Posts tagged ‘Newspapers’

March 22, 2014

#Genealogy #Polish – Haller’s Army in Newspapers.com

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been exploring Newspapers.com. I am a bit disappointed at its overall effectiveness, which I attribute to poor OCR capabilities and a difficult user interface that provides a disappointing user experience (UX).

However, it is not without its redeeming qualities. For example Newspaper.com has a Clipping capability which produces a PDF document that you can share in social network web sites or even make public in Newspapers.com to attract others doing similar research. So today’s blog article is about that clipping capability.

The above is from Stanczyk’s twitter post and you need to follow the link to see the PDF clipping on Newspapers.com.

Please do me a favor and click the link and let me know whether you see the clipping and can download it. Please email me back your results. Thanks!

Twitter Post(s)

P.S.

Stanczyk, thanks Buz Kuzan  for working with me to get the “Clippings” to be accessible. The links should work no matter who you are. Check out the “Comments on this article” for a couple more clippings!

July 4, 2011

#Polish #Genealogy – Historical Dziennik Polski (Detroit) Newspaper

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk wishes all Americans a Happy Fourth Of July !

I just wanted to update my readers that my page on the Dziennik Polski (Detroit, MI) Newspaper has been updated to include a new repository: PARI – Polonica Americana Research Institute on Orchard Lake, St Mary’s campus, whose Director is the well known Ceil Wendt Jensen (who has ancestors from Stanczyk’s ancestral village, Pacanow).

Their holdings are 1904-1920 on microfilm and 1930’s-? in bundles of actual newspapers.

Mój pies (my dog), Java wants everyone to keep their dog safe today and not to lose your dogs due to the fireworks and the fright they cause in dog’s sensitive ears.

July 2, 2011

#Polish #Genealogy – Library Of Congress Chronicling America

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk was reading the Genealogical Society of PA email/newsletter. They were talking about the Library of Congress’ (LOC)  Chronicling America program. This program is about saving/collecting/digitizing Historical US Newspapers, including Ethnic Language (i.e. Polish) newspapers.

Casual readers of Stanczyk will realize that I favor using Historical newspapers to fill in gaps or to provide context in your family history. My own ojciec (father) told me about an ethnic newspaper (Dziennik Polski) that his mother used to read daily in Detroit. That was over a meal the night before Stanczyk was going to the state of Michigan’s Library & Archives and I had plans to read microfilm of Dziennik Polski. So, on the basis of this kismet I searched Dziennik Polski and the first time I searched, I found my grandmother listed as a mother giving birth to a baby boy (my uncle Ted) and it listed the address where my grandparents lived so I was able to confirm it was my family. Thereafter, I was hooked on Historical newspapers.

At any rate, I digress (but I hope I have motivated you to look). Stanczyk’s own Dziennik Polski (Detroit) newspaper page came from the LOC’s Chronicling America program and adding their info to my own research to create my Rootsweb page. That is specific to just the Dziennik Polski (Detroit) newspaper (with a small mention to other MI Polish language newspapers). But today I searched the LOC for Polish Language newspapers in the LOC and my results are below:

American Historical Polish Language US Newspapers in LOC – http://t.co/CeEjpWv

Happy and Blessed 4th of July everyone !

June 25, 2011

Historical Newspapers – Gazeta Kielecka 1899

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk was combing the many Digital Libraries in and around my ancestral villages looking for clues, contacts or vital records as published in periodicals or guild books. So I was at: Swietokrzyska Digital Library

That is when I found this funeral ad. This I knew in a minute when I saw, as it was very familiar from reading the Dziennik Polski (Detroit) ethnic newspaper, which is itself an historic newspaper now. At any rate, I hate to leave vital records behind and since this was the only vital record in the 4 pages of the Gazeta Kielecka, I could afford to spend some of my effort to help some other poor genealogist(s).

Poor Jozefa was survived by her husband and children (no names provided). She died in Pinczow on January 17th, 1899 at the age of 37 (born/ur. about 1862). Her maiden name was Baranow (Baranowskich family) and married name was Pogorzelska. It is unclear to me whether she was the wife of a duty collector or whether her occupation was duty/excise tax collector (inspektora akcyzy).

 

Jozefa Pogorzelska z Baranow died (zmarla) 17-Jan-1899
June 10, 2011

Dziennik Polski (Detroit) – Historical Daily Newspaper

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

If you are a loyal reader of Stanczyk’s then you must be aware of the penchant for ethnic newspapers; In particular for Polish language ethnic newspapers. I like using Historical newspapers to fill-in otherwise missing info or spots in my research where there are gaps and no other viable resource to turn to.

They used to say, “Everyone gets in the newspaper three times (if you are lucky): birth announcement, marriage announcement and death notice.”. If you are {un}lucky then perhaps you will also have other magazine or newspaper articles written about you too.

Well Stanczyk has a page dedicated to the places where you can research the Dziennik Polski (Polish Daily) of Detroit, MI. The Dziennik Polski page list the archives where you can read/research your family history. Now this jester needs to add in some more info from Orchard Lakes, St. Mary, MI. They host a program on their campus called, “Polonica Americanna Research Institue” (PARI). Ceil Wendt Jensen, the Director of PARI at Polish Mission has informed me that they are another source of Dziennik Polski (Detroit) newspapers. They have both bound copies (from the 1930’s and forward) and microfilm from 1904-1920 [they are still completing their inventory of microfilm], but that range is close.

So look for this jester to make a visit to their campus sometime this year and see for himself what is happening at PARI. Look for an update after my visit. Also look for an update to my Dziennik Polski web page with the updated info when I have verified the findings.

Oh, one more thing, loyal readers, please consider answering the call in  their “Friend of Polish Mission Membership Drive”. Their membership form is here.

January 24, 2009

John Eliasz

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

While I was toiling away at the Salt Mines in Wilmington, DE, I was musing about the long hard toil for the past three years that Stanczyk had been doing since I made my grandfather’s brother Jan Eliasz (great-uncle) an emphasis of my genealogical research. saltminewieliczka

I had brief snatches of info on John Eliasz. I had found his actual birth record in LDS microfilm, so I knew his actual birth date. I also had his World War I draft registration which was kind enough to give me a second birth date to cause me to doubt the birth record I had found was actually his. I also had the 1920 & 1930 US Censuses.

From family lore, I had that “Uncle John” had died around the same time as my grandfather (who died 06-January-1930). There was even a memory of him being buried at Mt. Olivet cemetery (Detroit, MI). Well family lore had been mostly accurate and my grandfather had been buried at Mt Olivet, so the facts seem to fit. So year after year I would call Mt Olivet and inquire about John/Jan Eliasz and they never did have info on him, but one year they located a record on an infant Eliasz baby named Henry who would have been an uncle if hed had survived his premature birth. So I kept hope that Mt Olivet  would eventually locate the record of my great-uncle after all my persistence had located a previously unknown uncle (who even my dad did not know had been born).

In the meantime I began searching the Dziennik Polski (Detroit) newspaper which I learned that my Busia read every day. I had the rotten luck of finding a family birth announcement the very first time and so was hooked. Now I have a whole web site dedicated to Dziennik Polski (Detroit) . I have collected many vital records of  Poles from Detroit, but I have not found John Eliasz’s death announcement. At last year’s (2008) United Polish Genealogical Societies conference in Salt Lake City’s famous Family History Library I dedicated an abundance of time to Detroit microfilm for naught — no John Eliasz. I pestered 2nd and 3rd cousins to ask parents or to look through funeral cards for any clue.

For 3+ years I had no luck other than an occasional mention in Detroit City directory. Last year I posted to MI-Polish asking for help — no luck. This year I thought I might post to MI-Macomb (County) mailing list asking for help. But after three years I did not really expect a reply. Well this was one jester who was fooled. A kindly genealogist took note of Stanczyk’s plea and took the scant information provided and paid Stanczyk a little act of genealogical kindness. This researcher, Ann Faulkner (who I am sure some will recognize), used her awesome skills and the sensational resources at Mt Clemens Public Library (MCPL) and she found two scraps on John Eliasz!  She posted the info and I confirmed that both of her findings were indeed my great-uncle since she had included little details that only made sense to someone in my family (by naming in-laws and friends). She perseveered through the slavic genealogist’s worse curse: misspelled/mistranscribed names and found John Elias and John Elijasz (both common variants on ELIASZ). So I just wanted to take a moment and to thank Ann Faulkner — honored genealogist and helper to many. Thanks Ann, you brought a tear to this jester’s face.

Now I have his death date/cemetery and as a bonus another great-uncle (Thomas Eliasz) in Poland.

Well I really must go, my Internet broadband signal is getting weak here in the bowels of the salt mine.

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