Archive for ‘Genealogy’

July 14, 2013

A Bit of Blog Bigos … #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy since the 4th of July! So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my blog.

bigos_huntersstewA bit of bigos (recipe) !!

Let me point out that in June the Polish Archive completed their latest update on: ♥ http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/ .

Unfortunately, it did not include anything from the old wojewodztwo: Kielce (now in SwietoKrzyskie). See the image of the drop down menu below (not full listing but to give you an idea on what is in and how that is somewhat limited for researchers like Stanczyk. I hope another phase will commence soon!

 

SzukajArchiwum_June

Meanwhile on:

♥  genealodzy.pl - They added the death records from 1875-1908 for Pacanow parish to their Geneszukach database. Previously they had added the Birth and Marriage records. These are transcription / indexes, not actual church record images such as you find in their Metryki database.

Still I have found dozens of Eliasz (and … Gawlik, Gronek, Hajek, Kedzierski, Leszczynski, Major, Paluch, Wlecial, Zasucha, etc.) that I was previously unaware of. Now I will need to get the actual images in order to make sense of these indexes and the new people in order to add them to the family tree.

Enjoy the bigos. Smaczne (delicious)!

June 2, 2013

Polish Vital Records On-line — A Survey #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Metryka_Urodzenia_Births

Stanczyk is a bit uncertain. It seems like every day there are some new vital records indexes or even actual register scans themselves made available from congregations all over the Central European — Jewish, Catholic (Roman & Greek), Orthodox, Lutheran/Evangelical lands that make up Poland or a land that was once within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the 1st Republic) or any of the variations between those times. So I thought I would step back and take stock of what was available. Yes, I know this will be out of date by tomorrow. But here is a quick & dirty, handy reference list of where to go looking. Clip & Save.

Cut— — — — — — — — — —

Poland – Archives & Genealogical Societies

AGAD Księgi metrykalne – Eastern Borderlands (Ukraine, Russia Jewish Pale, etc.) —

http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/testy.html

(scans by Sygn.: http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/KMLw301.html#idp1765776 )

Prussian Poland Parishes

BASIA - http://www.basia.famula.pl/en/ - State Archives in Poznan, the Wielkopolska Genealogical Society (WTG “Gniazdo”) project.

Poznan Marriage Project - http://poznan-project.psnc.pl/

Pomorskie Towarzstwo Genealogiczne - http://www.ptg.gda.pl/

All Poland & Eastern Borders (PTG)

GeneSzukacz  / Geneteka (indexes, some scans) –  http://www.geneszukacz.genealodzy.pl/      &      http://geneteka.genealodzy.pl/

METRYKI (parish register scans)– http://metryki.genealodzy.pl/

Szukajwarchiwach (Poland’s National Archives online) - http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/

This is the latest project and is shooting to have 5.8 Million records by the end June (this month) scanned and on-line by Polish Archive or National Museum.

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) – http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

The venerable project with new life provides indexes to registered users (free) and then you can purchase the actual church record. Great for Jewish Pale & Russian Poland, plus so much more.

Metryk.GenBaza.pl - http://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,list,4,1 (AP GRODZISK). Archive in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Russian Poland parishes near Warsaw).

Family Search.Org 

Besides the 5 parishes below, you might want to have a look at holdings for:

Austria, Germany, Russia & Ukraine

Poland, Częstochowa Roman Catholic Church Books, 1873-1948 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Gliwice Roman Catholic Church Books, 1599-1976 Browse Images 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Lublin Roman Catholic Church Books, 1784-1964 99,510 14 Feb 2013
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 18,916 21 Apr 2013
Poland, Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books, 1612-1900 1,002,155 6 Jan 2012

Did I miss any? Email Me … Proszę !

Other (Inne)

http://regestry.lubgens.eu/news.php - from Valerie Warunek (PGSM). Database of Indexed church records (birth/urodzenia, marriage/malzenstwa,  death/zgony) from Lubelskie wojewodztwo. No scans (skans), but it does have record (akt) #’s.

May 29, 2013

Wordless Wednesday — Philadelphia 1913

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PhilaEmigrantStation

Dateline — Philadelphia’s Ellis Island 1913  Emigration to Philadelphia peaked in 1913. Good thing for this jester, as my aunt Alice (Aleksandra) and my Busia (grandmother) arrived September 15th, 1913.

100 years later her grandson is here! Full circle.  Eliasz in America.

Ship Arrivals

15 – September – 1913 - Prinz Adalbert

Philadelphia Inquirer 9/15/1913 - Ship Arrivals

Philadelphia Inquirer 9/15/1913 – Ship Arrivals

Ship Manifest

PrinzAdalbert_19130915

May 23, 2013

Who Do You Think You Are — @TLC

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Every genealogist I know watches #WDYTYA . So for all our sakes, I am glad that the @LisaKudrow Program was picked up for a 4th season; This time on @TLC starting 23-July-2013.

Genealogy Subjects:

Chelsea Handler,    Kelly Clarkson,        Zooey Deschanel,

Cindy Crawford,    Christina Applegate,   Chris O’Donnell, plus two more ?

May 19, 2013

Genealodzy.pl – Geneszukacz Database, Pacanow 1875-1908 — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Pacanow

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealodzy_plOn http://genealodzy.pl/  Stanczyk  saw that they have an updated GENESZUKACZ database.

My ancestral village, PACANOW, was indexed for BIRTHS (1875-1908). I was able to verify it was correct with my grandfather (whose Birth Record I have) and a few others. I also found some I did not know about !!!   I only wish they had the images (like in METRYKI database). Thank you: Wojciech Liśkiewicz (who I think was the indexer)!

Later in the day they(he) also added MARRIAGES(1875-1908) too.

BIRTHS

MARRIAGES

See Also:

Domagala, Hajek, Kedzierski, Odomski, Paluch, Poniewierski, Siwiec, Wlecial, Wojtys, Zasucha, Zdziebko, Zwolski

May 12, 2013

♥ Happy Mothers Day ♥ — #Genealogy, #German, #Croatia, #Vespek

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

VespekVendelin_Birth18581108_SarvasCroatia_GGrandfather

Stanczyk, was not intending to write a blog post today. I hope Genealogy Moms are having a wonderful day today  … too.

Yesterday, I was researching on FamilySearch.org. On a lark, I thought I would look at Croatia. In particular at Tenje. I did that because my maternal grandmother, Roza Göttler (aka Gottler/Goettler/Gettler). From her ship manifest, I knew her to come from Tenje (which was Austria-Hungary, then Jugoslavia, now presently Croatia). This explains the ever changing ethnicity throughout the US Federal Censuses. I did indeed find Gottlers in Tenje. I did not find my grandmother’s parents or my grandmother … unfortunately the years available online would not meet my needs. But something unusual happened. I found other affiliated family names: Eisenbeiser and Elter. So I am now convinced that Tenje (the Roman Catholic records) is where I will find my maternal grandmother.

That was so uplifting, on a lark, I thought I’d search for my maternal grandfather’s village. His was a bit of a problem too. Differing country names (like Roza Gottler), but his village name changed often too, so even though I had ship manifest, Declaration of Intent, and finally a Petition for Naturalization, I was still uncertain where he was from. I was pretty sure he was from the same area as Roza Gottler. My paternal grandparents were both married once, before they married each other and had my mother. So my grandfather emmigrated alone and my grandmother emmigrated with her first husband (John Reiner). Over the years, I developed many clues which I collected even though they did not fit together. This weekend, the clues came together! These stray clues allowed me to verify that the records I was viewing were my own family. What a gift on Mother’s Day weekend. I found both of her family parents’ families  this weekend!

It turns out that my grandfather was born in Sarvas (now in Croatia) and in the same district as Tenje. So all those sources: Sawas is from Ship Manifest , then  Storvish is from Declaration of Intent, and  Dowash is from the Petition for Naturalization. The first Vespek birth record I found spelled the village as Starvas. These are all the same place! Some were slightly misspelled. Now I can see it. So in the same FamilySearch project in two different villages I found my maternal lines. Some direct lines, some indirect branches, others are affiliated families.

So I have set a fairly high level of confidence in these findings. As such, I believe I have found my Great-Grandfather Vendelin Vespek’s birth record. This is not 100% certain and I have to find 1 or 2 missing pieces to make it a 100% certain. For those who are second (or 3rd) cousins researching in the Vespek family tree pay attention to the remainder and download the image at the top.

NOTES:

Croatia, Church Books, 1516-1949 Roman Catholic (Rimokatolička crkva), Sarvas

Corresponding LDS MF #’s1739003 Items 4-5,  1739004 Items 1-7

Sarvaš Births (Rođeni) 1847-1865  [for Vespek, Kasper, Kantner, Fechtig, Emert, Platz, Zorn]

URL: FamilySearch Sarvas, Croatia  [image 66 of 298]

Birth 8th / Baptism 9th – November – 1858

Vendelin son of Vendelin Vespek & Catherine Kaschper (aka Kasper)
born in Sarvas, House #43

Godparents:  Tobias Jobst & Joanna Kreines

See Also …

Tenje (Osijek) – FamilySearch.org [for Gottler, Eisenbeiser, Elter]

URL:  Tenje

P.S.

Even though most of the records are in Latin, there are still records in Croatian.So for my Polish genealogy researchers, I would hasten a tip. As I was doing this I saw month names that were close to month names for Polish. Croatian is a Slavic language (albeit Southern Slav). So when I saw LISTOPAD (Croatian), I was immediately thinking NOVEMBER (in English), because LISTOPAD in Polish = November in English. But in Croatian, LISTOPAD = October. Surprise!

From Google Translator:

January, February, …, December – (English)

Sijecanj, Veljaca, Ozujak, Travanj,  Svibanj, Lipanj, Srpanj, Kolovoz, Rujan, Listopad, Studeni, Prosinca – (Croatian)

April 30, 2013

Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952 — #Genealogy, #Michigan

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, was overjoyed at the announcement of the newest FamilySearch.org database:

Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952

The URL / Link is:  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1968532 [bookmark it]

FamilySearch_MIDeathCerts_1921_1952

They just published it 29 April 2013 [after some issues were discussed]. No your eyes are not playing tricks, the FamilySearch.org website has had a makeover recently. It may be a unsettling if you have not visited the site in a while, but persevere, it is worth it.

Hurry and grab your dead relatives in case any controversy causes this database to disappear!

 

April 28, 2013

Another Leszczynski Branch in Koprzywnica ???

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

On  24 March 2013, I wrote about Gazetteers … and showed an index map of the Polish War Institute.

To follow along, visit … P46_S33_SANDOMIERZ map to see where Koprzywnica town is and its parish(es). Koprzywnica is near enough to my ancestral villages to merit an interest.

On 11 April 2011, in Ancestry.com, there was posting in the genealogy forums on a thread that I had participated related to the LESZCZYNSKI magnate family (and specifically King Stanislaw Leszczynski). This woman said that her family had a family lore about being related to King Stanislaw. Since this jester has that folklore in my family that has been echoed by 2nd/3rd cousins who also have Leszczynski blood,  I thought I might investigate her (Ms. Rice) ancestors to see if there were any overlap with my own. Also since Koprzywnica was near enough  that this could be a branch my LESZCZYNSKICH, I was off on another tangent.

I started with an Ignatz Leszczynski (the grandfather of Ms. Rice ??) who also happened to live Philadelphia (nice synergy with Stanczyk), because his bride happened to be a Sadowski (Leokadya Sadowski). So I found this Ignatz (Philadelphia) Leszczynski’s ship manifest and he was from Koprzywnica and was coming from his mother Zuzanna (a fairly uncommon Polish name).

On a lark, I said let me see if PTG’s website, genealodzy.pl has any data in their GENESZUKACZ or METRYK project databases for an Ignacy (i.e. Ignatz) Leszczynski from KOPRZYWNICA. Well they did and the year was a close match to the ship manifest. Well GENRSZUKACZ gave me the Akt# (Record #) and the year in KOPRZYWNICA, so I asked if the METRYK project had any image of that record … AND it did! Little Ignacy, was b. 1883 in Akt# 32 and his parents were:

WALENTY LESZCZYNSKI b. about 1849 given his age in 1883 &

ZUZANNA z. GAWRONSKI

Well that was some strong circumstantial evidence that I had found the correct parents for IGNACY LESZCZYNSKI of  KOPRZYWNICA. The year match was good match to ship manifest and the mother was named Zuzanna, a match,  and the birth parish matched the ship manifest.

IgnacyLeszczynski_1883Birth_WalentyZuzanna_32

Ignacy’s record is on the left page (na lewo)

Ignacy’s Church Record (#32) in 1883 also had a marginalia that was significant. It had Ignacy’s death date: 9th-November-1963 (Akt#57) in KOPRZYWNICA. So it appears that Ignacy moved back to Poland (before 1963). Also for those who tracing LESZCZYNSKI genealogy, I have outlined in a red box what LESZCZYNSKI looks like in CYRILLIC handwriting. I also red-underlined the Leszczynski name of the father so you would be sure that this is indeed a LESZCZYNSKI record.

It turns out that METRYK had the marriage record image form Walenty Leszczynski & Zuzanna Gawronski in 1876 (Akt #22) in Koprzywnica too. So now I had a Piotr Leszczynski as father of Walenty (Franciszka Bogunski was the mother). I found Walenty’s birth in 1849 (Akt# 26). From Piotr’s age it appears he was born about 1795. I did find a Teodora Leszczynska, daughter of Piotr Leszczynski & Franciszka Bogunska being born in 1835 (Akt #143). That was how I knew Piotr had a birth year about 1795. I could not find Piotr & Franciszka’s marriage record, so perhaps they were married elsewhere. I also did not find any other children of Piotr & Franciszka (other than Teodora & Walenty).

WalentyLeszczynski_ZuzannaGawronski_1876Marriage_22

Walenty Leszczynski marries Zuzanna Gawronski in 1876 (Akt #22)

OK, so Stanczyk has found another Leszczynski family (albeit a common name). It is close enough that Piotr Leszczynski (father of Walenty, grandfather of Ignacy) could possibly be a father or an uncle of my great-grandfather Tomasz Leszczynski — but I am still a LONG ways away from ever proving that. My only saving grace is that Leszczynski in that neck of the woods, is not so common a family name. Right now, it is only a dream or a hope. But, I wanted to throw it out there and see if I get any hits from other genealogists. Email me!

April 28, 2013

Tsarnaev Genealogy — #Genealogy, #Russian

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Did you read Stanczyk’s blog from yesterday commenting on the AP Breaking News of the Russian Secret Service having tapes of Zubeidat and Tamerlan Tsarnaev (Царнаев) discussing jihad. I believe the Russians also indicated they had tape of the mother speaking to other person of interest to the FBI also. So go read yesterday’s blog then come back …[I'll wait for you]

TsarnaevSchoolRegister_2001

Tsarnaev / Tsarnaeva – Lines 9,10,11,12

Perhaps you may have missed a link from yesterday on the fine work by Business Insider. They are a fine source of news for what happens in Europe, for those who want yet another viewpoint on which to be informed. You should click on that link (also here) if you wish to see pictures of the family before they came to the US. After I had read that I thought I would write a blog on the school register, which seems to confirm the children (only four, although I have read another account of a fifth child, an unnamed  married daughter in Chechnya). Alas, the AP Breaking News story over ran my composing a story of a school register. But here it is, albeit belatedly …

Line 9 - Bela Tsarnaeva, born 1988, female, Chechen, Arrived In School 2001, 7th grade, from Kyrgyzstan

Line 10 - Alina Tsarnaeva, born 1990, female, Chechen/Avar, Arrived In School 2001, 5th grade, from Kyrgyzstan

Line 11 - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, n/a, male, Chechen, Arrived In School 2001, 1st grade, from Kyrgyzstan

Line 12 - Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 1986, male, Chechen, Arrived In School 2001, 8th grade, from Kyrgyzstan

The handwriting is in Cyrillic. So if you are trying to learn to read Russian, here is a modern version (much easier than old church registers in Old Russian characters/handwriting) — albeit still difficult for Latin Alphabet readers to discern.

So all children entered the Dagestan school system in 2001. They all came from Kyrgyzstan. We now have credible ages for the daughters and confirmation on their names (Bela/Bella, Alina/Ailina).

It is interesting that one daughter (Alina) had a notation of Chechen/Avar. Her mother was an Avar. Previously, all children were listed as being born in Kyrgyzstan. Why does this one child have Avar by ethnicity? Aren’t all of the Tsarnaevich children Chechen/Avar really — since they all have the same mother.

Even though Dzhokhar’s birth was not given, we know his birthdate from other documents (see also the first story) which indicates: 22-July-1993.

So for those genealogists following the genealogy, those are the best birth dates (or birthyears)  so far that I have seen in news accounts. This data is also from a good source document, not just someone’s notes (or memory). Genealogy in the news.

 

April 25, 2013

The Last Pandemic … 1918 — #Genealogy, #Polish, #War

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Block_A week ago Stanczyk wrote about Cholera and its 5th Pandemic. This week I was searching for ‘Status Animarum‘ (Latin for ‘State of the Souls’). That is a type of church census. Often these censuses include three generations. I stopped in a list of Google results. I stopped for Cleveland’s St. Stanislaus’ 1918 Status Animarum.

Now Stanczyk has a branch of the family in Cleveland and at the St Stanislaus parish. 1918 was the tail end of World War I. It was also the main year of the last epidemic,  … the flu,  sometime called the Spanish Flu. More people died from the flu than from the war. Pestilence won again. I am sure war had something to do with the pestilence and people weakened immune systems.

World War I was different then almost all other wars in US history. We had citizens training and fighting in two armies against a common enemy. You had Polish-Americans serving in the US Army and you had Polish Americans serving in the French colors (Blue Army), Polish-led (General Haller), Canadian-trained, with men from the USA who were Polish ethnically. So a world war and pestilence both ran amok.

This Status Animarum was not the kind like in European parishes that listed two-three family generations and their home, census-like. This was a Status Animarum Report — summarized at the parish level …

1918_Cleveland_StStanislaus_pg1 1918_Cleveland_StStanislaus_pg2

Blessedly, with about one thousand men serving in the military (3/4 USA, 1/4 Polish) and the Flu Pandemic, only 18 men had died!

  1.8%  

Statistically, Cleveland’s St. Stanislaus had lucked out. The other statistic, 25% of the men served in Haller’s Army (aka the Blue Army). This device allowed the US men to have a presence in the World War, before the USA was ready … emotionally to end its isolationism and enter the war itself. I wonder if this percentage held true in all Polish parishes in the USA?

What desperate times were those? And yet, is today not like a hundred years ago? We shall see. It has been nearly a century since the last pandemic. Will the Chinese bird-flu be the next pandemic? Time will tell. Certainly, there is plenty of warfare about the globe and plenty of sabre rattling.

April 23, 2013

FamilySearch Indexing: They Reached A Billion

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

FamilySearch Indexing reached their first billion records online. Congratulations FamilySearch!

logo.gif FamilySearch Indexing: Thanks A Billionopen.aspx?ffcb10-fe561074726701757613-fde81c797d6506787c167670-fe6315707166057a711d-fe5a17707266007a701d-fe2c13767767017b761770-ffcf14&d=10026

Thanks A Billion

The winners
Thank you for contributing to the billion! We did it! We reached a major milestone of one billion records indexed and arbitrated since the launch of FamilySearch indexing in September of 2006. We are grateful for the many volunteers who dedicate their time and efforts to make these records freely available for online research. Languages

Deutsch Italiano
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BillionsBadge_EN.pngKenneth B. (California, United States), Brittney S. (Idaho, United States), and April R. (Alberta, Canada) were the lucky ones to index and arbitrate the billionth record! They will receive a FamilySearch backpack stuffed with FamilySearch goodies. We also want to thank all the volunteers who have contributed to the billion records with a FamilySearch indexing badge. You can download your free badge at https://familysearch.org/node/2113.

It took us seven years to reach the first billion. How long do you think it will take us to reach the next billion? The advances of technology and the dedication of our volunteers have increased the speed in which we can process and deliver records for publication. Join the global effort to make the next billion records available for family history research. Start indexing now! familysearch.org/indexing

Sincerely,

FamilySearch indexing

FamilySearch.org is the largest free collection of online resources for family history research. With billions of historical records, powerful search tools, family trees, and an active community, FamilySearch.org helps everyone discover, preserve, and share their family history.You received this message because you are a registered volunteer with FamilySearch indexing, signed up to receive e-mails, or received this as a forward. The original was sent to mike.

If you have questions, comments, or concerns, please contact FamilySearch at support.

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I have been an intermittent contributor to this and other genealogy indexing projects. Doing RAOGK helps others and because of the interconnectedness of our family trees, it may ultimately help our own families. Congratulations again to FamilySearch!

April 17, 2013

The Fifth (5th) Cholera Epidemic [1881-1896] — #Genealogy, #History, #Morbus, #WordlessWednesday

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Another Wordless Wednesday blog post. (Hmmm… somewhat wordless).

1892 Cholera Epidemic  … Russian Empire lost > 250,000 people (note the red boxes)…

Newspaper / Book Clippings:

1892 September Cholera Newspapers

Sources:


Google Books - The Cholera Epidemic of 1892 in the Russian Empire: With Notes Upon

Fulton History - Mount Vernon NY Daily Argus September 27th, 1892

Trove Digitised Newspapers - Brisbane Courier September 14th, 1892

April 16, 2013

From Pacanow Poland to Birchgrove, New South Wales, Australia — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Immigration

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk always loves finding something unusual or unexpected. I guess that is just my eternal boyish wonder of finding/unearthing a treasure. Immigration or the diaspora of Polish citizens about the globe holds a fascination for me. It is a difficult puzzle to solve for your own ancestors. So if I unexpectedly find something else in an unexpected place for another Polish genealogist then I feel compelled to post it in my blog.

PiotrowskiJozef_ofPacanowPoland_AuCitizenshipDeclarationDateline – 22 September, 1954 – Birchgrove, New South Wales, Australia. As a fluke while researching some cholera pandemics, I decided to see if there was any news in this Historical Australian Newspaper website from the Biechow/Pacanow area. To my wonder, I spied a hidden jewel in these far away shores. Up popped, an “advertisement”. Shoot, I was hoping for something historical, not something mercantile. Oh well, lets just see what these Aussies have about Pacanow, shall we?

What did I find? No it was not for me (although it is an affiliated family, so who knows). Click on the image if you wish to follow along … (transcription follows):

I, JOZEF PIOTROWSKI, born in Pacanow, Poland, resident 5 years in Australia, now residing at 39 Wharf Rd. Birchgrove. N.S.W.. Intend to apply for Naturalisation under the Nationality and Citzenship[sic] Act, 1948-1953.

Well, Well, an affiliated family member from my ancestral village (Pacanow) declaring his intention to become a citizen of Australia (NSW=New South Wales state) post World War II.

Source: Trove Digitised Newspapers – The Sydney Morning Herald (22 September 1954)

April 14, 2013

A Church Register Novelty in Koprzywnica — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Poland_1807_1815_AnnotatedIn another case of finding something interesting whilst researching something else, I found a type of Church Register Index that I have not seen before in any other parish. So today’s blog is about that novel index I found. See the Church Register in the picture (see below).

Dateline Koprzywnica parish, 1810 – In what was after the 3rd partition was Austrian-Hungarian territory (Austrian-Poland in green), has now been annexed by Napoleon in 1809 into the Duchy of Warsaw and in another five years will be Congress Poland (Vistulaland, Russian-Poland). But in 1810 we are speaking of Koprzywnica in the powiat of Staszow and the Departement of Radom. No, that is not wojewodztwo — it is the French, Departement that is the highest level of administration in the Duchy of Warsaw. The map shows that a huge swath of green from the  Austrian-Poland partition (zabior) was annexed into the Duchy in 1809. Stanczyk’s own ancestors once again switched Empires from Austria to France. So too did the citizens of Koprzywnica (and a great many cities, towns, and villages). Poof, now the records go from Latin, in the perfunctory Latin Box (Table) Format to the lingua franca of Polish paragraph with French-style two witnesses.

So Koprzywnica, like Stanczyk’s own ancestral Villages (Biechów and Pacanów) was briefly Austrian, then French (very briefly), then Russian until 1917-1918 whence it became just Poland again. We can find Koprzywnica in the gazetteer, Skorowidz Miejscowoscy Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej as being in the powiat Sandomierz, wojewowdztwo Kielce (circa 1920′s/1930′s).

Indexes are so very helpful. It is always a let down when a parish book or a year within the book lacks any kind of index. That means I will have to look at each and every record to see if any are related to me / my research. Early Latin paragraph form church records often do not have any index  – they barely denote the year change. So that means you have to read each and every badly handwritten paragraph of Latin — very rare to find a priest with good Latin handwriting. That is why the Latin Box Format was more welcome. At least I could find the pieces of info and the handwriting was less of an issue. But the Latin Box format did not have indexes either.

So it was helpful when Napoleon implemented the Codex Napoleon in the Duchy of Warsaw. So by 1810 you see the records written in Polish (lingua franca) in a paragraph form that is specified by the Codex Napoleon. And these new records have indexes!

OK, the indexes initially are by letter: A, B, C, …, Z. So you have just under 26 pages of indexes. It is an improvement. Quickly the church realizes it can save paper by running the index all together with all letters on a single (or a few) page(s) in order alphabetically. Very efficient to scan these indexes for your families. And it was also easy to spot when a priest added a late addition to the index at the back after all other names (even though it was evidently in the wrong spot lexicographically speaking).

OK 1868-1918, we find Russian / Cyrillic indexes. In addition to priests not knowing Russian well and ordering names phonetically before later on,  we find the index in Cyrillic proper lexical order you will have to scan carefully. Cyrillic kind of forces that to those of us weaned on a Latin alphabet. But you sometimes find the Russian indexes sorted in Cyrillic lexical order … by the first name ??? That is not very useful. Sometimes the index is in chronological order (akt # / record # order) making it barely more useful then scanning every record.

But when we find a well formed index (or a not so good index) it is always for one event: Birth/Christening, Marriage / Marriage Banns, Death Records. One index for Births, one for Marriages and one for Deaths … assuming none are missing, 3 indexes. That is what makes the following index so very interesting …

The Index (Skorowidz)

1810KoprzywnicaINDEX_pg4_JewishNames_righthalf This was supposed to be a Marriage Index !! But it was five scanned pages! This would have to be an extraordinarily large city to have that many marriages! What are all of those columns ?? That is what I asked myself.

Let’s see what those columns are:  Record # (Akt #), Village Name, Person Name(s), Births (Urodzin), Deaths (Zeyscie), Banns (Zapowiedz), and finally Marriages(Malzenstwa) Kart # (you can safely ignore). This index is an all event index. Births-Deaths-Banns-Marriages all interleaved. In fact, when I look at each event (B/M/D) I see the same 99 event-record pages and the same five index pages. It appears that all events are in the same register! This is rather unique — as I said previously I have not seen this before in other parish registers I have seen.

So in this “combo style” index (which needs a proper name) you cannot have a single name  for marriage record, so marriage records have two names (as usual), but this requires two lines in this style of index — since we are multi-columnar. We also see that Banns are indicated ‘I‘ or ‘II‘ — the third bann being the actual marriage itself. The Roman numeral written above the word Zapowiedz. So since the index is in Akt# order, it is a chronological order too. It could be interesting from a demographic perspective (what time of year do most marriages occur or  do a higher concentration of deaths occur in winter months). If this style index had occurred during an epidemic year, then we could have seen all of the deaths occurring in a great streak without interruption by other events. 1810 in Koprzywnica was not such an epidemic year.

There is one more fascinating aspect to this index. In the Napoleonic era (1807 thru 1829) we find that Catholic priest acts as the civil administrator and that Jewish/Evangelic/Orthodox vital records are written in the Catholic register. How is this noted in the index — which again I have not seen elsewhere? Look at the scanned register image for this blog. Pay attention to Records #’s:

85, 86, and 91.

It so happens that each of these records is a Marriage Banns event type. But, notice that each begins ‘Zyda‘.  Żyd = Jew, hence Żyda is plural for Jews. Żydów = Jewish. This indicates that this is a Jewish civil record being recorded.  Now I know that Jewish vital records are recorded in the Napoleonic era Catholic registers. But it is unusual that it is indicated in the index (as opposed to being in the record itself).

So this was a very fascinating find after all. I was actually looking for a particular Leszczyński but I found a novel index and indeed a novel parish register overall.

Related Posts

The Fourth Partition (23 January 2013) – A Discussion of the Duchy of Warsaw, with a map

Historical Eras of Poland (21 January 2013) – A set of Stanczyk defined eras of Poland of particular use to genealogists. An historical definition of Poland’s eras (1569-present) based upon history’s impact on genealogical research.

 

Post Scriptum

The index from this column was found in the Polish website: genealodzy.pl (PTG) of which I written many times before. Their METRYK project of scanned church books is where I found the 1810 Koprzywnica Index.

April 11, 2013

Just Another Mt. Olivet Map, Section 15N — #Genealogy, #Cemetery, #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has previously published a map (or two) of Mt. Olivet, Detroit cemetery showing the various sections. Today, I am continuing the Mount Olivet meme to publish all of the section maps I have.

Section 15  (North part)

Section 15 - N

Sampling of Names:

332 – Buczkowski

443 – Orzel

553 – Rozanski

595 – Katolski – Koswicki

623 – Wroblewski

724 – Morawska

Let me hasten to add that Stanczyk is NOT related to the above name samples. You need to follow the link to Mt Elliott cemetery association for more info.

April 9, 2013

Just Another Mt. Olivet Map – Detroit Cemetery — #Genealogy, #Cemetery, #Maps

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has previously published a map of Mt. Olivet, (Mount Olivet) Detroit cemetery showing the various sections. Today, I am continuing a meme to publish all of the section maps of Mount Olivet, that I have. Eventually, I will build a database of the names for searching.

Section 15 (South-part)

Section 15 - S

Mount Olivet (Detroit) – Section 15 (South)

Sampling of Names:

1547 – Jazdzyk

1544 – Gayeski

1267 – Zwicki

1263 – Warczak, Jablonski, Brzozowski

1208 – PRUSINSKI

846 – Kedrowski

Let me hasten to add that Stanczyk is NOT related to the above name samples (except I may now have to look at the PRUSINSKI in 1208). You need to follow the link to Mt Elliott cemetery association for more info.

Next:  15 North

April 5, 2013

AP Kielce, An Inventory of the National Archive in Kielce, Poland — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

APKielce

From a forum at genealodzy.pl  Stanczyk saw a PDF document mentioned. When I looked at it, I saw it was an inventory (in progress) of the holdings of  the National Archive in Kielce (AP w Kielcach). So I have produced a condensed version of their work-in-progress. Yes, most of these are related to Stanczyk’s family tree. For their complete inventory list (which was 424 items), see the link (URL) at the bottom of this table.

Now I mention this particular AP (National Archive) because it is the archive that covers the Russian-Poland partition that my ancestors were from. There may be other inventories for other archives.

AP KIELCE

 # Nr zespołu – # Rec. Group Stan na dzień (as of) 2013-02-01 Nazwa daty skrajne – date range księgi – books metry ilość sfotografowanych ksiąg – number of books photographed ilość zrobionych zdjęć – number of photos taken Braki – deficiencies
1 388 Beszowa 1875-1911 54 71 58 3770 oddział Sandomierz
2 341 Biechów 1875-1908 55 0.83 55 2 538
3 146 Kazimierza Wielka 112 1.03
4 353 Oleśnica 1875-1911 61 0.97 69 3 506
5 812 Opatów 1825,1890-1906 14 0.39 11 2369 oddział Sandomierz
6 152 Opatów 120 1.31
7 658 Opatów-gr 1834-1836 4 0.04 4 36 oddział Sandomierz
8 44 Opatów-moj 1831-1910 46 0.95 47 6860 oddział Sandomierz
9 814 Opatów-pr 1896-1915 19 0.23 20 573 oddział Sandomierz
10 871 Ożarów 1890-1910 3 0.06 4 445 oddział Sandomierz
11 45 Ożarów-moj 1826-1909 43 0.61 43 3419 oddział Sandomierz
12 355 Pacanów 1875-1908 62 0.91 64 3 703
13 373 Pacanów moj 51 0.76
14 245 Połaniec 1810-1910 106 2.05 106 12507 oddział Sandomierz
15 252 Połaniec-moj 1826-1910 88 0.99 92 3425 oddział Sandomierz
16 246 Staszów 1810-1910 103 1.65 103 10146 oddział Sandomierz
17 253 Staszów-moj 1826-1910 84 1.33 86 6236 oddział Sandomierz
18 362 Stopnica 48 0.88
19 374 Stopnica moj 46 1.29
20 582 Stopnica pr 3 0.02
21 97 Tumlin 189 1.67
22 370 Zborówek 1875-1908 58 0.66 65 2 295

Source: http://s6.genealodzy.pl/pliki/asc/apkielce.pdf

I tried to provide a reasonable translation (using Google Translator with some hand-tweaks) of the Polish Column Headings in English.

LEGEND (3rd Column):

A suffix of moj or -moj indicates Jewish records.

pr – Orthodox Catholic

ew – Evangelical

gr – Greek Orthodox

The rest (or any with  rk) would indicate Roman Catholic.

I believe the Column Heading METRY indicates the actual shelf space of storage this record group physically occupies. I believe the units would be in Meters (m). Remember Europe uses ‘,’ where America uses a decimal point. Some appear to be missing the decimal point. In most cases, it appears that Excel has translated the comma to decimal point, but if you look at the source document, you should be aware of this cultural difference.

April 4, 2013

Archiwum Państwowe w Suwałkach in Szukajwarchiwach.PL — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Over the last few weeks we have been discussing about Szukajwarchiwach.pl, the Polish website for “searching in archives” of the 2.4 Million Archive Images of historical vital records. So today we will look at the Suwalki Archive (Archive #63,  http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/63#tabZasoby), in particular the WIZAJNY parish in which this jester has previously plumbed (for NARKIEWICZ / SZCZESNY).

WizajnySuwalki

First off, please take note of the two red circles in the image. The first red circle around the drop down menu is set to ’15′ by default. I usually choose the drop down value ’100′. This drop down menu controls how many ‘Units’ are displayed on each page.  So in order to minimize the number of pages and to maximize the number of items on each page, I routinely pick the ’100′ from the drop down on each page.

Second, I was searching for WIZAJNY parish, But what I got/found was WIZAJNACH. You need to learn to recognize the root of the proper names/nouns in Polish. Fred Hoffman/Jonathan Shea call this applying the “chopping block” to get to the root of a word. So in the second red circle we find Wizajnach. That is the unit we wish to search.

Now notice the last column shows ’5124′ (on 3 April 2013). This number is the number of “sheets” that have been scanned. So you should think images. The concept to take away is that if you see a ZERO, then there is nothing scanned; Try again later.  But in our case we should expect 5,124 images were scanned across the year range:  1808-1905.

If you want to follow along, I picked the year 1822 which 86 scanned images and selected ’100′ scanned images from the drop down which effectively shows all 86 scans one page. These 86 images are actually “thumbnail” images that you click on to see …

Wizany1822Births

At the bottom of the image are two circles/icons. The ‘Z’ circle gives you a kind of magnifying glass for seeing a small part of the image, zoomed-in.

It is the other icon that we wish to click on (the square with the arrows at each corner, left of the ‘Z’). This icon left of the ‘Z’ pops up a window of the image more full sized. This full-sized image can be interacted with, zooming or panning or dragging the image around the viewing window. Please, note that at the bottom of this pop-up viewer window is a link you can click on to ‘Download‘ the scanned image to your hard-drive. So when you find your ancestor, you can download his/her scanned vital record.

Before I bring this post to a close. I wanted to point out how you can find the indexes (usually after the last record). This era of the 1820′s, the indexes are usually alphabetical with one letter per index page. So these kind of indexes look as shown below. You need to find the ‘Akt #’ in the index and then go to the scan that has the image of this Akt. The Akt #’s are on the outside of each image. They are on the left for the left-hand page and on the right for the right-hand page in the image scans.

IndexPages

As I mentioned in a prior blog article, the Wizajny parish is amazingly complete. It was also interesting because its records switch over in mid-year 1868. So you can see the records in Polish in early 1868, then in Russian starting in mid 1868. There are no Wizajny or even Suwalki records in genealodzy.pl (Metryk or Geneszukach) databases.

JEWISH GENEALOGISTS

Zydow

Please note that in the Napoleonic era (about 1807-1829), the Catholic parishes in Poland  were required to record the vital records for all faiths. So you will find Jewish birth / marriage / death records in the Catholic parishes books, if there were Jewish families in that area. For example, Akt #39 appears to be a Jewish birth record. Usually that is indicated in the text, but I did not see in Akt #39, BUT … if you look to the right of the record at the image on the left  (you will see a ‘Zydow’ column with a ’1′ in it) …

Prior Related Stanczyk Articles …

A Guide for Using Szukajwarchiwach.PL Poradnik

Polish State Archives – Numbers

Russian Poland 1867-1875

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