Posts tagged ‘Opatowiec’

December 22, 2014

1772 Polish Wojewodztwo, Diocese, and Deaconates — #Polish #Genealogy #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

1772_ParishesInPoland_mapXVIsegmentStanczyk is busy with holiday chores, including wishing you, my dear readers a Happy Holidays & a Happy, Healthy New Year too. As most regular readers know, I spend a lot of my time writing about genealogy with a focus on Polish genealogy and in particular in the geographical areas surrounding my paternal grandparent’s ancestral villages (Biechow & Pacanow in old wojewodztwa Kieleckie, now a part of SwietoKrzyskie woj.). Like most areas in and around Eastern /Central Europe the borders change … frequently. So today’s blog article is about 1772 just before the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth was partitioned amongst the neighboring empires (you know who you are/were, you Black Eagle Empires).

It is interesting to note that Pacanow was a much more important regional village in 1772. It was in fact, a deaconate, subordinate to the diocese of Krakow in the Gniezno Wojewodztwa. At that time, there were only two Wojewodztwo (Provinces): Gniezno in the west and Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg, Leopolis, the city of Lions in whatever language) in the east. Any other wojewodztwo were in the Lithuanian portion of the Commonwealth. So the civil/religious hierarchy of the time was: Poland->Gniezno->Krakow->Pacanow, which  along with Opatowiec deaconate contained most of the villages this author writes about [you might be tempted to toss in Polaniec and Sandomierz too]. That area is shown in the map at the top. I do a lot of research for my family in the above map, west of Polaniec and south of Pinczow (the lower/left quadrant) in almost every parish north of the Vistula (Wisla) river I have located a record for someone in my family tree  —  you might say, the bones of Stanczyk’s DNA are rooted here.

So let me enumerate the parishes from this 1772 map that are present in my genealogy:

Biechow & Pacanow (grandparents), Stopnica, Ksziaznice, Zborowek, Swiniary, Olesnica, Szczebrzusz, Beszowa, Opatowiec, Busko and probably another 8-9 other villages with a person here or there. I think Solec too, but I have not found that record yet. I also a few stray, unconnected family records from Szczucin (the only parish south of the Vistula … so far). Are these in your bones too? Drop me a line in the New Year and we can compare family trees.

By the way, this research is from the PGSA’s CD-ROM, “The Latin Church in the Polish Commonwealth in 1772” [ISBN – 978-0-924207-12-9 ].

February 12, 2012

#RootsTech Research – 2012 — #Polish, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, prepares for going to an archive or research library. So when I was awarded the prize of going to #RootsTech, I immediately started my preparations.

I favor the microfilm which are free to read in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

Biechów –  MF # 1257788 (parts 8-10) which covered the years 1875-1877

Pacanów – MF #’s 1192352,  1192351 which covered 1876-1877   &  1875 [respectively]

Beszowa – 1257787

Tumlin – 1808856, 939955

Olesnica – 1807620 (parts 4-10)

Opatowiec – 1807620 (parts 11-16),  1192351 (parts 1-7)

Stopnica – 1807635 (parts 1-6)

Swiniary – 939951

And those were just the Polish villages (there were many more in the USA, but that is another floor).

Some of the above are because I am expanding the search for records to surrounding parishes. That is called a proximity/circle search. As it turned out, the proximity also included nearby parishes where affiliated families said they were from. So I was looking for GAWLIK in Opatowiec and GRONEK in Stopnica/Olesnica.  I always checked for ELIJASZ/LESZCZYŃSKI/WLECIAŁOWSKI in all villages. I was disappointed that I did not find KĘDZIERSKI in Tumlin.

I had prepared for some books (and/or maps) too. Sadly, many of these items were not located in the library and my three levels of assistants all failed to find them or even to explain why they could not be found:

943.8 E7sh (Malopolska cadastral. This was a high priority, so it was disappointing not to be able to locate these).

943.84 R2e (a register of Landowners — also not locatable).

A couple of books I did find, were a disappointment because they did not contain any of my family. Cest la vie — that too is a part of the research. All told I had 10 spreadsheet pages of  Family History Catatlog Items!  That may seem like a lot; But it is always better to be over prepared because as you see some items cannot be located, some are dead-ends, and some quickly show they do not contain what you are looking for after all. Being under prepared is just a time waster, but they do have PCs available to do catalog look-ups — so it is not a show stopper.

I dutifully check them off, as I use them and some times I note my findings (or lack there of).

Future Research

Next time I will have to search more thoroughly through Beszowa and exhaustively too [for Paluch]. I will also search Dobrowoda parish too [for Major]. I will have to dedicate a lot of time to Swinary too [for Elijasz, Leszczynski, Kordos, etc.] and also Szczucin.

I will have to find a way to get to Buffalo and find my great-uncle Franciszek Leszczynski’s records and hopefully his brother Jan (aka John) Leszczynski too.

I of course need to get to Poland and visit the actual archives and parishes of my ancestors to see those records that have not yet been microfilmed — I need to write down this research plan. I already know where the civil and diocesan archives are and of course the parishes themselves. I will need an abundance of time there to get around the language and customs and the learning curve of using these resources.

How do you prepare for your genealogy trips?

February 11, 2012

Genealogical Finds From #RootsTech (Family History Library)

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk was in Salt Lake City, UT for RootsTech a week and a half ago. I thoroughly enjoyed the intersection of my two intellectual pursuits: technology & genealogy. I was not the only person at RootsTech who said they had a foot in each world. I think the conference planners think this is a mash-up between users & developers; And it definitely is that. But there are a large number of us tech savants, who are also avid  genealogists.

Success 1

In an earlier article  (7-Feb-2012), I wrote about an exciting find of two of my great-grandmother’s siblings marrying each other (a Major & a Paluch). Because it was not an Elijasz nor a Leszczynski record and yet I found it because of an Social Network Analysis experiment I conducted last year, I investigated that record and made an outstanding find.

Today I wanted to talk about a cousin of mine from TN whose grandmother turned out to be a cousin of my grandfather. My cousin Kim showed me her grandparent’s marriage records (both civil & church) and we discovered that her great-grandmother was my great-grand-aunt. We also saw that her grandfather (Adam Gawlikowski) was from Opatowiec in the Polish Church Record (Sweetest Heart of Mary Church in Detroit). Well there were a couple of Opatowiec — so I took the opportunity of being in Salt Lake to narrow down which parish might be the correct one.

Success 2

1st part of Rec #27 - Antoni Gawlik

I found my cousin Kim’s great-grandparent’s having children in Opatowiec (in the Kazimierz Wielka powiat, old woj. Kielce — LDS MF# 1192351 & 1807620). In fact, I found her great-granduncle Antoni Gawlikowski ‘s birth record with the correct parents: Martin Gawlik & Maryanna Lisowskich. In fact, if Kim is reading my blog, you should rent LDS MF # 1192350 and you may be able find your great-grandparents’ marriage record and many other Gawliks/Lisowskich, potentially all the way back to 1614 !     MF# 1192351 & 1807620 were in Russian, but I am betting that almost all of MF # 1192350 (1614-1870) will be in Latin.   Sadly, it appears her grandfather Adam was born after the end of the last year in MF 1807620. But I did find three siblings of Adam (besides Antoni) that we did not know of  before:  Jan Gawlik,  Ludwik Gawlik, and Maryanna Gawlik. I also saw that the Gawlik name was written without the ‘ski’ at the end. Sadly both Ludwik and Maryanna died in 1880. Perhaps Jan survived into adulthood. He may have stayed in Poland and took care of his parents. I am sorry that Antoni’s birth record fell across two pages in the church book, requiring two camera shots.

2nd part of record #27 - Antoni Gawlik

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