Posts tagged ‘Zabiec’

November 19, 2014

FOUND: Another Genealogist Reconnected to their Ancestral Parish: Pacanów

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

JanMazur_Record214

214 | Mazur | Jan | Żabiec

Stanczyk was in Ancestry.com ‘s forums when I read:

My great grandfather, Jan Mazur (b. 22 Oct 1894) left Żabiec for Hamburg where he boarded the ship Amerika in 1911 and then landed in NYC some time the following year. He married my great grandmother in 1916. He was said to either own or manage a bar in Massachusetts. He died on 27 May 1938, two years after naturalizing.

I have not been able to find any information about his life in Poland. I was told that his mother’s name was Agneiszka (b. ~1870) but his father’s name remains a mystery. Some relatives believe she may not have been married or was widowed shortly after Jan’s birth. We believe he had at least one brother (possibly named Michael) but we have no idea if he stayed in Żabiec or if he also left at some point. Also, it’s been passed down that Agneiszka was at some point involved with a man named Wojciech Zytr. I would love to know if she found happiness with him and if there were any children. Sadly, my grandfather and his older brother have passed away and so any knowledge they had is now lost.

However, I’ve refused to give up hope that I will one day find out if my great grandfather was from Żabiec and if he had family that he left behind. I would love to find out where Jan got his last name from and I want to know what happened to Agneiszka as well.

So, my purpose for posting this message here: Has anyone ever come across information about Mazurs in Żabiec? Or does anyone have a suggestion for where I could potentially find information about my ancestors? I would be so grateful for any response.

So I went to GenBaza in order to aid her. In record 214 (upper left on image), Her great-grandfather Jan Mazur was born in Żabiec. √-Check on Żabiec being the birthplace. The birthdate is 22-November-1894. So the birthday is a very close match, the day and year match and the month is one month later than remembered (November instead of October).

His (Jan the baby whose birth is documented in the picture above) father was Wojciech Mazur, age 30 and his mother was Agnieszka Żyła age 20 (=> a birth of about 1864).  √-Check on mom’s name fitting her family tale, including the approximate birth year.

The witnesses were: Jozef Duponka, age 46 and Wojciech Gurniak age 36.

The God Parents were: Jozef Duponka & Marianna Gurniak.

As for the mystery man named Wojciech Zytr. I propose that the man was Wojciech Mazur (the father). and that Zytr is a corruption/combination of Mazur and Zyla. Especially when you consider that the slashed-l looks a lot like a ‘t’ .

What does “Mazur, Jan”,  look like in Cyrillic (Russian):

MazurJan_InRussianCyrillic


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January 13, 2012

Pacanow Marriage Statistics 1878-1884 – #Polish, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is obsessed with learning and understanding his ancestral villages. To that end, I spent the latter part of December analyzing the marriage records of Pacanów parish. As regular readers may know, Pacanów was in the Russian-Poland partition in the old gubernia (wojewodztwo/woj.) of Kielce which is north-east of today’s Krakow, Poland.  Pacanów  is now in the woj. of Swieto Krzyskie.

Today I have a graphic of a spreadsheet of the data I collected. Besides providing some demographics by the villages that made up the parish of Pacanów, it also gives you an inkling of the villages that comprise the parish [it may not be an exhaustive list]. You should also be aware that Catholic parish boundaries changed over time, just as they do today. So parish and dioceses may be different from earlier periods and also from those of the present time.

This was also an excellent exercise in practicing reading, transliterating, and translating Russian/Cyrillic to the Latin-based Polish alphabet. As always, the handwriting of the priest , the quality of the paper/book/ink  and even the original scanning of the church records affects your paleographic efforts. So scanning church records for a limited set of proper nouns can improve your paleographic/translating skills. After all, I know the noun has to be a village on the map (some map from that time period) so even difficult paleographic challenges can usually be resolved.

Results of Marriage Statistics

1878-1884 Pacanow Parish Marriage Stats By Village

For indexing/scanning purposes the villages are:

Karsy Duzy, Karsy Maly, Kepa Lubawska, Komorow, Kwasow, Niegoslawcie, Pacanow, Rataje, Slupia, Sroczkow, Szczeglin, Zabiec

I did not include Folwark Dolne as that is a manor house/ estate, (more so than an actual village).

July 7, 2011

Ancestral Villages – Poland, Kielce (old woj.), Stopnica (pow.)

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stopnica Pas 47 Slup 32 Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny 1938 (scale 1:100,000)

This picture is a map of the villages that Stanczyk’s ancestors were from. The river in the South-East corner of the map is the Wisla / Vistula river. To the South-central area are a few more villages that could not be shown: Oblekon and also Szczucin (across the Vistula). North of the Vistula, was the Russian-Poland partition. South of the Vistula was the Austrian-Poland partition. These partitions arose from Austria (aka Austrian-Hungarian Empire), Prussia, and Russia colluding in 1772, 1792, and finally in 1794 to divvy up the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth until Poland had vanished from the map of Europe for about 125 years, until it reappeared in 1918. Between 1797 and 1815 various ex-expatriate Polish legions fought along side Napoleon, so the final boundaries of the three partitions continued to evolve until 1815 when Napoleon was finally defeated for good. It is ironic to me that this region on the map above changed hands so many times and that I had ancestors in two kingdoms who would marry across parishes (and indeed national boundaries).

So it was not really surprising to me that my Busia (grandmother) spoke: Polish, Russian and German and most Catholics prior to Vatican II did know a smattering of Latin since church masses were often in Latin. Indeed, my father related to me that my grandmother was fluent enough to make money during the Great Depression by translating letters to/from English to/from  Polish/Russian/German for Americans to be able to carry on correspondences in the old country.

Stanczyk remembers my grandmother speaking to me as a child in perfect English (with the lovely/charming Central European accent). I also vividly remember that after her stroke, she could only speak Polish (her native language). I would converse with my dad acting as translator between us in her kitchen over percolated coffee (ye gads — has it been nearly a half century of coffee drinking for me) from when I was about five or six years old.  My dad laughingly relates how when he was a boy, my grandmother would chastise him that his Polish was no good and that he should speak to her in English. Obviously his Polish was good enough that years later,  the three of us could chit-chat over coffee quite comfortably.

Stanczyk’s remembrances have caused me to digress. The point of this map was to list the villages where I have found vital records / church records for my Eliasz / Leszczynski / Wlecialowski / Kedzierski families. So here is my list (anyone else from here?):

Biechow (parish) – Biechow, Piestrzec, Wojcza, Wojeczka, Chrzanow

Pacanow (parish) – Pacanow, Zabiec, Kwasow

Various Other Parishes/Villages – Zborowek, Ksiaznice, Swiniary, Oblekon, Trzebica, Szczucin and I am sure many of the rest of villages surrounding these villages, but I have yet to see or connect the records to main branches of the family tree.

Now excuse me,  I must go get some more coffee.

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