Archive for September, 2011

September 7, 2011

#Polish #Genealogy #Maps – Just Another Manic Map Day

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Kielce - Radom (Stopnica pow. - Sandomierz pow.)

Stanczyk has a new meme: “Just Another Manic Map Day”.

The map with this article is a cross section of the old Kielce province (aka Wojewwodztwo, Gubernia). I was looking at this because of an email I received from Jonathan B. His ancestors are from Kloda with perhaps a tie to my village of Pacanow. Hence this map shows both. [Click on image to see full image]

I noticed that Jonathan’s village was JUST across the Kielce border into Radom gubernia. At one time these were both in the original Sandomierz gubernia from which the Kielce and Radom gubernias were formed from. That caused my mind to think about other resources I have stumbled across on the Internet. So let me take today to introduce a useful link for Polish researchers of Kielce / Radom gubernias (wojewwodztwo).

This is a part of the JewishGen.org website. They have copies of a Journal (which I have seen in libraries) named appropriately: Kielce-Radom Journal. The journal has now been defunct for a few years — so this Special Interrest Group (SIG) is no more, but its journals can be read online (in PDF format). Click on the link to see the list of journals.

That is my tip. Go look at their back issues. There are many useful methodology articles. It is mostly a Jewish centric journal, but the methodology applies to all genealogists who have ancestors from Kielce-Radom areas.

 

P.S.

I thought I would add a post script. In order to place this map visually, you need to know that Krakow is further south-west along the Vistula river [at the bottom]. Just off the north edge is the town of Staszow. Off the bottom edge, across the Vistula river is Szczucin [follow the road from Pacanow south across the bridge].

September 6, 2011

#Jewish #Genealogy – A Continuing Homage to Moja żona – Biechow 1819

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

I am continuing my efforts to retrieve/extract the Jewish records from the Catholic parish of Biechow during the years when the Catholic Church was ordered to act the civil registration authority.  My previous postings were for the years 1810-1818. inclusive.

These are the Jewish Births from 1819 recorded in Biechow parish. Ergo, this posting brings us upto: 1810-1819 inclusive. The prior post is here .

Before I begin, I have been watching the evolution of names in the church register and I thought I would offer a few observations. First off, I am a gentile genealogist. So my treatment of Jewish names as rendered in the Polish language with its complex grammar is suspect — but I am learning.

So earlier I have been struggling with the surname: Golbarka or Goberka (also rendered as Golbarkow). First off, the assumption of ‘bark’ vs ‘berk’ due to poor writing and page condition is definitely off. I now know the name is Golberg (or we would probably render in 20th century English as Goldberg/Goldburg). I think I will keep the Golberkow ending as this is the grammatical construct for referring to the family as when writing the woman’s maiden name.

Notice I have decided to drop the ending ‘a’ on men’s names — which I am also thinking I should do on many first names as well, but my lack of experience with Jewish names of the 19th century Poland causes me to wonder how to apply what William Hoffman calls, ‘The Chopping Block’ to both first and last names when Jewish. So forgive me when I write: Moska, Mendla and Herszla(which in 20th century America I’d write as Herschel as in Herschel Walker). I know I need to drop the ending ‘a’, but I am not certain as to how to write those names, so I leave them as I find them for someone more expert than I to correct. My apologies in advance.

We see three births out of 104 total births. That represents a population of about 2.88% of the total parish population. So we are in the range of 3% +/- 0.25% which seems to be what I have seen in previous years. Again realize I am trying to give an in idea of the Jewish population in proportion to the entire population of the parish in (not intimating that the Jewish peoples are participants in the church parish activities). The 3% represents a modest growth from the 2.6% in Biechow census from 1787. [See Parish Census at the top of this blog]. According to that same census, the entire set of parishes in the surrounding area was about 6.4% Jewish.

My reason for doing this assessment is to convince the JRI, that it should at some point visit all Catholic parishes to pull out the remaining Jewish people without looking at the amount of effort required to yeild such tiny results. We know they are there  — do not leave them behind. After my Social Network Analysis, I am thinking that these non-shtetl Jews are a kind of glue between the surrounding towns/shtetls.

The assessment also shows that Jews and Catholics lived side by side and not segregated [in this very rural area very near to the Austria-Poland partition]. Now this may only be true in Poland and not the rest of “The Pale of Settlement” as defined by the Czars of the Russian Empire. According to Wikipedia,  Jews (of the Pale) were not forbidden by the Czars from rural areas until 1882.

Year: 1819      Priest: Jozef Parzelski         Gmina: Biechow     Powiat: Stopnica     Departement: Krakow      104 Total Births     LDS Microfilm#: 936660

Record #38     Date: 4/17/1819 [about 1 month earlier than the 5/15/1819 record date]

Father: Mosiek Golberg,  Arendarz, Age 34, Wojcza   House #60

Mother: Fraydla z Jakow, age 32

Baby: girl Cyra

Witnesses:  Moska Samulowicz, kaczmarz, age 36 Biechow & Mendla Abramowicz, pakiarz,  <no age>, Wojcza

—-

Record #53     Date: 7/7/1819

Father: Nat Belel,  Mlynarz, Age 25, Wojcza   House #3 (listed as Jozef Pawelec ‘s house)

Mother: Rucha  z Golberkow, age 22

Baby: girl Eydla

Witnesses:  Mendla Abramowicz, pakiarz,  28, Wojcza   &  Moska Szmulowicz, pakiarz, <no age> Wola Biechowska

—-

Record #104     Date: 12/23/1819

Father: Jasek Wolf,  pakiarz, Age 45, Biechow   House #48

Mother: Blima  z Chaymowicz, age 38

Baby: boy Herszla

Witnesses:  Zalman Stemberk(Stemberg??), pakiarz,  28, Biechow   &  Berka Chaymowicz, Handlarz, <no age>  Biechow

–Stanczyk

September 6, 2011

#Genealogy #Website #Rankings – 2011

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk just read EOGN (Eastman Online Genealogy Network) and could not believe what he read. So I followed the source and read that and still did not believe. So I checked further – because I could NOT locate the benchmark/methodology of the survey which is NOT credible. I  then Googled and found this source here:  http://www.progenealogists.com/top50genealogy2011.htm .  I certainly would agree with these rankings as these are what I use most often throughout the year.

Perhaps I am not Canadian as the source EOGN quoted was and perhaps the methodology was geographic based (in Canada, with UK add-in). Dick Eastman should do some extra checking rather than just re-broadcasting bogus news. That is my expectation for EOGN. Read the EOGN blog post that  I am railing against here: http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2011/09/genealogy-site-rankings.html

Certainly if I surveyed Polish Genealogy websites, my list would look differently too.

Here is the only credible 2011 Rankings:

Rank    Website                     Coverage/Content

  1. Ancestry.com $ – Ancestry.com is the leading genealogical data site, and includes articles, instruction, and reference help.
  2. MyHeritage.com - Focuses on genealogy community building and networking.
  3. FindAGrave.com - This database of 57 million cemetery inscriptions adds about a million per month and often includes tombstone photos.
  4. FamilySearch.org - This major data website sponsored by the LDS Church includes the IGI, census records, the library’s catalog and a growing collection of historical records from throughout the world, along with instruction and reference help. (4>5>5)
  5. Genealogy.com $ – A major data site, includes family trees, instruction and reference help. (5>2>4)
  6. Geni.com – Free, with the world’s largest collaborative family. (31>8>18)
  7. MyFamily.com - Hosts family websites for sharing photos, genealogy, and more. (33>5>5)
  8. FamilyLink.com $ - One of the most popular FaceBook applications helps people identify and network with their family and search billions of records. (2>80>72)
  9. RootsWeb.com – One of the largest, free, user-contributed data sites, includes 575 million names in family trees, also instruction and reference help. (6>4>2)
  10. AncestorHunt.com – Free genealogy search engine linking to free data. (11>11>12)
  11. AccessGenealogy.com – Millions of names in 250,000 pages, along with links to free data; especially useful for Native American information, and some data. (13>14>13)
  12. SearchForAncestors.com - Interactive directory of free genealogy websites and data. (12>19>21)
  13. GenealogyBank.com $ – 1 billion exclusive records from 4500 newspapers and historical books. (19>31>41)
  14. USGWArchives.net – A large collection of free data, arranged by state and searchable across the entire collection. (8>not ranked)
  15. CyndisList.com – The best subject catalog of genealogy webpage links. (14>17>15)
  16. Interment.net - Transcribed and indexed cemetery inscriptions. (16>16>16)
  17. OneGreatFamily.com$ – A family tree sharing and collaboration website. (9>11>9)
  18. GenealogyToday.com - Includes instruction, reference articles, and some unique data collections. (10>12>11)
  19. SurnameWeb.org – A collection of surname website links; online since 1996. (48>62>26)
  20. FindMyPast.co.uk$ – (Back in) 650 million British records of many types [formerly FindMyPast.com]. (57>46>50)
  21. Geneanet.org - (Back in) A European collection of 400 million names in family trees, community, and submitted records. (58>42>36)
  22. DeathIndexes.com - Lists of links to United States death records, by state. (23>25>31)
  23. Linkpendium.com – Nine million genealogy links organized by state/county and surname. (24>24>35)
  24. EllisIsland.org - Database of 24 million New York passenger arrivals that is free to search. Actual passenger list images can be printed or purchased. (15>20>14)
  25. GeneBase.com - A DNA ancestry cataloguing project with 675,000 users. (21>24>24)
  26. GenealogyTrails.com - Five year old site with free U.S. data contributed by volunteers. (25>35>NR)
  27. GenealogyBuff.com – A free genealogy search site with hundreds of data sources. (27>134>NR)
  28. FamilyTreeMaker.com - Homepage for Ancestry.com’s genealogical software. (28>21>20)
  29. USGennet.org - Historical and genealogical web hosting service. (18>15>17)
  30. WorldVitalRecords.com $ – The data collection provided by Family Link, with over a billion records, as well as instruction and reference help. (17>13>10)
  31. FamilyTreeDNA.com - DNA testing service focused upon family history test types. (20>26>27)
  32. Footnote.com $ – In conjunction with the U.S. National Archives, Footnote offers data, original records images, and more. (37>9>8)
  33. KindredKonnections.com $ – Grassroots created data site with compiled family trees, and some extracted records. (29>22>19)
  34. CensusFinder.com - Links to free census records. (22>29>40)
  35. Archives.com $ – A major new subscription data site, launched in July 2009 and already with more than a billion names. (41>New)
  36. DistantCousin.com - An online archive of genealogy records and images of historical documents. (34>23>22)
  37. FamilyHistory101.com - Less than four years old and full of instruction and guidance for genealogists. (38>47>107)
  38. ThePeerage.com – A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe. (44>53>58)
  39. TribalPages.com - Family trees hosting with 300,000 members and 80 million names. (35>28>25)
  40. RootsChat.com – (New) Free family history messaging forum with almost 3 million mostly UK messages. (57>54>NR)
  41. HeritageQuestOnline.com $ – Census, PERSI (the periodical index), books, all free to you at many libraries. (32>39>39)
  42. NewspaperObituaries.net – (New) A directory of obituary databases and archives on the web. (91>84>126)
  43. AncientFaces.com - Share genealogy research, community pages, family photos & records more for free. (46>48>38)
  44. JewishGen.org - Jewish, reference, instruction, coordination, and databases. (26>32>28)
  45. PoliticalGraveyard.com - Comprehensive source of U.S. political biography that tells where many dead politicians are buried. (36>33>34)
  46. CousinConnect.com - A large free queries website. (39>27>23)
  47. DAR.org - Site of the largest lineage society; includes their library catalog and 32 million name index. (43>49>67)
  48. FamilyTreeMagazine.com – (New) Website for popular magazine that includes shopping, links, and research tools. (55>67>47)
  49. AmericanAncestors.org $ – (New) The new name for the NEHGS website and their 3,000 databases.  (73>89>87)
  50. GenealogyLinks.net – 50,000 links to free sites, arranged by state and county. (53>50>43)

Dropping out of the top 50:

  • GenWed.com- Online marriage records, where to order, some indexes, and more. (42>43>42)
  • ObitLinksPage.com- State-by-state directory of obituaries and obituary resources. (47>not ranked)
  • Genuki.org.uk- Large collection of genealogical information pages for England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man. (50>34>32)
  • GenoPro.com- Genealogy software that produces genograms (40>37>53)
  • US-Census.org- Census abstracts (U.S. GenWeb Census Project) (49>45>37)
  • Genealogy.org– (New) A listing of 400+ registered websites, ranked weekly by hits. (45>69>56)
  • FamilyTiez.com– (New) A site where families can establish their own pages to share news, photos, events and genealogy with each other. (30>not ranked)

Send Me your  top 10 Polish Genealogy Websites. This will be a non-scientific survey and I will only publish my findings if I can get 36 emails and I will add in my own top 10 Polish Genealogy sites too. Do not include from the above “generic” genealogy sites. I will allow only Polish (or German, Russian, Austrian, Slavic, Czech, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, Jewish, or Hungarian genealogy websites that have ties to Poland).

Email your top 10 to: Stanczyk Email

September 4, 2011

#Genealogy – Without the Sermon: Introducing “The Catholic Gene”

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

A new take on Genealogy and a very polished blog to boot.  Welcome to “The Catholic Gene“. Just look at these bloggers …

Jasia (Creative Gene), Donna Pointkouski who also writes What’s Past is Prologue, Stephen Danko, Sheri Fenley, Lisa (Smallest Leaf), Lisa A. Alzo, Denise Levenick, Craig Manson, and Ceil Jensen.  That’s not a blog, that’s a full blown Polish Genealogy Conference!

I had seen mention of it via my rootsweb genealogy mailing lists, then I saw it pop up on my iGoogle Genealogy Page.  I had to check it out after reading Creative Gene (see my blog roll — in fact most of these people are on it). Naturally, Stanczyk‘s curiosity  was piqued by the blog roll entry, “The Curt Jester”  — clever.

Make this a part of your Sunday ritual, its good for the soul and should be good for your genealogy too.

September 4, 2011

College Football Is Back !!!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Tuff Wolverine

Tuff Wolverine

Well a little diversion from my more erudite pursuits…

Somehow Stanczyk feels a case of Football Interruptus. What a crazy week!  Baylor knocks off TCU — good for the Bears. Utah St vs Auburn provided late hysterics to make for an interesting game. UM and ND interrupted by Climate Change. A Win for Big Blue and the Blues for the Irish. But next week the College World arrives in Ann Arbor. What ? “College Game Day” comes to Ann Arbor for the Throwback Jersey Game – “UNDER THE LIGHTS” of:   MICHIGAN vs NOTRE DAME .

LSU is able to set aside the distractions and in the biggest game of the week, stuffs Oregon in Arlington, TX in a first week Top-5 match-up where the lower rated team wins! Gotta love that Les Miles (LSU Coach).  Georgia and UCLA fizzle — pity Stanczyk likes Richt & Neuheisel . Minnesota played well against USC. All-in-all, I think the Pac-12 looked bad. The Big10 (uh 12) looked pretty good (IND excepted) — Welcome Big RED (Nebraska in the BIG10 AWESOME).

September 3, 2011

Post Office Department – Stanczyk’s Mailbag

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

From the Post Office Department

From my Mail Bag

 

FROM:   MaryAnne
MaryAnne asked about “readability” of the blog,

REPLY:

The format of the blog/website is due to wordpress (my blogging software and website provider). Their programs/widgets dictate the “style” which I have very little control over. I will try and write using a bigger “format” (ex. Heading 4 instead of paragraph). I cannot write in all bold as that will actually make things harder to read for more people.

But I suspect the problem is really your browser. Fortunately, most browsers now allow a “zoom” feature. I can give you help with either Internet Explorer or Firefox(Mozilla) browsers.

In Internet Explorer (popular in Windows computers), you would hit ‘Alt-X’. That is press and hold the ‘Alt’ key next to spacebar, and while still holding down the ‘Alt’ key press ‘x’. Hence Alt-x. This will bring up a “contextual” menu near the top of your browser window. “Zoom” is the third choice. It will bring up a list of zoom-levels. I recommend 125% or 150% for you. That should improve the readability for you.

In Firefox, you press “Ctrl-Shift-+” to zoom in and “Ctrl–” That is Control-plus to zoom in and Control-minus to zoom out. As with the “Alt” key, the “Ctrl” key must be pressed and held down while you type the other key(s).

Let me know if you use another browser. I do have Safari for Windows (sadly Stanczyk is making do with a Windows computer instead of his beloved MAC).

If the “zoom” feature improves your ability to read my blog, then I will not make any changes. You may also want to have someone to adjust the contrast/color on your monitor for you too. I know I had to really tinker with these Windows computers to get the colors to give me the proper contrast. This was something I took for granted in the MAC world.

Stanczyk too has “very aged” eyes from years of working on computers. Thanks MaryAnne!

 

—————————-

FROM: Jonathan

Jonathan asked about Pacanów and Kłoda, his Pytko family,  and how hard it is to read “Old Russian”.

REPLY:

Jonathan, thanks for writing. As for emails – you can send me A church record and I will be happy to read it for you and send you a translation of the “Old Russian” (pre-1918 reforms). You can write to me at: Stanczyk@eliasz.com . OK?  Any pictures you send me via email may or may not be used in the blog as part of the answer [fair use].

As for Pacanów, the LDS have four microfilm of the Pacanów(Busko-Zdroj) in Kielce(old woj.). There are a few Kłoda villages. Is yours the one near Radom? That Kłoda has parish of Magnuszew (no microfilm for this parish). Here are the four microfilm (1875-1884) for Pacanów(Busko-Zdroj):

Akta urodzeń, małżeństw, zgonów 1875 – FHL INTL Film [ 1192351 Item 10 ]
Akta urodzeń, małżeństw, zgonów 1876-1877 – FHL INTL Film [ 1192352 Items 1-2 ]
Akta urodzeń, małżeństw, zgonów 1878-1881 – FHL INTL Film [ 1807621 Items 8-11 ]
Akta urodzeń, małżeństw, zgonów 1882-1884 – FHL INTL Film [ 1807622 Items 1-3 ]

Akta urodzeń, małżeństw, zgonów = Birth, Marriage, Death records.

I have seen Pytko/Pytka in Pacanów and Świniary parishes.

–Stanczyk

September 2, 2011

#Jewish #Genealogy – A Continuing Homage to Moja żona – Biechow 1818

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

I am continuing my efforts to retrieve/extract the Jewish records from the Catholic parish of Biechow during the years when the Catholic Church was ordered to act the civil registration authority.  My previous postings were for the years 1810-1817. inclusive.

These are the Jewish Births from 1818 in Biechow parish. Ergo, this posting brings us upto: 1810-1818 inclusive. The prior post is here .

Year: 1818      Priest: Jozef Parzelski         Gmina: Biechow     Powiat: Stopnica     Departement: Krakow      85 Total Births

Record #3     Date: 1/1/1818

Father: Mosiek Merzdal, Handlarz, Age 28, Wojcza   House #50

Mother: Sorli z Lewkow, age 24

Baby: boy Herczyk

Witnesses:  Jaska Jaskowicz, pakiarz, age 42 Wojcza & Moska Szymolewicz, kaczmarz,  <no age>, Biechow

—-

Record #12     Date: 2/1/1818

Father: Jasek Jaskowicz, Pakiarz, Age 42, Wojcza   House #2

Mother: Estera z Nutow, age 36

Baby: girl Ruskla

Witnesses:  Moska Golbarka, Arendarz, age 34 Wojcza & Moska Szymolewicz, szynkarz,  <no age>, Biechow

—-

Record #15     Date: 2/14/1818

Father: Mosiek Szymolewicz, Szynkasz, Age 36, Biechow   Biechow Inn #77

Mother: Setla z Slorkow, age 36

Baby: girl Esterka

Witnesses:  Moska Golbarka, arendarz, age 34 Wojcza & Simela Komnan, kaczmarzek,  56, Jastrzebica (parish Stopnica)

So we have 3 births in 1818 out of 84 total births, which is 3.6% of birth population. Also note that Mosiek Szymolewicz was in all three records with no age given in the first two records where he was a witness, finally we get his age as the father in the third birth record. Also note the visiting witness from Jastrzebica village which is identified as being in the Stopnica parish.

As usual, I give the JRI permission to use these Jewish records in their databases [if they ever get around to visiting my blog].

I can quickly pick out the Jewish records out  as they hand-write their names in Hebrew script. It is possible that my using this method may cause me to miss a Jewish record if the record was not signed with Hebrew [although let me hasten to add that very few records are signed, maybe another 4-5 beyond the Hebrew signatures and most of those other signatures I recognize as Catholic families that I have in my family tree.]

September 2, 2011

#Polish #Genealogy #Blog – Stanczyk Thanks His Visitors …

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Visitors Last 60 Days - Cumulative

About two months ago, on the 4th of July, Stanczyk decided to put a counter on the blog/website to see who you, my gentle readers are. Thank you for coming and for your emails — please keep them coming.

Since the blog is written in English, with a smattering of Polish, or Russian or even Latin, I suspected the English speaking world (US, CA, GB, AU) would be the majority. As you can see by the flags of the world and the numbers besides the flags,  representing yourselves, that is true.

Since much of the subject matter is Polish/Slavic genealogy based, then I was not surprised to find Poland my second largest country of interested viewers — Dziękuję bardzo . Indeed my thanks to all of the Central/Eastern Europeans from: PL, DE, RU, CZ, AT, UA, BY, LT and even HR — you know who you are.

I am pleased with Canada since many Polish genealogists or genealogists in general  who trace the Polonian diaspora came through Canada, as was the case in some of Stanczyk’s family tree. I am pleasantly surprised by the Nordic nations (SE, NO, DK), but of course there was much intermingling with the Polish peoples in a time long ago, including Mieszko I ‘s grandson Canute (aka Cnut the Great) who went on to great influence in the Nordic countries and finally in the United Kingdom itself.

As for the rest of the world, I am glad you came too. I thank you for your polite inquisitiveness.

I would urge all interested parties who blog, to use the Flag Counter — why not? I think the experiment was a success. I now know I am reaching my target audience (and a bit more besides) globally.

You can find the flag on the Map pages or the Dziennik Polski (Detroit, MI) pages. Click on the flags and it will take you the Flags Counter website where you can get your own.

Thanks for being a part of my experiment. For my part, I think I will keep it going to see how many Flags of the world I can collect or how many US states (32 so far) or Canadian provinces (5) I can wrangle in.

 

Your Host,

–Stanczyk

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