Posts tagged ‘Coffee’

May 5, 2012

Cinco de Mayo, Napoleon, & Coffee ???

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

If it is one thing this blog stands for, its coffee. No coffee … No blog!

Now Stanczyk has been a big fan of Napoleon primarily for two reasons:

1. Codex Napoleon – What it did for genealogical records (2 witnesses, standardized format, etc.)

2. Napoleon’s Army – His effusive praise for Polish soldiery and of course for Napoleon himself being a royal pain to the partitioning powers of Poland.

Today, I must add a third reason in praise of Napoleon. The Emperor was a coffee aficionado! He is reputed to be a very BIG coffee drinker (ten, twenty, thirty or more cups a day ???). Once again he had effusive praise … for St Helena Coffee! What you may not know was that while he was exiled to St Helena (in the South Atlantic off the coast of Africa) which was largely run by Britain’s East India Company [should not the Emperor have developed a taste for tea?] he lauded the island coffee.

After Napoleon died on 5th-May-1821, his praise of the island’s coffee, caused it to become popular amongst the French. So as you sip your favorite Cinco de Mayo beverage today, be it a margarita or a Kentucky mint julep, this jester will be sipping some St Helena Coffee in honor of the Emperor. After all, his heir and nephew, Napoleon III (Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte) and I have a birthday in common — perhaps that is a fourth reason to be a fan.

July 15, 2011

#Coffee, #CoffeeBreak – Animated GIF

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Thanks for joining me for coffee !    Mmmmmmmmm thats what I needed.

;-)      Stanczyk

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July 7, 2011

Ancestral Villages – Poland, Kielce (old woj.), Stopnica (pow.)

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stopnica Pas 47 Slup 32 Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny 1938 (scale 1:100,000)

This picture is a map of the villages that Stanczyk’s ancestors were from. The river in the South-East corner of the map is the Wisla / Vistula river. To the South-central area are a few more villages that could not be shown: Oblekon and also Szczucin (across the Vistula). North of the Vistula, was the Russian-Poland partition. South of the Vistula was the Austrian-Poland partition. These partitions arose from Austria (aka Austrian-Hungarian Empire), Prussia, and Russia colluding in 1772, 1792, and finally in 1794 to divvy up the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth until Poland had vanished from the map of Europe for about 125 years, until it reappeared in 1918. Between 1797 and 1815 various ex-expatriate Polish legions fought along side Napoleon, so the final boundaries of the three partitions continued to evolve until 1815 when Napoleon was finally defeated for good. It is ironic to me that this region on the map above changed hands so many times and that I had ancestors in two kingdoms who would marry across parishes (and indeed national boundaries).

So it was not really surprising to me that my Busia (grandmother) spoke: Polish, Russian and German and most Catholics prior to Vatican II did know a smattering of Latin since church masses were often in Latin. Indeed, my father related to me that my grandmother was fluent enough to make money during the Great Depression by translating letters to/from English to/from  Polish/Russian/German for Americans to be able to carry on correspondences in the old country.

Stanczyk remembers my grandmother speaking to me as a child in perfect English (with the lovely/charming Central European accent). I also vividly remember that after her stroke, she could only speak Polish (her native language). I would converse with my dad acting as translator between us in her kitchen over percolated coffee (ye gads — has it been nearly a half century of coffee drinking for me) from when I was about five or six years old.  My dad laughingly relates how when he was a boy, my grandmother would chastise him that his Polish was no good and that he should speak to her in English. Obviously his Polish was good enough that years later,  the three of us could chit-chat over coffee quite comfortably.

Stanczyk’s remembrances have caused me to digress. The point of this map was to list the villages where I have found vital records / church records for my Eliasz / Leszczynski / Wlecialowski / Kedzierski families. So here is my list (anyone else from here?):

Biechow (parish) – Biechow, Piestrzec, Wojcza, Wojeczka, Chrzanow

Pacanow (parish) – Pacanow, Zabiec, Kwasow

Various Other Parishes/Villages – Zborowek, Ksiaznice, Swiniary, Oblekon, Trzebica, Szczucin and I am sure many of the rest of villages surrounding these villages, but I have yet to see or connect the records to main branches of the family tree.

Now excuse me,  I must go get some more coffee.

January 20, 2009

Inauguration Day

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

i_red

nauguration Day has arrived and there can be no larger historic moment than this one today (01/20/2009), which is the Inauguration of America’s 44th President, Barack H. Obama. Stanczyk however is of mixed moods. Alas, his ticket to the swearing-in and the seating at the parade were pulled last minute in a bureaucratic snafu that finds Stanczyk in Audubon, PA (home of the French American Naturalist for whom the Audubon Society is named — John James Audubon).

Stanczyk had planned to bring his grandmother’s Naturalization Papers, ala Edward Zwick, the director of “Defiance” did when he filmed Defiance in Poland/Lithuania/ByeloRussia. Stanczyk’s grandparents came from the Russian-Poland partition, in what the Russians called the Kielce gubernya (and the Poles Kielce wojewodztwo) at the time of the 1880’s it was in the Stopnica powiat.

woj_kielce_pow_stopnica

kingdomofpolandmap_18151

Kingdom of Poland (Russian – Poland partition)   •   Kielce woj.  Stopnica pow.  •

So this fool was outdone by an even better fool and my attempt to mix my travels and my history with my family not to mention my potential cocktail fodder at palace retinue happenings was bolloxed. At this historic moment let me pause my musings for some coffee whilst I watch the coronation, excuse me, the inauguration.

Don’t forget every administration requires a fool and in these times I am available. Of course, I realize that Washington D.C. is rife with fools, but you can still pick an erudite fool who can stand out from the many and perhaps correct the omission of a Slavic from your Cabinet. God Bless Obama!

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