Archive for ‘Technology’

May 4, 2012

BIG Genealogy — #Genealogy, #FamilyTree, #GEDCOM

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

When Stanczyk, wrote the title, he was not referring to Ancestry.com or any other endeavor by genealogical companies from the western USA. No, Stanczyk is fascinated with numbers .. of people.

Yesterday, this jester wrote about the Confuscius Family Tree. It is commonly accepted to be the largest genealogy (family tree). But I had to wonder … Why?

It is an old genealogy, dating back to Confucius’ birth in 551 BCE. It is now 2012, so we have a genealogy that is 2,563 years old. My much beloved wife/kids are Jewish. In the Hebrew calendar we are presently in the year 5772. Despite my having been to a Jewish Genealogical Conference and meeting a man who told me his genealogy went back to King David. [This jester resisted the rude/snarky comment that if he researched using both Old & New Testaments he could push his research back to Adam.]

I also did not ask him to show me his documentation, but assuming he could, his genealogy would have been another 500 years earlier (~ 1050BCE) and therefore this tree mathematically speaking (assuming there are other Judeo-Christian couplings before I & my wife) his tree had the potential if you could/would follow all/many branches and not just the direct lineal trunk you have a tree with approximately 100 generations (adding another 17 generations to the 83 for Confucius). This assumes a generation is 30 years. Now if we look at Confucius and see 2560 years = 83 generations, we see an average of 30.84 years per generation — so 30 years per generation is not a bad estimate.

What genealogy could be older still? Well according to the Bible we record the Jewish peoples in Babylonia. So perhaps we can extend King David and/or one of his citizens back to King Hammurabi of Babylonia — that would yield another 650 years (~1700BCE) or about another 22 generations. Let me see if Confucius’ family tree is about 2 Million for 83 generations we get about 24,096 people per generation. So by adding 39 more generations then Hammurabi’s Family Tree should contain approximately another 940,000 people. So come on Iraq produce your family tree of nearly 3 Million people!

What genealogy could be older than that? There is a quote that goes something like, “History knows no time when the Egyptians were not highly developed both physically and intellectually.” True enough, recorded history does go back furthest in the Pharaohnic dynasties. That takes genealogy back to the first dynasty King (Pharoah) Menes, who sure enough had a son who wrote about Astronomy [source: Timechart History Of The World, ISBN 0-7607-6534-0 ]. That takes us to approximately, 3,000 BCE, another 1300 years/44 generations/1.06Million people! Ok, since there is no recorded history earlier than that, we will not have a properly sourced genealogy older than this. So people who are Elizabeth Shown Mills devotees turn your heads away …

What genealogy could possibly be older than that? I read that the indigenous peoples of Australia have an oral history of 48,000 generations! The aboriginal people of Australia date back to about 50,000 BCE, which would be 52,000 years ago/1734 generations/41.8Million people in their family tree. That’s not 48,000 generations, but that is more than twice as much as genealogy researchers test using their FAN24.ged file which has 24 completely full generations with 16.8Million pseudo people.

Now that is what I call BIG Genealogy. But where is that family tree (not FAN24.ged)? Why has no genealogy older than Confucius’ genealogy been found and carried forward to the present day? Is it possible that such a family tree exists?

–Email me!

Related Blog Articles …

Random Musings” (10-March-2010, see musing #2)

May 3, 2012

Greenland, China – Where Are You? — #Genealogy, #Blog, #Map

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The map you see is this blog’s reach since some time in February.

My hope with this blog is to reach Greenland and China (中国).

My blog is connected to Greenland in this one way…

My first cousin Stephen E. Eliasz (whom we always called “Butchy”) was stationed in Greenland. I remember my father’s comments about the pictures of his from Greenland — which from my dad’s comments I pictured as icy. True, enough the Thule Air Base is the US base closest to the North Pole. I hope there is another Polish genealogist in Greenland who searches/finds this blog. I am trying to fill in the above map with as many genealogists from all over the globe.

My only connection to China – who are avid genealogists is my fascination with GEDCOM and family trees. I used to think that if you were related to Genghis Khan (born circa 1162) then you would have the largest family tree, because he had a vast empire and many wives. However, time works its wonder in many ways. The people with the largest family trees are those related to Confucius (551-479 BC, the religous/philosopher founder).

The Confucius Genealogy, originally recorded by hand, was first printed in 1080 AD [80+ years before Genghis Khan's birth]. Now the latest compilation of which there is a Confucius Genealogy Compilation Committee that is responsible for collecting, collating and publishing the 2,500 years worth of genealogical data. According to a web post by Tamura Jones (2/17/2008),

Confucius family tree, last updated in 1930. Back then, the tree already had 560,000 members Today, it has more than 2 million. The longest lines in the tree span 83 generations.

Tamura’s article was written just before the last time the Confucius Genealogy published in September 24, 2009  (as a pre-announcement). That 2009 publishing was the first time, the Confucius Genealogy included female descendants. So I guess the extra 1,700 years of Confucius ( 孔子) trumps the extra wives that Genghis Khan had. That is my only connection to Chinese Genealogy (家谱).

Does anyone have more than 83 generations (with citations documenting your lineage)?

May 3, 2012

Genealogy Indexer – Logan Kleinwak — #Genealogy, #Historical, #Directories, #Military, #Yizkor

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

     Stanczyk’s prior article on Genealogy Indexer – the Logan Kleinwaks’ website that indexes historical city directories or other historical lists (i.e. Yizkor Books, Military Muster Lists, etc.) covered this amazing genealogical resource who deserves a much higher rating than #116 on the current Top 125 Genealogical Websites.

Since my first blog article about GenealogyIndexer.orgLogan Kleinwaks has added virtual keyboard (a software icon) for generating diacritical letters (think ogroneks and umlauts) as well as non Latin characters (think Hebrew or Cyrillic) to make searching easier. This jester even uses that excellent piece of coding to generate the text for articles or data entry into genealogy software. You may remember, I wrote about that in “Dying for Diacriticals” or any of the other dozen articles (some of which cover GenealogyIndexer).

Well in the last month Logan has really outdone himself in adding material to the website! I give up trying to keep up with the huge amounts of data he is publishing. You really need to follow Logan on twitter (@gindexer). Thank You Logan for your amazing efforts.

April 30, 2012

Genealogy Top 125 Websites (2012 2nd Qtr) Released ! — #Genealogy, #Website, #Rankings, #Metrics

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The Latest Top 125 GENEALOGY Websites are out !

Not surprisingly, all things Ancestry.com or owned by them are in the top 20.

The 1940 US Census that came out on April 2nd, had a profound impact on the rankings. Obviously any web site related to the 1940 US Census had a boost in their ranking (except Ancestry which was already number 1). Here are the Top 125 Genealogy Websites (or click the image) !

SteveMorse.org

SteveMorse.org, the One-Step Website that is a king of Swiss knife of genealogy actually dropped about 100K in the ranking and rising nine places on the list to become the 19th highest rated website ! This impressive improvement is related to the 1940 US Census, even though this is not one of the four websites with actual census pages.

Dr. Morse’s http://www.stevemorse.org/census/unified web page which helps you find the best Enumeration District (ED) to browse (until indexes are created) by utilizing an address or the 1930 ED to point you at the valid 1940 ED(s) that you should begin your search with.

Mocavo.com

Mocavo is the new genealogy search engine. You can think of this as a Google for genealogy web pages and databases. This is a fairly new launched service and was a big splash at this year’s RootsTech (2012). Mocavo too, was up nine places on the list and is now the 17th highest rated website.

Looking 4 Kin

This relatively unknown website jumped an astounding 38 spots (now #47) on the top 125 and this jester thought that kind of improvement had to be mentioned.

New Additions

Louis Kessler‘s two websites: BeholdGenealogy.com (#87) and GenealogySoftReviews.com (#74) were new additions. I also added Archives.com to the list because it was one of the four websites hosting the 1940 US Census images. So Archives.com cracked the list at #6. Well done! You may also recognize this website as the newest acquisition by Ancestry.com.

Stanczyk has had to give his own website a honorary spot, as my blog has dropped out of the top 125??? I am bit surprised, as last year when my popularity increased 4-fold I gained 5M in the ranking and had a nice #120 spot. In 2012, thanks to you my faithful readers, my popularity increased between 2.5-3-fold again. Surprisingly, I dropped 5M in my rankings and I had to remove my website from the top 125. Alexa.com are you sure?

This jester is sorely puzzled as my website stats are off the charts this year and I have already matched last year’s unique reader count and it is only the end of April! Another indicator that my readership is up 3-fold. However, I yield to the methodology and look forward to making the list next quarter.

April 2, 2012

Ancestry.com – 1940 US Census is Awesome … except can we have all 50 states, PLEASE?

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk,

 

     LOVES Ancestry.com version of the 1940 Census. The Image Viewer is fast, sleek, easy to use — aahh flawless.

My only request is to please get all 50 states ASAP!  I do not have any ancestors in:

DE, RI, NV, IN (or Panama Canal, American Samoa or Virgin Islands).

Oh, and please call  http://1940census.archives.gov and tell them how deploy Scalable, Well Architected, Web Apps, please.

March 24, 2012

1940 US Census – 9 Days Away — #Genealogy, #Preparation

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has finished his preparations for the 1940 US Census (sans index). After the index is finally transcribed, I will query widely for years. But for 2012, I needed to be able to search via the Enumeration District.

As I said before, I made extensive use of Drs:  Steve Morse & Joel Weintraub 1940 Census Tool .

I created a spreadsheet. I listed the most important people I wanted to find in 1940. I used the 1930 US Census and recorded their Enumerated District (ED). This is a necessary precursor to looking up the ED’s for 1940. The only other way is to start from a street address. Now use the link to the 1940 Census Tool [see above] to convert your 1930 EDs to 1940 EDs (or your last known address to 1940 EDs). I made sure that when I got a long list of possible 1940 EDs that I used their ED descriptions and the Google Map to highlight the most likely ED (or EDs) to start with.

I also used the Ancestry.com City Directories (Beta) to finalize my analysis. While doing that I got the idea to pose and hopefully to answer with the 1940 Census some questions. I noticed in a 1941 City Directory that one of my Gawlik/Gawlikowski families started using, Gawlick . In fact due to emails with another genealogist I was prepared to accept Gawlick for this family already.

Well there they were using Gawlick for their family name. There was also another detail in the city directory. It showed that Kath (the wife) was a widow (of Anthony) in 1941. OK, so now I had a boundary for the last possible year for Anthony Gawlick (aka Gawlik) as 1941. I tried to use Ancestry.com’s older city directories and I noticed that they were sparse (not all years) and also when they had a year, it was not always a complete scan of that city directory so my use of Historical City directories was hit or miss for some families and/or streets. But none the less, I was able to find Anthony alive in the 1939 city directory! Ok So now I had a short range: alive in 1939 … to dead in 1941. So maybe the 1940 will tell me is,  “Anthony alive or dead in 1940″? I added that question to my list of questions.

Questions

Will I find Rose Wlecial Gawlik’s brothers living with her? Why have I had such a hard time locating her borthers (Boleslaw & Leon) in city directories? Is Anthony Gawlick alive or dead? Is my grandmother’s older half-brother Frank Leszczynski still alive in 1940 (he declared his intent to be a US Citizen in 1931)? He’d be about 75 years old in 1940. I wonder what age he use (70 or 75) since I have multiple birth years for him? Also, I learned in my preparations that he used a younger half-brother’s address in 1931. So I wonder is Frank Leszczynski living with Michael Leszczynski in Buffalo/Depew at 257 Broadway in the 1940 Census? Until I had access to historical city directories, I had never realized that Michael and Frank had both lived at the same address — nobody ever mentioned that in any interview or email.

So beyond the facts that the US Census will provide about who is where and how old they are and whether they are US citizens or not, I am hoping to see what the older men were veterans of which US conflicts. The questions related to the Great Depression will also be interesting for all and will certainly be relevant to the political discourse of today — particularly as we march onward to the November elections.

Most of my immigrant Eliasz (aka Elijasz) forebears are deceased before 1940. My grandfather (Joseph) died in 1930 and my grand-uncle (John) died in 1936. So only Mary Eliasz Gronek can be found. Will I get any clues about Detroit Stanley Elyasz (a 1st cousin of my grandfather) and how about Buffalo Stanley Eliasz (is he a cousin or a sibling of my grandfather)?

The suspense and the anticipation is growing. Good thing we had WDYTYA last night and tomorrow night we will get the first episode of Henry Louis Gate’s genealogy show on PBS. Those can help ease the suspense for now until a week from Monday.

How are you preparing? Are you done yet? Are you doing something similar to what I am doing? This is what I am using (email me please) …

March 21, 2012

Almost Wordless Wednesday – iPhone Organization for Genealogy — #Mobile, #Technology, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Here’s what I am doing with Mobil Tech …

Home Screen

Social Media & Media

Genealogy Page

There’s still 4 more screens  that I’ll spare you from …

On the Genealogy page, notice that  I added Dr Stephen Morse’s One-Step Website to my “home screen” as if it were an app.

I did likewise, for the web page: Yet Another Calendar Calculator.

What do you do with your iOS device?

–Stanczyk

P.S. 

If you follow my blog, you must see the constant churn on my iPhone as my software tools change the way I work.

March 20, 2012

Finding Your Roots, With Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Premiers ! — #Genealogy, #Popular, #Media

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

We have already have had a few episodes of “Who Do You Thin You Are?” on NBC — a couple of really good ones too. This Sunday (March 25, 2012) on PBS will air the start of their 10 part series, “Finding Your Roots, With Henry Louis Gates, Jr.“. So we can watch Helen Hunt on Friday and then on Sunday night we can learn about the roots of Cory Booker & John Lewis.

This series has already made a startling announcement related to comedian Wanda Sykes. In the NYT, article “Family Tree’s Starting Roots” we are told that, “The bottom line is that Wanda Sykes has the longest continuously documented family tree of any African-American we have ever researched, ” said Mr. Gates. The Wanda Sykes episode will air in May — mark that one down now!

I read the New York times article (see prior link, twice) and was startled by Wanda Syke’s family tree — a new twist again on African American genealogy (there is a fascinating reason why her roots are so well documented).


Scan Pages App

I was so motivated that I used the NYT newspaper article to demonstrate a new App on the iPhone (yes its free), called Scan Pages. I had previously download another Ricoh App, ImageToText (which OCRs an iPhone image and emails you the OCR’ed text) –which I had occaision to use during the RootsTech 2012 conference. The Scan Pages App is not an OCR application. It does create images (B/W are much better than color) that can be mailed in JPG of PDF format. It cleans up the images (in terms of straightening or de-skewing) and emails them to you. I did the newspaper’s article of Wanda Sykes in PDF. I also did a Scan Pages black-white image of a 1905 directory of Catholic Churches in Detroit . If you compare the two PDF documents, it is clear the cleaned-up B-W (1905 Churches) beats the color (Wanda Sykes).

Later on this week, I am going to try using the App, PDF Splicer, to put together in one PDF document the two emails of the two page article on Wanda Sykes. I also have two pages of that 1905 Church Directory so I will also try combining those two PDFs as well in PDF Splicer.

Mobility Genealogy is a fast-paced niche. Keep tuned in here for ideas to use in your research.

–Stanczyk


March 18, 2012

Dziennik Polski Detroit Newspaper Database App Search Page

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk,

was finally able to use his training from Steve Morse’s presentation at RootsTech 2012 to create a One-Step Search App for the Dziennik Polski Detroit Newspaper Database.

To search on 30,920 Polish Vital Record Events, just go to the new Dziennik Polski Detroit Newspaper Database App Search page (on the right, under PAGES,  for future reference).

FAQ

For more background on the Dziennik Polski Detroit Newspaper click on the link.

You can search on the following fields:

Last Name – exact means the full last name exactly as you typed it. You can also select the ‘starts with’ radio button and just provide the first few starting characters. Do not use any wild card characters!

First Name – exact means the full first name exactly as you typed it. You can also select the ‘starts with’ radio button and just provide the first few starting characters. Do not use any wild card characters!

Newspaper Date – exact means that you need to enter the full date. Dates are of the format:

06/01/1924 (for June 1st, 1924). Format is MM/DD/YYYY. Leading zeros are required for a match.

You can use ‘contains’ radio button to enter a partial date. The most useful partial is just to provide the Year (YYYY). Do not use any wild card characters!

Event Type – exact means the full event type. This is not recommended. You SHOULD select the ‘starts with’ radio button and just provide the first few starting characters. Do not use any wild card characters! Uppercase is not required.

Valid Events Types: BIRTH,  CONSULAR,  DEATH,  or MARRIAGE

Indexer – exact means the full indexer exactly as you typed it. You can also select the ‘starts with’ radio button and just provide the first few starting characters. Do not use any wild card characters!

The Indexer is meant to be informational only, but you could conceivably want to search on this field too, so it is provided.

March 17, 2012

1940 US Census – 16 Days Away — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk apologizes for being away for a few days. I have spent some of that time preparing for the 1940 US Census (sans index).

So I made extensive use of Drs:  Steve Morse & Joel Weintraub 1940 Census Tool .

I created a spreadsheet. I listed the most important people I wanted to find in 1940. I used the 1930 US Census and recorded their Enumerated District (ED). This is a necessary precursor to looking up the ED’s for 1940. The only other way is to start from a street address. Now use the link to the 1940 Census Tool [see above] to convert your 1930 EDs to 1940 EDs (or your last known address to 1940 EDs).

How are you preparing? This is what I used …

March 12, 2012

ScribeFire – Blog Software / Chrome Browser Extension — #Technology, #Blog

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

     Stanczyk likes genealogy and Stanczyk loves technology. Hence why I had to go to RootsTech 2012. You are reading a blog article that I have created in ScribeFire 4.1 . Actually, I have been dabbling with ScribeFire, since I saw it mentioned by WordPress.

     It gives me a greater control over my fonts — somthing I have been missing, without getting my hands dirty with CSS/Styles. I have resisted doing too much HTML coding of my blog — I just want to muse and not have to do a lot of bit-fiddling to get my thoughts down on … uh CRT glass (or whatever glass you have on your mobile device).

Besides fonts and font sizes, superscripts, subscripts, it also gives me a convenient table tool and it will also  seek out related links for my article too (using Zemanata — see below) !



Related articles, courtesy of Zemanta:

So I recommend adding this extension to your browser if you use Chrome. I have gone back forth. I write some in ScribeFire and perhaps finish the article in WordPress (or vice versa). ScribeFire and WordPress,  both play well together and I get the best of both worlds. If you need these features, then get ScribeFire from the Chrome Store today .
March 12, 2012

Ancestry.com Fixed My GEDCOM Export !!!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is happy once again !

The folks at Ancestry.com fixed my GEDCOM Export. It was about 10-14 days, but at least the job got done and my ability to export my research is back to normal.

The timing of the infinitely spinning icon could not have been worse. I had just imported a great deal of photos and I continued to do so even with the export problem. But all is well that ends well. So I did one more export (and it worked) to get myself to a valid checkpoint of my work.

Whew! What a relief. I did not want to have to once again re-enter my multimedia. Nor was I previously aware that I would also have lost my valued contributors too. Who knows if their emails have changed since I invited them???

At any rate, thank you Ancestry.com for fixing my GEDCOM Export!

March 10, 2012

Ancestry.com Broken ? Is Your GEDCOM Export OK? — #Genealogy, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, wants to know if anyone else is having problems Exporting their GEDCOM from Ancestry.com?


 This is what I see when I try to export my gedcom from the tree settings screen. It never gets past 0% complete.

I have tried to submit a Help Ticket for technical support and so far I have not received any response. What gives Ancestry?

I can still work on my tree and updates appear to be saved. I can synch to the Ancestry App (on the iPhone) and the changes are there too. 

March 9, 2012

WordPress Blogs Now Have Stats By Country!

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

WordPress - Views By Country

Most Recent Flag Counter

   Stanczyk, for a long time has been using Flag Counter to get some idea of the access my blog has to the Old World.

The image to the far left is WordPress and is just for today (so far). The image to the near left is a cumulative count by country of Flag Counter for the last year. So I am thankful to WordPress for providing this analytic for my blog. It was always my hope to reach Poland and the other Central European nations where potential family tree members still reside. When I look at the analytics for the last year from WordPress, it seems people from about 60-70% of world’s landmass visit this blog! Come on China, you can bring that percentage up.

Thanks WordPress!

– Stańczyk kocha Polskę!

March 7, 2012

Wordless Wednesday – Diacritcals/Cyrillic Glyphs On Your iPhone? — #Mobile, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Here’s what I do …

Diacriticals Under The E

Russian/Cyrillic Keyboard

On the left (above), press & hold down a key like: a, e, o, c, l, n, s, -or-  z, …
On the left (below) is an Internation Keyboard for Russian/Cyrillic characters …

Do you enter diacriticals in your Family Tree?

–Stanczyk

March 4, 2012

To Tweet or Not To Tweet … That is the Question

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Pardon the Bard in me. But I had to soliloquy.

To tweet or not to tweet — that is the question! Whether it is nobler to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous Ads or by opposing end them.

Stanczyk™ knew this would happen. First the IPO then the looting of your privacy and the deluge of adverts that must accomplish a $100 Billion justification of Twitter’s existence. I was frustrated by sponsored tweets spamming my tweet stream already … it just Zucks! There are better ways to monetize the website that are far less intrusive.     Zuckerberg call me!

Now we find Twitter wants to sell our tweets too??? Isn’t that our IP (Intellectual Property)?  Do I need to put a © [copyright] on my tweets — Now I am down to 139 characters to be a content provider. I expect royalties for my copyrighted tweets — please sign the licensing agreement Mr Zuckerberg before you sell mine. This is your only legal notice! … ©™®  [Date: 3/4/12]

Let’s Go To Google+

Oh, didn’t Google just change its privacy rules? I am sure they will do NO evil. Let’s see if this jester can summarize their new privacy statement briefly …. Hmmmm …

“You have no privacy if you use any of our software.”

That pretty much summarizes  the non-Evil gobbledygook. I’m here from Google and I am here to help you.    Damn you: Larry Page, Sergey Brin, and Eric Schmidt  (Google’s founders and Executive Chairman). Now we have to dump our search history and … everything else. Did everyone dump their search history by the March 1st deadline? Do not criticize Google’s efforts or our robo spiders will leave you in the dusty cobwebs of isolated Internet ignominy  (go use Bing you miscreants).

When did Silicon Valley become such lecherous corporate Privaphiles? Is their software so bug free they can GUARANTEE nobody will be harmed by their intrusiveness; Nobody will be slammed for their Internet address; Nobody will be crossmerged incorrectly with other similar named nefarious netizens ?

Time will tell whether we live happily ever after … or not. Right now its just … “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark”.

March 3, 2012

Library of Congress – Chronicling America — #Genealogy, #Newspapers

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is a Library of Congress (LOC) researcher. Mostly, I have done my research in the Madison building where they keep the Newspapers / Periodicals.

Today they (LOC) sent me an email announcing another 100+ newspapers digitized with another 550,000+ new digitzed pages available via their Chronicling America – Historical Newspaper program. I have written about this worthy program before. Whether you research history or genealogy, these newspapers can be of help and providing evidence or even just adding a context to your ancestors.

Did you know that the LOC has over 220 Polish language newspapers on microfilm (and/or digitized)? To help out the Polish Genealogists, I have  compiled and published a list of the LOC’s Polish Language Newspapers:  here .

Make newspapers a part of your research to fill the gaps or to provide context!

–Stanczyk

March 3, 2012

Google’s Chrome Browser For Genealogy — #Genealogy, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

     Stanczyk was a big Mozilla/Firefox browser user. On Mac or Windows it did not matter. So it was a shock that I switched to Chrome (Google’s browser).

I did so mostly on Google’s promise that “microdata” would be another widget that would greatly enhance the search experience for genealogy data. I waiting on that feature — still am waiting.

On Tuesday I mentioned Virtual Keyboard 1.45, for entering your diacriticals through your browser into say Ancestry.com. Today, I was reading Kathy Judge Nemaric’s blog – “Dead Reckoning” [nice name for a genealogy blog] and she mentioned an extension to the Chrome Browser. It is called Ancestry Family Search Extension 2.4 .

     Open up a new Tab (Ctrl-T works) and click on Chrome Web Store. In the “Search Store” field, type in “Ancestry Family Search” and press the Enter key to bring up the extension (see on the left).

Click on the Add to Chrome button and then click on the Install button in the dialog box that pops up to confirm your wish. Once you have installed the extensions into your Chrome browser, it will show like the following screen:

Now you are ready to reap the rewards of that hard work. Go to Ancestry.com and perhaps open up your family tree on an individual you are working on. Now your browser’s address bar has a new  “widget”. Next to the STAR widget you have been using to Bookmark pages is a new widget shaped like a TREE.

See the red circle (and arrow)? Just click on that and it will bring up a new window on top the current TAB in your browser with (in my case) Tomasz Leszczynski result set from the Family Search databases. If you click on one result, then a new TAB will open to the exact record in Family Search.

This is a very nice synergy between the two websites. So I am thinking, that if Google produces their microdata widget, that 2012 will be the year of the widget in Genealogy and perhaps the year of the CHROME browser too.

There is one microdata Schema Explorer browser extension already in the Chrome Web Store. But you will want to wait for Google’s which will use the website: http://historical-data.org/ . I am guessing Google will use this website to develop schemas to guide its browser.

2012 is shaping up to be a very good year for genealogy and to switch to CHROME!

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