Dimunitive Dionizy — #Polish #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Yesterday, Stanczyk wrote about Polish Name Days. The article got a bit longish. So  I left out an example, but I wanted to write briefly about names some more. So here is my diminutive example.

Dionizy – Whose derivation undoubtedly comes from the Greek Name: Dionysus. When I found Dionizy’s birth record (29-MARCH-1852 in Strozyska, Swietokrzyskie [old Kielce Gubernia], Poland, in Strozyska parish, 1852 Births, Akt #28) it was written as DYONIZY Stanislaw.

Using link #4 from yesterday (http://diminutive-names.com/) we see:

Dionizy
Danek, Dioncio, Dionek, Dionizulcio, Dionizulek, Dionizuszek, Dionizuś, Dionuś, Dyziek, Dyzio, Dyziu

Dionizy Stanislaw Slawinski.  Now Stanislaw, the middle name in America that acquired the diminutive form of STOSH. Stosh seemed to  acquire Kleenix or Xerox status in that it was used as a way to refer to any Polish male (whether or not his name was actually  Stanislaw/Stanislaus/Stanley or not). I noticed Stosh is not listed as a diminutive.

Let this jester do one more name near and dear to his heart. ELIASZ is the Polish name derived from the Hebrew Prophet Elijah in the Old Testament of the Bible. This name is used as a first name and a last name. It is also a Christian name and a Jewish name (and certainly used in the Muslim world too). So much confusion occurs tracing the ELIASZ surname.  Here are the diminutive forms:

Eliasz

Eja, Elek, Eli, Eliasio, Eliaszek, Elijah, Eliotto, Elis, Eliś, Eljot, Elliot, Elsio, Eluniek, Eluś, Laszek

Let me finish with a final thought on Polish names. Many Polish surnames wind up getting ‘Americanized’. What I mean by that  can be best demonstrated by my own research examples.

I have ELIASZ (in St. Louis MO, related to WWI War Hero) change to ELLIS [currently not connected to this jester]. More directly, in my family is the use of the Name Change. Our own surname was changed to ELIASZ-SOLOMON (thus insuring confusion for future genealogists). Still very ethnic. How about Sobieszczanski becoming Sobb? We also see Leszczynski become Lester and Laskey or Lescinski. This last-name evolution needs someone to write long-read blog article upon. We should also build a dictionary of Polish Name Evolution in America. This would require the help of MANY genealogists to get a large enough coverage to be a useful tool. Otherwise this will be a problem akin to that of women who marry and take their husband’s name. A genealogic lost trail that requires a critical document to pick up the trail again.

Something to Muse upon.


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2 Comments to “Dimunitive Dionizy — #Polish #Genealogy”

  1. Nice article, Mike! The diminutive for Stanisław is spelled Staś in Polish, rather than Stosh, but interestingly, I see that it’s still not listed as a diminutive for Stanisław at that site. Maybe it’s a diminutive more commonly used in American Polonia than in Poland?

    Liked by 1 person

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