Genealogy Indexer – Historical Polish City Directories

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Yesterday, Stanczyk was extoling the virtues of the Genealogy Indexer web site. This site has OCR’ed Historical City Directories from Poland’s Digital Libraries and built a database of names from this OCR work.

I also recommended Americans not use diacriticals (accents) unless you can use them correctly as incorrect use will cause you to miss records. Using correct diacriticals or none gives the same results, so mis-used diacriticals is the only way you can miss data. So do NOT use diacriticals.

The image above shows the query screen, where Stanczyk queried on ‘pacanów, eljasz‘, using the keyboard symbol next to the query field to enter diacriticals (I know some of you will want to do this despite my admonitions otherwise). This is actually a handy tool for entering Cyrillic or other Slavic characters on our USA keyboards. Just cut/paste from this website to another website or form or document. At any rate, my query returned five results (only three shown above). I chose the second one to illustrate in this article. The links will take you to a digital image of the document (using Deja Vu browser plug-in) that matches your query result. How cool is that?

So I selected the second link (1930 above).

The resulting digital image was a City Directory Phone book. The language is Polish, but there is a second language (French) too! So if the image is unreadable in one language perhaps you can read the other and figure out what was unreadable in the other. It is also helpful in translating  too, to have two languages.  The first part is a description of the place-name (like a Gazetteer) written in both Polish and French.

The top two paragraphs are Polish, then French Gazetteer description of the place-name (Pacanow). We can see that 1930 Pacanow had 2598 residents an interesting fact to know. After these first two paragraphs we see, what we would call “Yellow Page” listings by business type. It starts with Doctor(s) (Lekarze) and then from there on it flows alphabetically (in Polish) with Midwife, Pharmacy, etc. Each business type is followed by one or more names. These names are your putable ancestors.

I was interested in Kolowdzieje (Wheelwright) business Eljasz M. [This is possibly my grandfather’s uncle Marcin Eliasz]. Also the Wiatraki (Wind Mills) business was VERY interesting because we find both Eljasz and Zasucha names. Now this makes Stanczyk’s day as my 2nd great grandfather   was Martin (aka Marcin) Elijasz and he married an Anna Zasucha. These Wind Mill owners are very likely close ancestors of Stanczyk.

There are many surnames from my family tree besides Eljasz and Zasucha, we find:  Poniewierski, Pytko, Siwiec, Wlecial, and Wojtys. Now I can put an occupation by my ancestors. Nice. Very Nice!

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2 Comments to “Genealogy Indexer – Historical Polish City Directories”

  1. Greetings! I am writing the story of a holocaust survivor, Joe Rubinstein, who worked for a lumberyard that made wagon wheels in Radom, Poland prior to the war. I think it possible that this is the same as your reference to Kolowdzieje (Wheelwright) who you said may be your grandfather’s uncle Marcin Eliasz]. Joe said this was a Jewish owner who was reportedly the “wealthiest” man in Radom. He drove a black Opel and treated my Joe like family. Have you learned any more about this lumberyard owner? Joe thinks the family may have left Poland before the war…possibly to England, but he isn’t certain about this. Does any of this sound familiar to what you’ve learned?

    Like

    • Hi Nancy! Thank you for reading and writing to the blog.

      I think we do not have a match. My Eliasz family are Catholic. I like your story and wish I could claim Marcin as one of mine. I have two Marcin Eliasz (my 2x great-grandfather) and his son Marcin and they are both from Pacanow [admittedly not very far from Radom]. Still I will keep your comment/email in case I learn different.

      Like

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