Posts tagged ‘PA’

September 24, 2013

The Library of Congress & PA State Library — #Genealogy, #Archives, #Libraries

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PAStateLib_1PAStateLib_2

The Library of Congress

(LOC) has published a finding resource listing 71 links to the 50 states, online digital collections. That is found here .

The PA State Library — Has a digital collections, very similar to the digital collections found at seekingmichigan.org [Editor: also in LOC list for MI].

From Abe Lincoln, to Ben Franklin, to Coal Mining History, to WWI there are many PA treasures here:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/collections/8728/digital_collections_at_the_state_library_of_pennsylvania/524375

I chose to start in their WWI Collection,  which had a few choices to pick from, so I chose the top pick (Mahanoy City):

American Red Cross. Pennsylvania Chapter. Mahanoy City. In Memoriam Of Those Who, Coming from the District within the Limits of the Mahanoy City, Red Cross Chapter, Quakake to Girardville [inclusive] Made the Supreme Sacrifice in the Great War for Democracy, known as “The World War” 1917-1919. Mahanoy City, Pa., [1920]
This is a six page memorial to the fallen veterans who lived in Mahanoy City in the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania.

http://accesspadr.org/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/sstlp-wwi&CISOPTR=411&CISOSHOW=405

In truth the PA State Library’s digital collection is large enough that this jester will need to spend some time exploring, but I thought I would share my initial impression.

So LOC, a tip of the jester’s hat  to you for compiling a very useful resource of state libraries who have online digital collections. These are historical in nature, but the obvious application to genealogy make these valuable resources to the genealogical researcher too.

July 2, 2013

4th of July / 150th Anniversary of Battle of Gettysburg

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Battle of GettysburgYesterday’s (1st July 2013) Philadelphia Inquirer [go to your local library] had a reproduction of their newspaper from 1863 commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

This is running now along with the Welcome America Festival in Philly. There are Civil War reenactments this week in Gettysburg.

Happy Fourth of July!

 

See Also …

Philadelphia ‘Living Monument’ of the Civil War — #History, #150th Anniversary [16 May 2013]

April 1, 2012

1940 US Census – Here’s What Enumeration Districts I’m Researching

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

2nd-April-2012 (72 years are up)

Here is Stanczyk’s initial research list before there are complete indexes.

Enumeration Districts (EDs)

By State/County:

MI-Wayne-Detroit84-590,  84-710,   84-583,  84-584,  84-586,  84-1246,  84-1471

MI-Macomb — 50-70A

MI-St Clair — 74-14

NY-Erie-Depew — 15-37

OH-Lucas-Toledo — 95-217,  95-221

PA-Philadelphia — 51-22

Families

MI — Eliasz, Epperly, Gawlik/Gawlikowski, Gronek, Kedzierski, Vespek, Wlecial/Wlecialowski

NY — Leszczynski (Frank, Michael, Teofil)

OH — Eliasz, Mylek, Sobieszczanski

PA — Solomon

Related Spreadsheet

http://mikeeliasz.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/1940-us-census-9-days-away-genealogy-preparation/

Related 1940 Census Info (EDs, etc)

http://www.archives.gov/research/census/1940/finding-aids.html#maps

February 27, 2012

#PA #Genealogy – Access To Vital Statistics — Public Access, Privacy Law, PA Act 110, SB 361

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PA Act 110 – Public Records (formerly known as Senate Bill 361)

This bill amends the Act of June 29, 1953 (P.L. 304, No. 66), known as the Vital Statistics Law of 1953, to provide for public access to certain birth and death certificates after a fixed amount of time has passed. This legislation provides that such documents become public records 105 years after the date of birth or 50 years after the date of death.

This is a mixed bag, but at least its consistent. I wish it was 72 years  (like the census) instead of 105. Also the 50 years after death is way too long. Dead is dead. Maybe you could make a case for 5-10 years. By doing greater than 30-35 years you are forcing genealogy research to skip generations since the current generation would die before gaining access. Genealogists will have to will research plans to children in PA.

The indexes (I hate the word indices) are here: Birth Index (1906 — so far that’s it) | Death Index (1906-1961).   By the way, you will need the American Soundex of the last name as this is how the records are sorted:  American Soundex of Surname, followed by alphabetical on FirstName. Use Steve Morse’s Soundex One-Step page.

January 27, 2012

Pathways & Passages – Journal of PGSCT&NE — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Society

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, thinks he just got the new issue of Pathways & Passages. I’m not certain because it says 2011 on the cover and in the page footers. But of course, who doesn’t have a hard time writing the new year on their checks.

That aside, their column, “Online Resources” was particularly good this issue (whichever it was, Summer 2011 -or- Summer 2012).

For the PA Polonia …

They had two online resources. For Schuykill County, PA (moje zona has family from that county — in fact I stumbled upon this site a few years ago). So I can state it is a very good from my own experience.

They did mention Lackawanna County, PA (but did not give the URL — so off to Google for you). There are marriages: 1885-1995 and an index to wills.

The Next Online Resources …

Passaic County, NJ – Naturalizations.  This turned out to be an EXCELLENT find! I found a Jozef Zwolski  whose ship manifest I had found before. Now Jozef was a brother of Roman Zwolski and both of these men are sons Jan Zwolski & Petronella Elijasz ! They happen to be from both Biechow & Pacanow parishes. Joseph’s Declaration of Intent was listed and you could view the image (and download a PDF of the document)! So I now have a birthday for Joseph and it matches up well to his ship manifest and his residences in Russian-Poland match up well too — so I am pretty convinced I have my ancestor.

Joseph apparently served in WWI and is taking advantage of privileges as a citizen soldier to become an American.

Antwerp Police Immigration Index. This last resource given, I would not have thought to look into (not having any Belgians in my direct lineage). But apparently, if you stayed longer than normal before your passage to American (from Antwerp port), you had to register with Antwerp Police. A good many Polish must have fell into that category. I did not find any of mine, but did find some whose last names match those in my family tree. If you do find your ancestor — you have a name and a village to ascertain that you have the correct person. But you will gain a birthday. This is another nice database from  FamilySearch.org.

I am glad I belong to some of the various Polish Genealogical Societies — these little resources sometimes pay big dividends.

August 23, 2011

Earth – Status – #Shakin’

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

A 5.8 MAGNITUDE  EarthQuake struck  DC and felt as far NYC. Locally, the quake ended court early  in MontCo, PA.

There is absolutely No Truth to rumor that Democrats & TeaParty Republicans agreed on something.

 

Just  A Whole Lot Of #Shakin’ Going On.

 

–Stanczyk & Family  fine [no barking by Java]

March 1, 2011

Stan “The Man” Musial – Presidential Medal of Honor

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

This jester always eagerly awaits, Fred Hoffman‘s Gen Dobry newsletter every month. As usual I was intrigued by an article. They wrote about Stan Musial and how on February 15, 2011 how President Obama presented him (along with others) the Presidential Medal of Honor. Like moje zona, I keep a database of my ethnicity in my head. This also intrigued me as the MUSIAL (or more likely, MUSIAŁ) name is also found in my grandparents parish and it is found in some abundance in Detroit / Toledo areas. In fact, there is at least one Musial-Eliasz combination from Detroit/Toledo, so I mused, “Was Stan the Man’s family from my ancestral villages?”.

That is the premise of today’s blog. I went to the Wikipedia link above and found out that Stan’s father was Lukasz and that Stan was born in Donora, PA (nestled on the banks of the Monongahela River in South-West corner of PA). Since Stan was born in Donora, PA, then perhaps it was his father who emigrated to the USA. So I went  to Ancestry.com and searched their Immigration records for Lukasz. Of course, as most Polish names are, it was misspelled (Musial was correct, but Lukasz was spelled/indexed as Lukacz). Lukasz came from Myslowa and arrived in the US on 30th-January-1910 on the President Grant ship at the age of 16 (implies a birth year about 1894)!  He was heading to Donora, PA. I’d say, I found my man. Oh Stan,  if you are interested, your grandfather’s name is Piotr. Lukasz’s ship manifest said he was born in Myslowa. Stanczyk did not know the name of Myslowa, so I went to the mapa.szukacz.pl website tried to locate it. It came up with three possibilities in present day Poland and all were spelled Myslow. I did check the excellent reference by Brian Lenius and it did show a Myslowa and indicated its parish was:  Podwoloczyska [the ship manifest did indicate Austria-Polish].  So no matter which of the four locales are correct, the MUSIALs were NOT from my ancestral villages.

But if you are related to “Stan the Pan” Musial, then perhaps this is the lead you need to follow up on. Congratulations Stan Musial on your well deserved Medal of Honor.

October 12, 2010

Count Kazimierz Pulaski

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

With this being National Polish Heritage Month and a good bit about Pulaski being written or even televised and of course the parades, I thought I would add to the milieu of this worthy American.

I said American, because on November 7th, 2009, Count Pulaski became an honorary American citizen, posthumously. It was put forth by Senator (now President) Obama. He is one of only seven individuals so honored, five posthumously. Count Pulaski saved General George Washington’s life with his valor and service, without which there might never have been a USA. It was from this heroic action that he received his Brigadier General commission.

Sadly, the Brigadier General was killed in service to our nation, at the siege of Savannah. His his final resting place is still disputed between a burial at sea and a location in Georgia. He was the Father of the American Calvary. His banner for his legion was created by some Moravian women from Bethlehem, PA. There are nearly 8,000 mentions of “Count Pulaski” in Footnote.com database. Many are in the Continental Papers, but today’s genealogical / historical treasures come from the PA Archives (also in Footnote.com). Since this jester now resides in PA, I have included two pages from the PA Archives of the soldiers of Pulaski’s Legion who were from PA.

Pennsylvanians in Pulaski’s Legion:

Captain Henry Bedkin
Quarter-Master John Shrader
Sergeant Richard Laird

Privates…
Isaac Andrew
John Bentley
Thomas Bond
Frederich Boyer
Richard Cheney
William Coram
Frederich Cook
William Furnshield
Joseph Fogg
William Formshell
Joseph Gale
Benjamin Johnston
Martin Miller
Peter Miller
John Myer
James Rolls
Frederich Ruger
Peter Snyder
Edward Smith
John Smith 3rd
William Sommerlott
Henry Walker
George Ziegler
George Yohe

Teamster
John Shuler

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