Posts tagged ‘Blog’

July 27, 2012

Genealogy and Social Media — #Genealogy, #Facebook

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

There are 901 Million active Facebook users as of March 2012, according to HowManyAreThere.org  (http://www.howmanyarethere.org/how-many-facebook-users-are-there-2012/). Facebook is estimated to break one Billion users before 2012 ends (Mashable source:  http://mashable.com/2012/01/12/facebook-1-billion-users/). According to Gregory Lyons, a senior analyst at iCrossing, Facebook will reach the milestone in August [2012].

Do I have your attention genealogists? One seventh of the world’s population is on Facebook – perhaps your 2nd and 3rd cousins are there waiting for you to engage them in some family history. Skype has nearly 107 Million “Real Users” and recently hit 41.5 Million concurrent users !

So being social can help you reach more people who may have a piece to your family history. I have searched Facebook with modest success for the ‘ELIASZ’ or ‘ELIJASZ’ family name. Not everyone will friend you anymore.  I have had success in SKYPE finding an ‘ELIJASZ’ family member in my grandfather’s ancestral village of Pacanow in Poland. I once had a very lucky success with a social network in Poland, named nasza-klasa.pl (now more easily found at http://nk.pl/ ). Now this jester is minimally conversant in Polish and my “cousin” in Poland was zero conversant in English. But, I was able to use Google’s Translator (English to Polish and vice versa) with success although it did generate some laughter at times. The final result was a letter from Poland with a copy of my grandparents’ marriage record from the actual church book in Biechow, Poland! Nasza-Klasa also yielded two 2nd cousins who were born in Poland (one since moved to the US) and we keep in touch via Facebook.

How else can you use social media to aid your genealogy? Write a genealogy blog (like this blog for example). I went to a recent Polish/Slavic genealogy seminar this year and spoke to a fellow blogger, Donna Pointkouski, who writes the genealogy blog, “What’s Past Is Prologue”. Donna called genealogy blogs, “2nd Cousin Bait” . She said by writing about your genealogy searches, successes and family members, your blog can lure these more distant family tree members to you. It works because search engines like Google or Bing find your blog posts and index key words (tags/categories) and proper nouns in their databases and out they pop when 2nd/3rd cousins are trying to Google their family trees. Stanczyk has personally located two 2nd cousins and one 3rd cousin via the blog. One 2nd cousin even gave me a picture of a previously unknown grand-aunt from before 1910  — jackpot! I was then able to locate that grand-aunt in microfilm from the LDS Family History Library for her children’s birth records in Poland.

A couple more blog tips –  Sprinkle your blog posts with the lingua franca of your ethnic lineage to lure readers from your ancestral home. Finally on your blog software (WordPress,  Blogger,  Tumblr, etc.) – get the widget(s) to share your blog posts on your other social media accounts: Facebook,  Twitter,  LinkedIn,  Google+, etc.  Make sure you get the widest exposure possible to lure your family from all over. Ask family and friends to add your blog/tweets to their Flipboard and possibly ‘star’ the better posts for you to up your Klout.

Lastly, you may want to put your family tree online. Some of my greatest finds have come from collaborating with other genealogists on Ancestry.com. It is the largest collection of genealogists and paid genealogy subscribers — serious genealogists. These people found me and my family who as it turned out were a part of their family tree too. I cannot count the number of family members I have met from Ancestry.com. Let me tell you that my greatest finds were from a woman whose family I and my father thought were only friends from the “old country” whose families renewed their friendship here in the US. From this woman (Kim), who I helped out by reading her grandparents’ marriage record from a Polish church in Detroit. What do the two of us discover, but her great-grandmother was an ELIJASZ from Pacanow. As it turned out, her great-grandmother was my great-grandfather’s sister and that the two of us shared a great-great-grandfather — we were 3rd cousins! So we were blood relatives not just family friends as our parents had thought. I found out my father was her father’s best man — neither of us knew that beforehand. Her grandmother (Rose Wlecialowski) was a best friend of my grandmother. I thought I had never met this third cousin … wrong!  She had photos of me in her family pictures. We were so young neither had memories of the other. She had pictures of me as a 3 year old child that I did not have, with my young father on her grandmother’s farm. She had a picture of my young grandmother from the 1930’s with her grandmother!  This was a B-O-N-A-N-Z-A!

I found her great-grandparents’ marriage record from Pacanow and had it copied from the church book. I translated it from Russian for her (and for my records too). It confirmed that we were indeed 3rd cousins and shared great-great-grandparents (Martin Elijasz & Anna Zasucha). I also eventually found the birth record from the first child that my paternal grandparents had together over in Poland and little Wladyslaw Jozef Elijasz had Rose Wlecialowski for his god-mother. Her grandmother was a god-mother to one of my “uncles”. Poor little Wladyslaw died in infancy and never made the trip to America with my grandparents and my aunt Alice. My father and the rest of my aunts and uncles were born here in the US.

So you see, your family is out there. You just don’t know it yet. Use the social networks, USA and overseas versions. Write a blog to lure your cousins. By all means join Ancestry.com too and upload your family tree to Ancestry.com. These will grow your family tree more completely than you could if you eschewed not to use the Internet. Make your family tree mobile — load it to your iPhone and start collaborating in the Cloud. You will thank me later!

–Stanczyk

March 12, 2012

ScribeFire – Blog Software / Chrome Browser Extension — #Technology, #Blog

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

     Stanczyk likes genealogy and Stanczyk loves technology. Hence why I had to go to RootsTech 2012. You are reading a blog article that I have created in ScribeFire 4.1 . Actually, I have been dabbling with ScribeFire, since I saw it mentioned by WordPress.

     It gives me a greater control over my fonts — somthing I have been missing, without getting my hands dirty with CSS/Styles. I have resisted doing too much HTML coding of my blog — I just want to muse and not have to do a lot of bit-fiddling to get my thoughts down on … uh CRT glass (or whatever glass you have on your mobile device).

Besides fonts and font sizes, superscripts, subscripts, it also gives me a convenient table tool and it will also  seek out related links for my article too (using Zemanata — see below) !



Related articles, courtesy of Zemanta:

So I recommend adding this extension to your browser if you use Chrome. I have gone back forth. I write some in ScribeFire and perhaps finish the article in WordPress (or vice versa). ScribeFire and WordPress,  both play well together and I get the best of both worlds. If you need these features, then get ScribeFire from the Chrome Store today .
March 9, 2012

WordPress Blogs Now Have Stats By Country!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

WordPress - Views By Country

Most Recent Flag Counter

   Stanczyk, for a long time has been using Flag Counter to get some idea of the access my blog has to the Old World.

The image to the far left is WordPress and is just for today (so far). The image to the near left is a cumulative count by country of Flag Counter for the last year. So I am thankful to WordPress for providing this analytic for my blog. It was always my hope to reach Poland and the other Central European nations where potential family tree members still reside. When I look at the analytics for the last year from WordPress, it seems people from about 60-70% of world’s landmass visit this blog! Come on China, you can bring that percentage up.

Thanks WordPress!

– Stańczyk kocha Polskę!

October 28, 2011

Minutia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

mi·nu·ti·a(e) –

a minor or trivial detail(s,  trifles)

Stanczyk has been mired in minutia or since it is a plethora of minutia, then perhaps minutiae is appropriate. However, I like the sound of minutia, while  minutiae sounds like a Japanese anime character. You see, I am mired in a mountain of minutia — even my writing has been infected by the minutia.

I Tweaked the Blog Again …

  1. I deleted a redundant page and now have the TABs (really menus, although not properly used that way) at the top. Down the side I now have: About StanczykGazetteers, &  Maps
  2. Gazetteers is now complete (or at least no longer under construction) and is a credible resource to start your work on gazetteers.
  3. The other two pages had slight tweaks to them.
  4. I am evolving the top TABs (Dziennik Polski, Biechow, Pacanow, etc.) in true menus, with menu items. I hope this will organize my materials for faster finding and utilization and to provide for more content, easily found and to make better use of that scarce real estate at the top.

Keep your eyes peeled.

Roots Technology …

Stanczyk has been trying to get his Roots Tech organized and ready to be deployed. As you know technology is slippery as an eel and hard to master/muster into a kind of electronic Swiss knife. My focus is portable genealogy — taking my research & tools with me into the field (uh, libraries, archives, churches/synagogues, courthouses, vital records offices, and cemeteries). So the smartphone and the cloud have been an emphasis. My latest tool in my bag of tricks is the iPhone app: ImageToText . This little application allows you to take a picture of a page of text, it recognizes the text (in the picture just taken), and then you can email that text to yourself (or anyone else really). So now you do not have to scribble down that paragraph of text or that page from a city directory. Just (1) start ImageToText, (2) Take a picture, (3) Send an email. What comes to your mailbox is NOT the image but OCR’ed (OCR is optical character recognition) text in the body of the email message. I like that a lot.

LDS Films Online …

I have mentioned this a couple of times before. It was a concept that was coming. It came. OK I tried it, but I could not use the first implementation because they could NOT return a list of MY Family History Centers (why would I want to order a microfilm that was only for other states, i. e. UT). Ok ,they have finally fixed their problems and I can now report that My Account is working. So go to familysearch.org/film  and create an account, set it up and start ordering microfilm.

https://www.familysearch.org/films/customer/account/ - Keep this handy (Bookmark it / Make it a Favorite). This is the link to your Microfilm/Account Dashboard.

read more »

September 24, 2011

Stanczyk – Internet Muse #Blog #Enhancements #genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Recently, I have been pondering how to improve this blog. So I have implemented a few things and I pray you will let me know your kind thoughts.  Thanks

Changes

Here are the list of changes I have made today. Let me know if you think there are others that would be beneficial.

  1. Emails to me are easier. Just click on the pic [here in this post] or permanently on right sidebar.
  2. RSS subscriptions are more obvious – top right of the blog
  3. Access to other Pages moved up
  4. Thank You. – At the bottom (and here and now) I thank you for visiting me
  5. Previously I added my  twitter feeds – mostly I announce new blogs posts, plus a few quips.
September 2, 2011

#Polish #Genealogy #Blog – Stanczyk Thanks His Visitors …

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Visitors Last 60 Days - Cumulative

About two months ago, on the 4th of July, Stanczyk decided to put a counter on the blog/website to see who you, my gentle readers are. Thank you for coming and for your emails — please keep them coming.

Since the blog is written in English, with a smattering of Polish, or Russian or even Latin, I suspected the English speaking world (US, CA, GB, AU) would be the majority. As you can see by the flags of the world and the numbers besides the flags,  representing yourselves, that is true.

Since much of the subject matter is Polish/Slavic genealogy based, then I was not surprised to find Poland my second largest country of interested viewers — Dziękuję bardzo . Indeed my thanks to all of the Central/Eastern Europeans from: PL, DE, RU, CZ, AT, UA, BY, LT and even HR — you know who you are.

I am pleased with Canada since many Polish genealogists or genealogists in general  who trace the Polonian diaspora came through Canada, as was the case in some of Stanczyk’s family tree. I am pleasantly surprised by the Nordic nations (SE, NO, DK), but of course there was much intermingling with the Polish peoples in a time long ago, including Mieszko I ‘s grandson Canute (aka Cnut the Great) who went on to great influence in the Nordic countries and finally in the United Kingdom itself.

As for the rest of the world, I am glad you came too. I thank you for your polite inquisitiveness.

I would urge all interested parties who blog, to use the Flag Counter — why not? I think the experiment was a success. I now know I am reaching my target audience (and a bit more besides) globally.

You can find the flag on the Map pages or the Dziennik Polski (Detroit, MI) pages. Click on the flags and it will take you the Flags Counter website where you can get your own.

Thanks for being a part of my experiment. For my part, I think I will keep it going to see how many Flags of the world I can collect or how many US states (32 so far) or Canadian provinces (5) I can wrangle in.

 

Your Host,

–Stanczyk

July 17, 2011

Pacanów – The Church and A Tip.

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

St. Martin - Pacanów Church about 1918

Stanczyk, writes about Pacanów and Biechów … a lot! These are my ancestral villages. I have never been there, but they are in my very bones.

Today’s picture is from the World War I era of Pacanow and its church area. Today Sw. Marcin is now a minor basilica. The church is such a part of Poland and its history. It is also a major part of its families’ histories. Without the Church, there would be very little in the way of genealogy. As you can see the image is from Poland’s National Digital Archive (NAC). Remember I wrote about these archives, right?

I write about these two parishes, each of which has many villages that comprise their individual parishes. My reason is simple. I am always in search of others whose family history is also from these two parishes.

I have had some success in seeking out these people. For example, I met a good friend Jacek (from Krakow) at a Polish Genealogy website: genealodzy.pl  . I also met the wonderful, Elzbiety (Heliasz nee) Kapusta. She spoke no English and I am NOT fluent in Polish, but armed with Google Translator and some determination, I made my way to NaszaKlasa.pl (a Polish Facebook social network website = “Our Classes/Classmates”). This wonderful woman was born in the Biechow parish where my grandparents(dziadkowie) were married ! She took it upon herslef to get the church record of their marriage and even a copy of the civil record too and mail these documents to me. Bless Her Always for that kindness — which I did not even ask her to do!

But that was an active search and it also led me to find a second cousin (whom I have never met face-to-face, who was born in Pacanow and now lives in TX). So active searches of Polish websites are a must, if you cannot actually visit Poland and its churches and/or archives. But this BLOG is an overt attempt to draw (i.e. a passive search) others related to me  or connected to these parishes to seek me out. So this is an inverted search process. Hence, all of the material on names of people or places in hopes that someone someday Googles my blog and contacts me. So that is my latest tip to Polish Genealogists — write a blog and post items on your family so distant cousins far and wide can reach you.

Coming Up …

In the next week or two, I will be writing about other research that I have collected on these two parishes including:

Historical Census of the Pacanow deaconate, Census of the Jewish Population in this area,  Church Archive holdings of Biechow / Ksizanice / Zborowek

Please join me. Blessings For Your Sunday!

Stanczyk

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