaper research for my family tree residents that resided in Ohio, Lucas County, Toledo.  On 01-JANUARY-1943 Vincent Eliasz died.  From my visit to  Calvary Cemetery in Toledo and speaking with one of the caretakers (Bruce) who was very kind to me in search of my ancestors who were buried there that I wanted to pay my respects to. He opened the cemetery’s old books and showed me the info on my relatives; One of whom was Vincent Eliasz. So I knew that Vincent Eliasz died on Stomach Cancer on January 1st of 1943.

So I was searching Google’s History Newspaper Archive for the Toledo Blade in 1943. I did find Vincent’s death notice — it was helpful at documenting relationships and locales of siblings. But I could not help but notice something else. Of course, in January  1943 , we are 13 months into the USA’s involvement in World War II. So I was fascinated by the pictures and names of the local servicemen posted in the paper. The image at the top is the top half of page 10, Toledo Blade newspaper of  02-JAN-1943 (Saturday). Perhaps one of these men are related to you. Here is the rollcall of these men whose picture was in the newspaper that day:

B.W. Beaverson,   R.L. Cole,   Edward White,   C.J. Schultz,   R.G. Musser,

John h. Schaub Jr.,   Paul Beecher,   Roland Cordrey,   Danny Malecki,   A.F. Rutter,

Sam Maccabee,   R.L. Powell,   E.S. Gallon,   Robert Lewis,   C.C. Kirbey,

Herbert J. Hall, age 25 was just married and returning back to his aircraft carrier in Midway!

The Death Notices & Birth Notices were also on this page. Under the Births let me list two:

Mr & Mrs Clement Plenzler of 1019 Brookley had a boy on Friday [which would be 1/1/1943]

Mr & Mrs Robert Nadolny of 643 Junction had a girl on Friday.

 

* Click on the picture to go directly to the Google Newspaper Archive page *


 

 

August 8, 2014

King Richard III, died August 22, 1485, buried Saturday, March 28, 2015 — #Genealogy, #Royalty

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RichardIII

King Richard III was dead, you must admit for over 100 years or this story will make no sense. So more than a century had expired before the bard ever gave him the tragedy treatment.  King Richard III ‘s reputation was such a cesspool  of swirling accusations and counter claims that by Shakespeare’s time he is portrayed as “a physically deformed machiavellian villain, albeit courageous and witty …”. Now it is indeed true that king died in battle (final and decisive battle of the War of Roses) and was hastily buried and his remains were lost for just over a half-millenia.

Richard III was lost and spent the the first 500+ years of his eternal life, ignominiously buried beneath a parking lot in Leicester. They (the Brits) finally located where his bones were and the bones were unearthed in 2012 . Even though they had to ascertain whose bones were unearthed in that parking lot, this re-commenced a less violent and less heroic struggle for Richard III ‘s bones. After half a millenia in the ground we developed the ability look at DNA and via mtDNA and compared to those of a direct descendant of Richard’s sister. So now we have the remains of King Richard III for certain and as I foreshadowed the forces  of several armies immediately sought to lay claim to the bones. This mayhem precipitated a judicial review. The magistrates have ruled and now a proper party, er, um, ahem,  burial will be had and Richard III will be interred Saturday, March 28, 2015 at the Leicester Cathedral. There the king will lie in repose for three days prior to beginning the next part of his eternal life. King Richard III’s remains will lie in repose for three days, during which time the public can pay their respects. The first service, on March 26, will be followed by similar events on March 27 and 28 leaving plenty of time for people to plan their vacations to be a part of this august ceremony and  be able to purchase all of the bric-a-brac that is incumbent at major genealogical events !

Now we come to the heart of the matter for this jester. I  inveigle all of my Anglo-Genealogists and Royalists of all stripes to properly update their family trees to show the accurate burial date and place of poor Richard III. The king’s remains will now be deposited  inside a lead ossuary placed inside an English-oak coffin — all of which will be placed inside a brick-lined vault in the cathedral floor of  Leicester Cathedral. Let the Wikipedia editors take note too!

So let it be written.

#AccuracyInGenealogy

P.S.  —  As the picture shows, Shakespeare was at least correct in the physical deformity part of his portrayal.


August 8, 2014

George Timothy Clooney, Amal Ramzi Alamuddin — Marriage License — #Genealogy, #Celebrity

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Lgeorge-clooney-amal-marriage-licenseondoner Alamuddin is marrying George Clooney in Italy (It has been IntolerableCrueltyreported as in/near Venice). Didn’t I see this in a George Clooney movie before?

Ah, yes — in Intolerable Cruelty. Although this time miss Alamuddin is the lawyer and George is the divorcee.

Although if you are one of George’s cast-offs, this may be intolerable cruelty to you:

Sarah Larson, Krista Allen,  Lisa Snowdon,  Celine Belitran, Karen Duffy, Kelly Preston,  Talia Balsam [ex-wife].  [list is here, with photos]. George is the nephew of Rosemary Clooney.

 

This jester wishes the happy couple well and all the happiness the world has to offer !

 

Celebrity Genealogy.


 

July 30, 2014

Wordless Wednesday — Romanov Family — #Royal #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RomanovFamilyTreeThe Romanov Family Tree

There are quite a few distinct DNA combinations involved here …

German, English, Danish, Greek, as well as Russian (possibly some Polish too).

 

The lower right, is Prince Phillip Mountbatten [no picture], the husband of Queen Elizabeth II (the present Queen of England).

July 23, 2014

The Polish-American Man And His Service In World War I — #Genealogy, #Polish, #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has just come to realize that my Polish-American ancestors had such a love for their old country that they found many ways to serve.

 

Dateline 28-July-1914  —  The world went mad again. I am reminded of this century mark in 2014, just five days before the solemn memorial date. In the USA we call it World War I. Obviously there had been other multi-national conflicts dating back at least to the time of the American War For Independence. It is now a century since that fateful day that World War I started.  America maintained its neutrality, indeed it was in a period of isolationism. But the Old World does not leave the New World apart and isolated from the Old World. The USA  did not enter the war until April 6, 1917.  Wilson was unable to rustle the sleeping giant from its slumber and engage in this World War. Not until when a German U-boat sank the British liner Lusitania in 1915, with 128 Americans aboard did we begin to waken from our stupor and our anger rouse us to action. Still something kept us restive for  many months more.

 

A Century Later

So when Russian and/or Russian-Rebels in Ukraine,  shot down the Malaysian MH17 airplane  on 17 July 2014. Nearly a hundred years to the day! The parallel was not lost on Americans. Many pondered is this it? Are we going to start World War III? How horrific to even write those words, “World War III” — may it never be so. To see those thugs in Eastern Ukraine gleefully pick among the dead and steal their watches or credit cards and then ignore the dead???  Quelle horreur !  If there had been 128 Americans on MH17 like there were upon the Lusitania who knows what may have happened. Still 298 people died in an act of murder. The only thing more sickening to the commission of the murders is to watch  the loathsome Russian-speaking thugs in that part of the world try to propagandize the incident and frame innocent people for THEIR crime.

Dear Diary, I have to say that when I hear Russian-speaking thugs say the plane that they shot down was filled with dead people beforehand or that MH17 was the missing MH370 (which was lost over Indian Ocean) was also a further disgusting phlegm spewed  by these Russian-speaking thugs who had bragged upon the Russian-Facebook they shot down a Ukrainian cargo plane only to delete their Russian Tweet (on VK [originally VKontakte, Russian: ВКонтакте]) when they realized it was a Dutch filled Malaysian civilian airplane on its way to Kuala Lumpur and then summarily deleted their tweet little realizing it had been saved by media watchers. The EU slumbers while the Russian bear lumbers. Now it is not America who needs to be awakened.

 

The Pole-AM in World War I

A while ago I wrote about finding another ship manifest about returning Haller’s Army vets returning from World War I. This was a Canadian ship manifest. Like the Poles in America, the French-Speaking Canadians too wished to serve before Canada entered the war (for France). So a Canadian ship was bringing back some Haller’s Army vets with their own Canadian vets who served in France for the French.

It was a short time afterwards that this jester found a Canadian World War I Draft registration for a John Leszczynski  [name badly butchered multiple ways]. In fact, I would not have recognized it was one of my own had it not made a reference to a nearest relative living at 417 E. Webber St, Toledo, Ohio. That was an address of another of my great-grandfather’s grandsons. Later on I found a 1916 Toledo City Directory that said John Leszczynski lived at that same address too.

So in my family I had USA ancestors fighting in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1916, a few Haller’s Army Volunteers who served in France and one in Poland after 1918. I also had some American Army draftees too! So in fact, my family served in three different armies in World War I while being USA residents (soon to be citizens). They served in Canada and the USA and in France for Poland and then in Poland for Poland to fight in the Polish-Russian Border War  (1918-1921) settled by the Treaty of Riga. Three Armies, Four countries, Two Wars. My beloved ancestors, so loved their old country, Poland that they found ways to serve it in the war. They served before the USA entered the war, they served after the USA entered the war and they served after the USA left the World War to serve Poland in its fight against the Bolsheviks.

Those men loved Europe, enough to leave the safety of their American homes to return to the Old World and fight for their beloved old country (and/or their new country). I leave this history lesson for the EU to learn from. These men, those who lived, came home to the USA, became citizens and helped build this great nation.

Remember history;  So you recognize it when you’re repeating it!

 

 


July 18, 2014

Family Search – An Inventory of Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk,  frequently has written about the online inventories where the Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo parish records, scanned images or indexes  exist. I have written about Geneteka, GenBaza, etc. But did you know that Family Search also has some?

Buried within:

You can find the list of parishes at:  Family Search (Kielce) 

At present we find parishes have some online scans:

 


 

July 15, 2014

FamilySearch.org What’s New — #Genealogy, #Online, #Databases

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

WhatsNew_20140715Dateline 14-JULY-2014 — As the image shows …

There are six new databases available in FamilySearch.org, including Canadian and Peruvian data.

The 1920 and 1940 US Censuses alone are over 240 Million indexed records with images. Frequently the Family Search images are superior in quality to the Ancestry images. This has been true for other databases like the US World War I Draft Registrations whose quality was such that I could read the street addresses that previously in Ancestry had been unreadable. So if you have any 1920/1940 census images that were a bit sketchy to read, give these a try. You may also find the indexes differ from Ancestry indexes for the same images — so the moral of the story is to look at these as well in case a new indexing provides you access to record you previously were unable to find in Ancestry.

 

July 3, 2014

Kielce Parishes On-line in SzukajWArchiwach — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Previously, Stanczyk has written about what is available online for the former Gubernia (or Województwo) Kielce. In this article I am listing the SzukajWArchiwach.pl parishes online with year ranges and scan image counts. Please notice that links are provided for you to go directly to those you are interested in or you can go to the list of all parishes available (since as you know an article like this becomes out of date periodically).

 

Poland’s Archives (Kielce) Parish Year Range Scans #
21/1700/0 Brzegach 1810-1912  5,652
21/1701/0 Chomentowie 1810-1939  5,997
21/1702/0 Ciernie 1810-1907  5,717
21/1703/0 Imielnie 1810-1912  9,680
21/1704/0 Jędrzejowie 1812-1911  18,045
21/1705/0 Korytnicy 1810-1912  –
21/1706/0 Kozłowie 1811-1913  5,795
21/1707/0 Krzcięcicach 1810-1912  9,569
21/1708/0 Łukowej 1811-1909  4,732

Parishes (Parafia):  Brzegach,  Chomentowie,  Ciernie,  Imielnie,  Jędrzejowie,  Korytnicy,  Kozłowie,  Krzcięcicach,  Łukowej

Cut and Save— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

July 2, 2014

Death Certificates & Death Certificates — #Genealogy, #DeathCertificates

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk knows that genealogy is only as good as your sources. The less sourced your family tree, the less the quality of the research. Death is final! It is also well known that death documents are the least reliable as the informant is often incorrect or misinformed and that misinformation is transmitted to authorities. So newbie genealogists be forewarned.

Stanczyk has had a career (outside of being a jester) as a computer professional and more specifically, an expert in data (gathering, organizing, loading, managing and analyzing data). As a consultant, we have this little aphorism, “A man with a watch ALWAYS knows what time it is. And a man with two watches is never sure what time it is.”  What does this mean? It means data/info is often in conflict and that one or both of those watches is inaccurate. One watch at least, but maybe both are wrong if they disagree with each other.  Genealogy has this problem.

A few days ago, this jester was delighted to discover that Family Search provides a Photo Duplication Service for its databases that are index only — no images uploaded, just the transcribed index. What a boon that has been for me. I was finally able to locate a death certificate for a first-cousin-twice-removed (or my paternal grandfather’s first cousin if you prefer). I was thrilled, I now knew factually his father’s name and that the Polish Church record of his birth was for this individual in the USA that spelled his name like, ‘ELYASZ’. Polish/Slavic genealogists must deal with many factors in name corruption or name change. So I confirmed that this man in Detroit, was my grandfather’s cousin. I confirmed his death and his burial at Mt. Olivet in Detroit. I also confirmed that he was married and that his wife/widow was Lorraine Kraft Elyasz (the informant of the death certificate). But let me pause the story there.

A few years ago, when I visited Michigan, I went to the county seat of Macomb County, Michigan (Mt Clemens). So I made a research visit to the clerk of courts. My primary goal was to get death certificates for people in my life I had known, but lacked their death certificates: mother, grandmother, aunt were the primary goals — success. But I wanted my grand-uncle John (aka Jan) Eliasz who had the bad sense to die in 1936 instead of the modern post-World War II era. I did locate his death date and they had to mail me that death certificate because it was off-site due to its age. No online data for those death certificates (pre-1960). So here is what I received in the mail …

19360717_EliaszJohn_DeathCertExtract

Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

I knew the document was an extract. Just by the format of the death certificate. I was crest-fallen, extracted data is often error-prone and this was a death document the least reliable so that is a double-whammy! Later on, I found out that the age of my grand-uncle was wrong when I located his birth record from the church in Pacanow. So I knew that the age in years,months,days was just plain wrong.  Obviously, the spelling of the name was incorrect (Elias [sic] vs. Eliasz/Elijasz) and the ‘recording date’ led me to believe that this extraction was from a death return (similar to a marriage return)  which is again a further generation removed from a death certificate. Can you just imagine the error propagation rate?

So emboldened by my photo duplication success of Stanley Elyasz, I decided to order the photo duplication for John Elias too. I was hoping that maybe, just maybe they had the image of the actual death certificate. Do you know what I got back yesterday?

19360717_EliasJohn_ClintonTwp_DeathCert

Actual Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

 So, bless Family Search for producing a copy of the actual death certificate. Not much in conflict with the “extracted” form. But look at all of the extra info available:  Informant name/address, cemetery where buried, years in occupation, last year worked 1930 (6 years out of work during the Great Depression),  name of wife (Margaret ??? actually Pelagia), years lived in town of death (9 years => 1927 residence North Gratiot Ave, in Clinton Township), years in the USA (3o years => arrived 1906, I can only substantiate since 1910 which would be 26 years). Ok some of the extra information was also wrong, including birth date as I mentioned above.

So what did Stanley Elyasz’s death certificate look like  …

19231023_Detroit_ElyaszStanleyM_DeathCert

Stanley M. Elyasz

Interestingly enough both of these two gentlemen, who were first cousins also lived together in Detroit in 1921 at the 6410 Van Dyke Ave, Detroit, Wayne, MI [same as Stanley’s death certificate address]. I assume John moved from that address when his cousin died in 1923.

While sources may conflict isn’t it better to have them than not? Also, do not assume that there is only one Death Certificate. See above for my two death certificates for my grand-uncle John Elias [sic]. While they were not in conflict with each other, the second one was the much preferred one to have; I am glad I did not stop at the first one – in genealogy there are death certificates and then there are death certificates – they may not agree. Finally, bless my grand-aunt Mary Eliasz Gronek, but boy was she an error propagator. On my grand-father’s death certificate, she was NOT the informant (my grandmother was). But apparently after the fact, my grand-aunt submitted an affidavit and changed my grandfather’s birthdate. Unfortunately, she changed it from the correct date to a terribly wrong date. For years I had to keep three dates for my grandfather’s birth until I finally located his birth record in Pacanow. Then you learn what is truth and who are the good sources (or bad sources) of family information.

June 29, 2014

FamilySearch.org — Photoduplication Services — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RequestSubmitted

Did you know that you can submit a request to Family Search for Photo Duplication service of one of their indexed databases for a found indexed record?

Stanczyk did not know either. Then I read: “How to order an indexed document from Family Search” by Selma Blackmon .  At any rate, you can follow her steps to submit a request. I was able to utilize the info she wrote and submit a request (I am waiting for my emailed document, but I will update my readers when I get the result). Now you only get an email with an attachment of the image for the indexed record, which you request.

I’ll save you a few steps by putting the link below (so you do not have to search for it)

 

Requirements:

  1. You need an account [they are free].  Go to FamilySearc.org and click on “Join For Free” to register.
  2. After you have registered and you login to your new account, go to: https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services
  3. Lookup your indexed record. In Stanczyk’s case I chose the database: “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,”
  4. Notice that is only an index without any images. So I wanted to order the image of the death certificate I was interested in.
  5. I searched on “Elyasz” to get the info for Stanley M. Elyasz in order to submit the request
  6. I read the instruction from the above Photoduplication Services web page.
  7. I clicked on the green button, “Photoduplication Request Form”
  8. I filled in ALL fields with the info from the index result page of Stanley M. Elyasz and used that info
  9. Click on Submit

If you filled in ALL fields then you get the result I did in the picture at the top of this article. But you must fill in all fields or it will sit there as if it ignored your request — sadly no error message indicated I needed to fill in ALL fields.

The cost for an email of the document:  $0.00.  Most genealogists have an account to search the online images in the many databases that Family Search has published. But if not, then this Photoduplication Service should give you the impetus to register for an account.

PRICELESS! Thank you Family Search.org for providing this valuable service and Selma Blackmon for writing about it.


 

Returned Image [1-JULY-2014] from Submitted Request:

19231023_Detroit_ElyaszStanleyM_DeathCert

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