Posts tagged ‘Polish Archive’

June 25, 2011

Polish Genealogy: Useful Websites #2 … Digital Archives, Libraries, Church Archives

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Yesterday I wrote about Poland’s great website resources that we in the English speaking world should be using. I was thinking of the State Archives (national/regional), Libraries, and Ecclesiastical Archives. Now these are not the civil registration offices (USC) nor are these the parish church books. These are the duplicate records in the archives.

Furthermore, I was emphasizing the resources that have online resources, like a catalog (in the case of the PRADZIAD database) or even better digital images of documents or historical items. Yesterday’s article was already running long. So today, I am including a sampling of these resources (while I test/cleanup the others). With these you should be able to find the others yourself. I also apologize that these are heavily influenced by where I have ancestors.

A word of note to my cautious readers. The digital libraries all use a product called Dj Vu ( a browser plug-in) from LizardTech. I strongly urge you to utilize this software! I have used it for years with no worries. It works in both MS Windows and in MAC OS. I have used with many types of browsers and can usually get it to work as an add-in/plug-in to the browser or as a local applet that runs on the PC.

As for the websites, I have some advice there as well. First off, if you are comfortable working in Polish (język polski) then you should use this language. The reason is some sites offer more content only in Polish. If you are language challenged, then your next best option is to look for a little flag. The flag looks like the UK’s Union Jack or the USA’s Old Glory or sometimes a hybrid of the two. Clicking on that icon usually translates a page’s content into “mostly” English. Some button or menus or other user interface features may still be in Polish. For the most part, the websites do not force you to use the accented letters (diacriticals). You should test to verify you get the same results in your searches by doing it both ways. Some websites offer a little keyboard to help Americans enter the diacriticals when they are necessary. The GenealogIndexer website actually had a nice keyboard (see image above) that included the Cyrillic characters (in case you are searching in Russian/Ukrainian/BeloRussian/etc.), Hebrew characters and other Euro/Slavic characters.

Stanczyk wishes to thank Poland and its many archives and museums for providing these resources. I promise to come visit as a tourist and a RESEARCHER because you so kindly made it possible for me to extend my vacation/holiday to do some historical/genealogical research by providing these resources ahead of time while I am still at home and can prepare. Final word of advice, to those planning a research trip to Poland; Try these websites out to help you on locating the resources and their locations and even the details (i.e. FONDS, etc.). Make yourself familiar with access rules or have your guide do the leg-work so you can walk right in and begin your research without delay. Do not forget or ignore the parishes or the USC offices (civil records authority, like county-clerk in USA) or cemeteries; make time for parishes and archives both to ensure you see as much as you possibly can in one trip.

Now my sample resources are in the table below:

Digital Content from Poland’s Archives / Museums / Churches English Translation Websites
Naczelna Dyrekcja Archiwów Państwowych The Head Office of State Archives http://archiwa.gov.pl/en/data-bases.html
MaloPolska Biblioteka Cyfrowa Digital Library of Malopolska (LittlePoland) http://mbc.malopolska.pl/dlibra
WielkoPolska Biblioteka Cyfrowa Digital Library of Greater Poland in Poznan http://www.wbc.poznan.pl/dlibra
Slaska Biblioteka Cyfrowa Digital Library of Silesia http://www.sbc.org.pl/dlibra
Podlaska Biblioteka Cyfrowa Digital Library of Podlaska http://pbc.biaman.pl/dlibra
Archiwum Główne Akt Dawnych AGAD – Central Archives of Historical Records http://www.agad.archiwa.gov.pl/
Archiwum Państwowe w Kielcach State Archive in Kielce http://www.kielce.ap.gov.pl/
Archiwum Państwowe w Rzeszowie State Archive in Rzeszów http://www.rzeszow.ap.gov.pl
Narodowe Archiwum Cyfrowe (NAC) National Digital Archives http://nac.gov.pl/en/node/58
NAC – Search Archives link Search the Archives (Lublin, Poznan, Warsaw, Hoover Inst.) http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/
Archiwum Diecezjalne – Kielce Kielce Diocessan Archives http://www.kielce.opoka.org.pl/?mod=contents&g=kuria&id=archiwum
Archiwum Diecezjalne – Tarnów Tarnów Diocessan Archives http://www.archiwum.diecezja.tarnow.pl
June 24, 2011

Shoemakers Guild Brothers, a Guild Book in Śląska Biblioteka Cyfrowa

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been searching for Shoemakers Guild (Chechy Szewskiego) books. I was in the Silesian Digital Library (aka Śląska Biblioteka Cyfrowa). I found this amazing guild book. It had nearly 360 pages to comb through and in Polish (with some Latin); so this will take a good bit of time to peruse. It seems to span about a century (1799-1899). The book as you might guess is mostly about Shoemakers and their various helpers. It also seemed to have another guild: the Tanners (Garbarskiego) in one part. Mostly it is about men ( a few women too) and their jobs. They seem to be very religious as I see many notes related to the church and/or it societies.

While there are many family names, I would have to say that the founding and sustaining family are the Miodonskich (Miodonski). It starts in the 1860’s and 1870’s. But after a few pages there is a colorful page with a drawing and then a good many pages with in an ornate border all in color detailing the people, works, and traditions of this guild’s brotherhood (and sisterhood). The colorful and ornate bordered pages (all hand drawn) start in 1799 and it is clear that a Miodonski is the founder of this guild.

Take a look for yourself here. The expanded book notes indicate a village named: Żywiec . I do not know about shoes, but today  they seem to be known for beer. Just a quick note tonight.

 

December 6, 2009

2009 Genealogy Treasure Finds

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been silent for far too long. Most of my silence is due to my Mac dying and a bad economy dictating that I cannot replace it right now. Lest you feel sorry for this jester, my other reason has been my job. I have been busy working and since August working on an important project vital to my company’s success. So I’ll thank the Lord for my job and the ability to take care of my wife and dog (Princess Java Argus Solomon Eliasz). I’ll get around to registering her with the AKC one of these days. I am thankful for JAVA  and TEREZA.

I am also thankful for a wonderful year in genealogy. I can look back and see how luck I was to find a kind soul in Biechow (Elzbieta) who mailed me my grandparent’s marriage record from the church and from the local USC.

I am thankful to Ann Faulkner of Michigan who was able to dig out my great-uncle Jan Eliasz/Elijasz and his death notice. From which I was able to get his death certificate. Next time back home to family, I will pay a visit to my great-uncle’s grave.

Those were huge! I am also thankful for meeting Jacek of Krakow. I met him in a Polish web site: genealodzy.pl. We swapped some images since our families were from the same villages (Biechow, Pacanow, Zborowek amongst others) and some laughs (due to my lack of proficiency with the Polish language). He also worked for me at the Pinczow Archive to research: Eliasz, Leszczynski & Wlecialowski.  It is to Jacek, that I am most thankful. He found my grandfather’s birth record ( and many of his siblings), he found an uncle we never knew about (but suspected must exist), he found Leszczynski and many Wlecialowski too. I am particularly grateful he found an Eliasz-Wlecialowski marriage record that solved a problem about how the Eliasz were related to Wlecialowski. In so doing he made a genealogical friend of mine, a third cousin! I am most thankful to Jacek fo rhis finding the marriage churhc record of my great-grandparents: Tomasz Leszczynski & Aniela Major (yes this is a Polish name). He also found three pages of alegata describing the marriage banns — believe when I have a MAC again, I will post pictures. This must have been a pre-cursor to a marriage license — it has a postage stamp on the top of the 1st page! It was from 1885, so the pre-amble and the final summation are in Russian/Cyrillic, but the middle was in Polish  — and I was able to read and understand it; Much good info there.

So all-in-all, I’d have to say that 2009 was an unparalleled year for genealogy.  How did your genealogy search go this year?

–Stanczyk

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