Archive for ‘Data’

August 25, 2014

Genealogy Consanguinity & DNA — #Genealogy #DNA #Kinship

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Genealogy_Consanguinity
Consanguinity Chart Now … by John J. Tierney used via CC rights

 This is a beautiful data visualization tool of “relatedness” (Consanguinity) between yourself and an ancestor/descendant. Stanczyk loves good #STEM.  Mr. Tierney modified his excellent chart to add, “What percentage of DNA do you share with your family members”.

Kinship is characterized by the sharing of a common ancestor(s).  Consanguinity is derived from its Latin root:   consanguineous ∴  “of common blood”.

Today, I wanted to use this excellent chart to talk about the three types of Genealogical DNA tests:

 mtDNA

Y-DNA

autosomal DNA

mtDNA / Y-DNA

This way a genealogist can determine for him/her-self what benefit each type of DNA testing offers. mtDNA is for tracing the matrilineal line (your mother/maternal side). Y-Chromosome is for tracing your patrilineal line (aka surname tracing) or your father’s side. These two dnas are for tracing direct descent as these sex-based chromosomes are copied identically from one generation to the next, not half/half as the autosomal dna chromosome’s dna. Correctly, said the mutations in mtDNA and Y-DNA are more infrequent than the non-sex based genome (i.e. autosome) and they are not mixed like the other 22 chromosome’s dna. If you follow the blue arrows (in the diagram) up/down your family tree that is your linear descent; so you mtDNA to trace your mother’s side and use YDNA to trace your father’s side to your proverbial mitochondrial-Eve or your Y-Adam. You are testing for the blue boxes in our diagram.

So what is autosomal DNA?

Genealogy_Consanguinity_dna1

Inside Red Lines – are autosomal DNA generations.

The autosomal DNA are the dna from the other 22 non-sex chromosomes pairs. Autosomal DNA testing is a genealogical DNA test that uses either autosomal STRs or autosomal SNPs. (STR’s are Short Tandem Repeats; SNPs are single-nucleotide polymorphisms.) However, testing companies do not currently offer autosomal STRs tests that use enough STR markers for genealogy. The preferred choice for both genealogy and ethnic population matching is microarray chips that use hundreds of thousands of autosomal SNPs.

Mathematically, speaking you need at least six generations back before you get enough certainty(99% certainty) to do matching to find distant cousins by using current Genealogical DNA testing. So if you do not have your 4x-great-grandparents’ (all 64 of them) surnames then you are NOT guaranteed to be able to use current DNA tests to determine your relatedness to another genealogist (and his/her ancestors who must also have six generations in their tree too).

I am thinking we are still one or two generations (35-70 years) away from using this as a viable technique that will work with any two random genealogists — mathematically speaking. Obvious exceptions are Icelandiks or Amish or other relatively closed-genetic populations who may have greater success (or counter-intuitively lesser) with fewer generations. Its all in the DNA and in the quality of the testing to catch the diversity in your genome.

You will notice that the fine chart we have been using, including the one with the red-lines (my lines) that indicate autosomal DNA testing candidates, does NOT show enough generations. It would need to be extended one more generation. So we need the surnames of 64 people with whom we only share 1.5675% of our DNA with. That is with direct descent. If we are matching to the autosome DNA  (i.e. our Nth cousin, M-times removed) then we are matching to someone who we may only share 0.0243% blood with. That is 2/100th of 1 percent !

Related Blog Article

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p style=”text-align:justify;”>Violinist’s Thumb24-January-2014 – This has many great links to other articles and includes some pertinent facts on DNA to think about. A Guaranteed thought provoker of a blog.

July 18, 2014

Family Search – An Inventory of Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk,  frequently has written about the online inventories where the Kielce Gubernia/Wojewodztwo parish records, scanned images or indexes  exist. I have written about Geneteka, GenBaza, etc. But did you know that Family Search also has some?

Buried within:

You can find the list of parishes at:  Family Search (Kielce) 

At present we find parishes have some online scans:

 


 

July 3, 2014

Kielce Parishes On-line in SzukajWArchiwach — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Archive

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Previously, Stanczyk has written about what is available online for the former Gubernia (or Województwo) Kielce. In this article I am listing the SzukajWArchiwach.pl parishes online with year ranges and scan image counts. Please notice that links are provided for you to go directly to those you are interested in or you can go to the list of all parishes available (since as you know an article like this becomes out of date periodically).

 

Poland’s Archives (Kielce) Parish Year Range Scans #
21/1700/0 Brzegach 1810-1912  5,652
21/1701/0 Chomentowie 1810-1939  5,997
21/1702/0 Ciernie 1810-1907  5,717
21/1703/0 Imielnie 1810-1912  9,680
21/1704/0 Jędrzejowie 1812-1911  18,045
21/1705/0 Korytnicy 1810-1912  -
21/1706/0 Kozłowie 1811-1913  5,795
21/1707/0 Krzcięcicach 1810-1912  9,569
21/1708/0 Łukowej 1811-1909  4,732

Parishes (Parafia):  Brzegach,  Chomentowie,  Ciernie,  Imielnie,  Jędrzejowie,  Korytnicy,  Kozłowie,  Krzcięcicach,  Łukowej

Cut and Save— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

July 2, 2014

Death Certificates & Death Certificates — #Genealogy, #DeathCertificates

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk knows that genealogy is only as good as your sources. The less sourced your family tree, the less the quality of the research. Death is final! It is also well known that death documents are the least reliable as the informant is often incorrect or misinformed and that misinformation is transmitted to authorities. So newbie genealogists be forewarned.

Stanczyk has had a career (outside of being a jester) as a computer professional and more specifically, an expert in data (gathering, organizing, loading, managing and analyzing data). As a consultant, we have this little aphorism, “A man with a watch ALWAYS knows what time it is. And a man with two watches is never sure what time it is.”  What does this mean? It means data/info is often in conflict and that one or both of those watches is inaccurate. One watch at least, but maybe both are wrong if they disagree with each other.  Genealogy has this problem.

A few days ago, this jester was delighted to discover that Family Search provides a Photo Duplication Service for its databases that are index only — no images uploaded, just the transcribed index. What a boon that has been for me. I was finally able to locate a death certificate for a first-cousin-twice-removed (or my paternal grandfather’s first cousin if you prefer). I was thrilled, I now knew factually his father’s name and that the Polish Church record of his birth was for this individual in the USA that spelled his name like, ‘ELYASZ’. Polish/Slavic genealogists must deal with many factors in name corruption or name change. So I confirmed that this man in Detroit, was my grandfather’s cousin. I confirmed his death and his burial at Mt. Olivet in Detroit. I also confirmed that he was married and that his wife/widow was Lorraine Kraft Elyasz (the informant of the death certificate). But let me pause the story there.

A few years ago, when I visited Michigan, I went to the county seat of Macomb County, Michigan (Mt Clemens). So I made a research visit to the clerk of courts. My primary goal was to get death certificates for people in my life I had known, but lacked their death certificates: mother, grandmother, aunt were the primary goals — success. But I wanted my grand-uncle John (aka Jan) Eliasz who had the bad sense to die in 1936 instead of the modern post-World War II era. I did locate his death date and they had to mail me that death certificate because it was off-site due to its age. No online data for those death certificates (pre-1960). So here is what I received in the mail …

19360717_EliaszJohn_DeathCertExtract

Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

I knew the document was an extract. Just by the format of the death certificate. I was crest-fallen, extracted data is often error-prone and this was a death document the least reliable so that is a double-whammy! Later on, I found out that the age of my grand-uncle was wrong when I located his birth record from the church in Pacanow. So I knew that the age in years,months,days was just plain wrong.  Obviously, the spelling of the name was incorrect (Elias [sic] vs. Eliasz/Elijasz) and the ‘recording date’ led me to believe that this extraction was from a death return (similar to a marriage return)  which is again a further generation removed from a death certificate. Can you just imagine the error propagation rate?

So emboldened by my photo duplication success of Stanley Elyasz, I decided to order the photo duplication for John Elias too. I was hoping that maybe, just maybe they had the image of the actual death certificate. Do you know what I got back yesterday?

19360717_EliasJohn_ClintonTwp_DeathCert

Actual Death Certificate of John Elias [sic]

 So, bless Family Search for producing a copy of the actual death certificate. Not much in conflict with the “extracted” form. But look at all of the extra info available:  Informant name/address, cemetery where buried, years in occupation, last year worked 1930 (6 years out of work during the Great Depression),  name of wife (Margaret ??? actually Pelagia), years lived in town of death (9 years => 1927 residence North Gratiot Ave, in Clinton Township), years in the USA (3o years => arrived 1906, I can only substantiate since 1910 which would be 26 years). Ok some of the extra information was also wrong, including birth date as I mentioned above.

So what did Stanley Elyasz’s death certificate look like  …

19231023_Detroit_ElyaszStanleyM_DeathCert

Stanley M. Elyasz

Interestingly enough both of these two gentlemen, who were first cousins also lived together in Detroit in 1921 at the 6410 Van Dyke Ave, Detroit, Wayne, MI [same as Stanley’s death certificate address]. I assume John moved from that address when his cousin died in 1923.

While sources may conflict isn’t it better to have them than not? Also, do not assume that there is only one Death Certificate. See above for my two death certificates for my grand-uncle John Elias [sic]. While they were not in conflict with each other, the second one was the much preferred one to have; I am glad I did not stop at the first one – in genealogy there are death certificates and then there are death certificates – they may not agree. Finally, bless my grand-aunt Mary Eliasz Gronek, but boy was she an error propagator. On my grand-father’s death certificate, she was NOT the informant (my grandmother was). But apparently after the fact, my grand-aunt submitted an affidavit and changed my grandfather’s birthdate. Unfortunately, she changed it from the correct date to a terribly wrong date. For years I had to keep three dates for my grandfather’s birth until I finally located his birth record in Pacanow. Then you learn what is truth and who are the good sources (or bad sources) of family information.

June 29, 2014

FamilySearch.org — Photoduplication Services — #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

RequestSubmitted

Did you know that you can submit a request to Family Search for Photo Duplication service of one of their indexed databases for a found indexed record?

Stanczyk did not know either. Then I read: “How to order an indexed document from Family Search” by Selma Blackmon .  At any rate, you can follow her steps to submit a request. I was able to utilize the info she wrote and submit a request (I am waiting for my emailed document, but I will update my readers when I get the result). Now you only get an email with an attachment of the image for the indexed record, which you request.

I’ll save you a few steps by putting the link below (so you do not have to search for it)

 

Requirements:

  1. You need an account [they are free].  Go to FamilySearc.org and click on “Join For Free” to register.
  2. After you have registered and you login to your new account, go to: https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Photoduplication_Services
  3. Lookup your indexed record. In Stanczyk’s case I chose the database: “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,”
  4. Notice that is only an index without any images. So I wanted to order the image of the death certificate I was interested in.
  5. I searched on “Elyasz” to get the info for Stanley M. Elyasz in order to submit the request
  6. I read the instruction from the above Photoduplication Services web page.
  7. I clicked on the green button, “Photoduplication Request Form”
  8. I filled in ALL fields with the info from the index result page of Stanley M. Elyasz and used that info
  9. Click on Submit

If you filled in ALL fields then you get the result I did in the picture at the top of this article. But you must fill in all fields or it will sit there as if it ignored your request — sadly no error message indicated I needed to fill in ALL fields.

The cost for an email of the document:  $0.00.  Most genealogists have an account to search the online images in the many databases that Family Search has published. But if not, then this Photoduplication Service should give you the impetus to register for an account.

PRICELESS! Thank you Family Search.org for providing this valuable service and Selma Blackmon for writing about it.


 

Returned Image [1-JULY-2014] from Submitted Request:

19231023_Detroit_ElyaszStanleyM_DeathCert

June 21, 2014

Is RootsWeb Dead? — #Genealogy, #Cloud

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

MyCloudStanczyk is wondering … “Is Rootsweb dead”? Please give me date and place of death if that is the case. Earlier in the week Ancestry.com had a multi-day outage due to a DDoS.  That is  a distributed denial of service, whereby a ‘botnet  make an overwhelming number of requests from a website until it crashes or ceases to be able to respond to requests.

So since Ancestry, hosts Rootsweb, I was thinking perhaps that DDoS took out Rootsweb too. I tweeted  @Ancestry and asked if anyone was working on Rootsweb being down and did not receive any response — so I am blogging in hopes that Ancestry.com will respond. Now I know parts of Ancestry came back a little at a time. Searching, then trees, the blog, finally message boards (connected to Rootsweb n’est c’est pas?). How many days now has Rootsweb been down and when will Ancestry get around to fixing the problem. Mundia is also down and perhaps Ancestry will never bring Mundia back, since they had already announced  (June 12th, 2014) that it  was going away. Likewise for MyCanvas and also Genealogy.com are dead too and they were scheduled for termination too.

This is a Cloud problem. When you live upon someone else’s cloud and it crashes you are down too and you do not come back until their cloud is reconstituted. I guess in this case maybe longer. Maybe you remember the news when in 2012 Amazon’s cloud crashed and that cloud crash took out Netflix, Instagram, Pinterest, and even GitHub (a nod to my Developers guild) or the when Amazon’s  cloud crashed in 2011 taking out FourSquare and Reddit.

My advice is from the Rolling Stones in 1965:  http://youtu.be/pq3YdpB6N9M [enjoy]. Mick Jagger was way ahead of his time.

 

 

May 27, 2014

Pieszczochowicz — An Affiliated Family to LESZCZYŃSKI — #Genealogy, #Polish, #SNA

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Pieszczochowicz_Moikrewny

Pieszczochowicz – 20 people in Poland

Stanczyk is working out a rather difficult piece of analysis. This jester uses Social Network Analysis (#SNA)  to assert a familial relationship or connection. It is labor intensive / data intensive process. Prior analyses have been very excellent at predicting valuable lines of research that have led to many further finds.

The moikrewni.pl tool for mapping names (shown in the image above) — shows that Pieszczochowicz is a rather rare name and only exists for some 20 people. The locales, I cannot draw conclusions from, but the numbers say that most if not all PIESZCZOCHOWICZ are closely related by its scarcity. So the name Pieszczochowicz enters my family tree in the following way:

Leon Pieszczochowicz (b. 7-NOV-1865 in Górek, Strożyska, Kielce Gubernia, Poland), son of Konstanty Pieszczochowicz & Maryanna Rzepała. Leon married Jozefa Leszczyńska (b. about 1861 in Biechów, Kielce Gubernia, Poland), daughter of Tomasz Leszczyński & Julianna Kordos. I am sur ethey many children, but I only know of one child: Edward Pieszczochowicz. Now, Edward, comes to the USA from his father Leon in 1910 (who was living in Busko) to his uncle Jan Pieszczochowicz in West Seneca, NJ. Edward, continues onto to Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. He will move on to Lackawanna, Erie County, NY in later life. But while in Toledo, he becomes the God Father of my own uncle: Stephen Edward Eliasz (son of Joseph Eliasz & Waleriya Leszczynska) at St Anthony’s Church on Nebraska Ave.  in Toledo, OH in 1916. Edward Pieszczochowicz’s own God Parents were: Wladyslaw Fras (husband of Agnieszka Leszczynska)  & Antonina Leszczyńska (probably nee Sieradzka, married to Jan Leszczyński). So what we see from this one affiliated family is what I considered a very highly connected value to my LESZCZYNSKi research and even so far as to connect my own ELIASZ line as well. We also see the FRAS (aka FRASS) affiliated family and the I believe the SIERADZKI affiliated family.

When I first captured Edward Pieszczochowicz at the birth/baptism of my uncle Steve, I had no idea who Edward was and had thought him a family friend [not a family member]. So you see over the span of time the collected data and SNA analysis of other data can connect disparate data points and prove  out relativity.

Let me end today’s blog article, by returning to the fact that since PIESZCZOCHOWICZ is rather rare, that I am now seeking out Jan Pieszczochowicz and two others: Boleslaw & Stanley Pieszczochowicz (these two also show up in Toledo, OH at  3224 Maple Street).  Will this family lead me to my LESZCZYNSKI roots? Time will tell.

 

May 24, 2014

Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie (an update) — #Genealogy, #Polish, #Kielce, #Gubernia

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Last year (December 13th, 2013), Stanczyk wrote about an “Online Inventory of ŚwiętoKrzyskie “(or old Kielce Gubernia) Parish Books. It was produced from a Polish website: http://www.ksiegi-parafialne.pl . That was before I could go through its collected data. It appears some of their info was inaccurate / misleading about whether there was an online database at the links they mentioned. It was certainly before GenBaza.pl was loaded with some regional Polish Archives data and it lacked any mention of the Polish Archives themselves: http://szukajwarchiwach.pl .

 

Today’s blog is a three page posting, or rather a re-posting of a Facebook posting I made in Polish Genealogy Facebook page. This is just the GenBaza data for old Gubernia: Kielce/Kieleckie. This is a long read — hence the read “More …” breaks.

May 22, 2014

Genealogy Websites Mash-up — #Genealogy, #Military, #Church

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

About two years ago Stanczyk wrote about a website, special because it was a Polish-German joint effort at Reconciliation.  The website I am referring to is: http://www.straty.pl/index.php/szukaj-w-bazie — Which takes you to a database search page where you can search for, “Victims of Oppression“.  It for searching for victims of World War II inside Poland.  Originally, I kind of ignored it because I did not have family who was sent to  a  Concentration Camp nor did any of mine get forced relation after the war. So I  MISTAKENLY thought this database was not for me. Last week I learned a few things.

Today’s blog is about the Mash-up of  Geneteka database,  Using Straty.pl (the above database of oppression) and a website of Concentration Camps, with a smidgeon of Genbaza.pl thrown in for good measure.

Here is my Mash-Up …

Straty.pl I went to straty.pl (use above link, for Polish) or paste the above link into Google’s Translator (for English). I put ‘Elijasz’ into the field named “Nazwisko” (Surname) and clicked on the button “Szukaj” (Search). It returned four results for me:

Straty Results - Four Elijasz

Notice the third row, with Stanislaw Elijasz, whose “Miejsce urodzenie” (birth place) was Pacanów. When I clicked on the button with the number “3”.  Remember his birthdate: 1906-04-17 ; We will use this data in Geneteka to get the Akt # and in GenBaza.pl to get the image of the birth record. When I clicked on the number “3” button, I got a lot more info:

Straty Details Stanislaw Elijasz

I immediately, understood my mistake. The oppression database returned data about my ancestor, Stanislaw Elijasz who was a soldier in the Polish Army when World War II started (1-SEP-1939). He is listed as a victim of the September 1939 Campaign, he was caught, in “Russland” [I presume they mean in the Russian Occupied territory as opposed to the German Occupied Poland.], he was the equivalent of a Lance Corporal in a Signal Corps Battalion. At any rate, he was interred in POW Camp (the 1st of three) on September 17, 1939. Imagine that, he spent the entire World War II as a prisoner of war.

The other details were vague and not clear to me from the data. Lucky for me in Facebook, I have a friend, named Jozef Taran (in Poland). He provided me a website for concentration camps:

Small_2http://www.moosburg.org/info/stalag/laglist.html#generalgouvernement

This second mash-up link was website of German Stalags (Concentration Camps) in Poland, Ukraine and Western Russia. This website and wikipedia pages gave me the details to understand the data returned by straty.pl  for Stanislaw. You World War II  military buffs take note !

Ok, but now I wanted to find which Stanislaw Elijasz of Pacanow, born on or about 17-APRIL-1906 was this data about. So I went to:

Small_3Geneteka.pl — to see if Stanislaw was indexed and what his birth record number (Akt #) might be to help me in my search of GenBaza.pl and to confirm the birth date. I found on result number 46,  a result for Stanislaw born in 1906 Pacanow with an Akt # 77. Now I had enough info to locate his birth record in:

Small_4

 GeneBaza.pl  — That link takes you directly to Stanislaw Elijasz, born in Pacanow on 17-April_1906, Akt #77 [assuming you have a GenBaza login id and you are logged in]. This gives the the church birth record image:

GenBaza_Stanislaw

Now we have a complete picture of our Polish ancestor by the mash-up of websites:

  1. straty.pl
  2. http://www.moosburg.org/info/stalag/laglist.html#generalgouvernement
  3. Geneteka.pl
  4. GeneBaza.pl
May 21, 2014

On The Trail Of Tomasz Leszczyński … #Genealogy, #Polish, #SNA

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

k_001494

Antonina Sieradzka 1862 Birth in Gorki

Yesterday, Stanczyk wrote about Tomasz and I provided an updated timeline of Tomasz Leszczynski  throughout much of his 104 year  lifespan. Today, I wanted to write a quick post about the affiliated families to the LESZCZYNSKI line.

If you have these surnames from the villages found below, then we need to compare research notes:

Surnames …

Kordos, Majer/Major, Ozarowicz, Fras/Frass,  Sieradzki, Slawinski, Pieszczochowicz/Pierzchowicz,  Mikniewicz   plus friends — Woloszyn, Stanek,  Pawelec, Fortuna and especially MIZDRAK.

I mention Mizdrak, because a Jozef Mizdrakborn 5-FEB-1834 in Wojcza,  Biechow parish. Seemed to be a part of the LESZCZYNSKI family records from 1860 through the death of Julianna Kordos Leszczynski in Pacanow,  27-NOV-1881 in Biechow parish. 47 years in the Leszczynski records in Poland.

Villages  …

Biechow  (including Piestrzec, Wojcza), Swiniary (including Oblekon), Pacanow,  Stopnica (including Falęcin), Strozyska (including Gorki)

May 20, 2014

Tomasz Leszczyński – de Biechów, Innkeeper, Shoemaker, Bourgeois Farmer — #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Tomasz LeszczynskiStanczyk’s  great-grandfather, Tomasz — Tomasz Leszczyński – de Biechów was an Innkeeper, a Shoemaker, and Bourgeois Farmer and these were just his listed occupations in the church records from Biechów, Pacanów, Stopnica. There is also a good bit of family lore surrounding Tomasz as well. For example, Tomasz lived to be 104 years old, he had two wives and 15 children via these two wives spanning 45 years of reproductive life — so indeed Tomasz was a productive and prolific man.

But it is the things about Tomasz that this jester does not know that obsess me. For example, I do not know Tomasz’s first marriage details. I wish I did then I would know with certainty his parents’ names. Or if I knew his birth details I could know his parents’ names and then locate his siblings, if any. I also need his death details too. At least then I would have an anchor point for his 104 year span of life then and that would lend me more info for deciding between various Tomasz contenders. The solace I have,  is that 15 births of children and some children’s deaths too have provided me with many data points with which to make inferences.  Even the two spouses’ births and deaths have provided data points.

So this jester is in the midst of performing a detailed SNA (social network analysis) also known as “cluster genealogy” of these data points. I will produce that and  write about my findings here when it is complete. At the UPGS conference, I was able to do research in a new village Wolica and I located a birth record for a Tomasz Leszczyński that fits data points. That led me to another village named Dzieraznia and yet another possible generation. At present I am only about 75-80% confident that I have the correct Tomasz, hence the SNA study. There is much work to do, but I have updated my Tomasz Leszczynski Timeline with many finds over the past couple years, including the finds from GenBaza.pl just this year when I located my paternal grandmother’s birth record! This grandmother of mine  (Walerya)  was Tomasz’s eldest child by his second wife Aniela Majer (aka Major)

September 24, 2013

The Library of Congress & PA State Library — #Genealogy, #Archives, #Libraries

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

PAStateLib_1PAStateLib_2

The Library of Congress

(LOC) has published a finding resource listing 71 links to the 50 states, online digital collections. That is found here .

The PA State Library — Has a digital collections, very similar to the digital collections found at seekingmichigan.org [Editor: also in LOC list for MI].

From Abe Lincoln, to Ben Franklin, to Coal Mining History, to WWI there are many PA treasures here:

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/collections/8728/digital_collections_at_the_state_library_of_pennsylvania/524375

I chose to start in their WWI Collection,  which had a few choices to pick from, so I chose the top pick (Mahanoy City):

American Red Cross. Pennsylvania Chapter. Mahanoy City. In Memoriam Of Those Who, Coming from the District within the Limits of the Mahanoy City, Red Cross Chapter, Quakake to Girardville [inclusive] Made the Supreme Sacrifice in the Great War for Democracy, known as “The World War” 1917-1919. Mahanoy City, Pa., [1920]
This is a six page memorial to the fallen veterans who lived in Mahanoy City in the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania.

http://accesspadr.org/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/sstlp-wwi&CISOPTR=411&CISOSHOW=405

In truth the PA State Library’s digital collection is large enough that this jester will need to spend some time exploring, but I thought I would share my initial impression.

So LOC, a tip of the jester’s hat  to you for compiling a very useful resource of state libraries who have online digital collections. These are historical in nature, but the obvious application to genealogy make these valuable resources to the genealogical researcher too.

September 15, 2013

Ancestry App v5.0 — #Genealogy, #Technology

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry5_0

Ancestry.com has updated their app to version 5.0 (iTunes App Store). I like their newest effort.  It looks nice and the User Experience (UX) is improved for the most part. I miss  having a button for showing just the lineal line (not siblings) to save space on the iPhone. Also the UX does not provide ways to go up or down your family tree other than what is displayed on screen (5 generations on iPhone). Why no arrows on top/bottom rows. You can of course click on someone higher up in the tree and see further back generations from that person, but you may not realize that there are prior generations unless you know your tree well. No visual key that more generations exist.

When you upgrade you will  need to download your whole tree again (does that imply their local db changed and needs to be reloaded?) and that takes about 30–45 seconds for a tree of 1,142 people. Small price to pay. I do wonder if the new app is causing problems for the Ancestry.com web site. It has performed slowly and sometimes the app says Ancestry.com is not available. Perhaps mobile app users are putting a bigger strain then online users.

AncestryError

Ancestry.com site problems?

It integrates more closely with Facebook. That did not appeal to me, but for some people it may be just what you want. As a result I do not know what happens when you connect your Facebook profile to a person in the tree (does it post the timeline to your Facebook timeline?).

Besides, Facebook, the app now integrates with Ancestry.com more completely. The app now works a lot like the web site. It does not appear to be missing any features. I like the new Timeline view of a profile … very nice.

The Gallery button on the bottom of the profile view quickly loads your images (much faster). It also automatically searches for hints too. Finally this view has a new feature to find sources (from Ancestry.com?) for your facts. Very nice.

The tight integration to the web site does mean the app switches control to a Safari web-app but the integration is so tight you might not notice the switch to Safari and back to the App

September 8, 2013

NCAA Football 2013 — Post Week 2 #BigTen, #B1G

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

WeekPostSo far the college football season has been great:  Clemson-Georgia, Georgia-SC, Michigan-Notre Dame, Florida-Miami, Texas-BYU, plus a few FBS teams beat FCS teams. Its early but how are things shaping up relative to inter-conference play ?

So far the Big 10 (which as twelve teams in contrast to the Big 12 which has ten teams — but ignore the names).

Big 10:   only three losses

ACC:      only five losses, beat the SEC in two head-to-head, two ACC-on-ACC, so three losses really

PAC 12:  only four losses, one of which was PAC12-on-PAC12, so lets call it three losses

SEC:       only six losses, two of which were SEC-on-SEC contests so lets call it four losses

Big 12:   only five losses, one of which was BIG12-on-BIG12 so really four losses

So Big 10,  ACC,  and PAC 12 are the leaders so far in inter-conference play. Who are soaking up the losses? American Athletic (9 losses, really 8),  Mid American (15, really 14), Conference USA (16, really 15), and the Independents (including Notre Dame) with only six teams have seven losses.

So it is this jester’s opinion that the National polls are skewed to the SEC (which to be fair has won the National Title so many years in a row). None the less, the rankings need to be re-balanced upon this season’s truth not on last season’s results.

Next Week …

No. 1 Alabama vs No. 7 Texas A&M  — Must see Game

No. 18 UCLA     vs No. 22 Nebraska   — Very Compelling Game

Tennessee at No. 2 Oregon

No. 3 Ohio State at California

No. 20 Washington at Illinois

Ole Miss at No. 15 Texas

No. 14 Notre Dame at Purdue

No. 21 Wisconsin at Arizona State

No. 8 Louisville at Kentucky

Boston College at No. 25 USC  — (only interesting ACC  inter-conference game)

A lot of Big 10 vs PAC 12 games this week.

 

My Picks …

Texas A&M over Alabama in an upset. TAMU is at home, but BAMA has had a week to prepare so it will be close. Alabama’s reign is over!

Nebraska over UCLA in a mild upset. Again Nebraska is at home and they have looked like a juggernaut. Nebraska has two games, but UCLA has two weeks to prepare. Stats slightly favor UCLA over Nebraska so I guess it is just the home field advantage I am hanging my hat on and Big Red having two games under its belt. Almost a toss-up.

Winners – Oregon,  Ohio State,  Notre Dame,  Wisconsin,  Louisville,

Toss Ups –  Washington/Illinois,  Ole Miss/Texas,   Boston College/USC

Wisconsin looks like Fielding Yost Point-A-Minute team, unscored upon so far. The biggest lock. It will be high scoring game (no defense played here unless it is by Wisconsin).

On the Toss-Ups take the home teams. USC must watch out for Boston College though.

September 1, 2013

Royal Vital Records — Prince George of Cambridge — #Genealogy, #Royalty

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

HRH_PrinceGeorgeDateline 22 July 2013  — City of Westminster, St Mary’s Hospital

Father: HRH Prince William Arthur Philip Louis

Mother: Catherine Elizabeth Middleton, HRH Duchess of Cambridge

Usual Address: Kensington Palace London

Filed 2nd August 2013 by William [signature]

Love the occupations !

Mom was born in Reading,   Dad was born in Paddington, Westminster

See Also …

British Royal Family Tree - 27th-July-2013

August 20, 2013

5 Reasons This Man Probably Isn’t 123 Years Old

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

20130820-193411.jpg

Carmelo Flores Laura

5 reasons this man probably isn’t 123 years old

Also see:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2013/08/20/5-reasons-this-man-probably-isnt-123-years-old/2676249/

Carmelo Flores –  according to Wikipedia, Bolivia did not start issuing birth certificates until 1940. So only baptismal records or other church records could substantiate this claim.

This may be the baptismal record as transcribed by Family Search:

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FJVL-F2K

It indicates a baptism on 16 Jul 1906 in San Andrés de Machaca, La Paz, Bolivia

⌛ Genealogists should be used to verify vital records.

#Genealogy #Proof lacking!

August 12, 2013

Oracle 12c – Multi-Tenant Databases — #STEM, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Oracle12c

Oracle 12c

Oracle’s newest database (version 12c) has many new features, the discussion of which are too big for a single blog article (or even a series of blogs). The substantial high-level bulleted list of new features is in the 12c New Features Manual . But the concepts and low level SQL language details show a much larger change then you might perceive.

Multitenant Database

The new paradigm shift, Multitenant Databases, will stop DBAs pretty quick, particularly in Windows where the installer creates a Container DB. Previous to 12c, all databases were Non-Container DBs. With 12c you can create a Non-Container DB or a Container DB. The Container DB can have zero, one, or more Pluggable DBs within. A Non-Container DB can never have a Pluggable DB. So that becomes an upfront database creation decision.

You can and you should read the Oracle Intro to Multitenant Databases .

I first relaized the Oracle Installer had created a container database for me when I went through the normal process of creating a database user using the same old techniques I always did and received an Oracle Error: ORA-65096. WHAM, I slammed right into the new paradigm without me even knowing it existed. The error description and the necessary action introduced to another part of the Multitenant Database paradigm: Comon User vs. Local User. That quickly led to Containers. Of course, with any new features, comes an array of new database schema tables like, v$pdbs for example. You will also probably use a new Sql*Plus command a LOT: SHOW CON_NAME to know what container (root or pluggable database) you are connected to. Some DBA commands must be done in the root container (CDB$ROOT). Your pluggable databases (in Windows) will be by default: PDB$SEED and PDBORCL. Every container database has precisely one seed pluggable database from which all pluggable databases are created from.

This paradigm shift will be  seriously disorienting feeling to long time DBAs, especially if were not aware this was coming. Fortunately, there are many DBA bloggers out there sharing their 12c experiences. They were a help for me to gather the necessary jargon. But it was not until I discovered that Oracle had created a tutorial on Multitenant Databases and I had spent an hour or two playing with the tutorial on my newly created sandbox database (on Windows) which was by default a Container DB. This tutorial is an excellent way to jump start your understanding of the new paradigm.

By the way, I think either the default should be a NON-CONTAINER DB (so you are backwards compatible) or the Oracle Intsaller needs to make it clear that a CONTAINER DB will require new DBA processes (i.e. a learning curve) and give you an OVERT option to create a NON-CONTAINER DB for backwards compatibility.

Conclusion

Read the Oracle Introduction to Multitenant Databases to understand the concepts. Then immediately work your way through the tutorial in a test database that is a Container DB. Ultimately, I think Container DBs are the way to go. I think this is what you want to do to implement a CLOUD or in a Virtualized Environment.

August 11, 2013

Pacanów Pomoc – #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has been a bit busy this past week with Oracle 12c (database) !   So forgive me if I play a bit of catch-up on my genealogy.

I have analyzed the data from GENEALODZY.PL in their GENESZUKACZ database for Pacanów Births (1875-1908). So now I need some help (pomoc). In my notes column I have noted the ELIASZ that I have in my family  -or- my guess. The empty notes fields are ELIASZ that I need help with. If you are a genealogist with these people in your family tree then please email me your info and if possible any images of church records or family photos.

 

Year

/ Rok

Rec#

/ Akt

Imię Nazwisko    NOTES
1 1875 110  Wacław Eliasz in my tree; son of Wojciech Eliasz & Agnieszka Pyszkow; [image]
2 1876 109  Marianna Eliasz daughter of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
3 1878 59  Katarzyna Eliasz
4 1879 20  Roman Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
5 1880 52  Jan Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
6 1880 160  Jan Eliasz My grand-uncle Jan; son of Jozef Eliasz & Marianna Paluch
7 1881 28  Jan Eliasz Martin Eliasz’s  (& Julianna Odomski) son
8 1881 30  Julianna Eliasz
9 1881 130  Tomasz Eliasz son of Ludwik & Elz. Miklaszewski
10 1882 128  Wincenty Eliasz son of Jozef Eliasz & Petronella Zwolski
11 1882 157  Marianna Eliasz Martin’s  (Julianna Odomski) daughter
12 1882 185  Katarzyna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
13 1883 25  Roman Eliasz
14 1884 33  Apolonia Eliasz Martin’s daughter
15 1884 71  Marianna Eliasz
16 1885 46  Józef Eliasz My Grandfather; Have Birth Record
17 1885 125  Marianna Eliasz
18 1886 189  Jan Eliasz
19 1886 238  Szczepan Eliasz
20 1888 104  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
21 1888 123  Teofila Eliasz
22 1889 71  Józefa Eliasz
23 1889 109  Antoni Eliasz ??possibly son of Ludwik & Elzbieta  M.
24 1890 24  Katarzyna Eliasz
25 1890 149  Marianna Eliasz
26 1890 181  Stanisław Eliasz Martin’s son, dies in Detroit (Stanislaw Elyasz in October 1923)
27 1891 186  Stanisław Eliasz
28 1891 190  Franciszka Eliasz
29 1892 68  Wincenty Eliasz
30 1892 83  Władysław Eliasz My Grand-Uncle
31 1892 206  Marianna Eliasz
32 1893 143  Anna Eliasz
33 1893 237  Marianna Eliasz
34 1893 261  Agnieszka Eliasz ??? Agnieszka Marianna E. that marries S. Hajek (Cleveland) ???
35 1895 30  Marianna Eliasz
36 1895 230  Tomasz Eliasz My Grand-Uncle (Dorota’s grandfather); Have birth record
37 1896 164  Wacław Eliasz
38 1897 8  Julianna Eliasz
39 1897 236  Julianna Eliasz A Grand-Aunt
40 1898 103  Anna Eliasz
41 1899 63  Balbina Eliasz
42 1899 79  Zygmunt Eliasz ??? Zygmunt Elijasz son Jozef E. & Theresa Siwiec??? PROBABLY not since Zygmunt was born in Biechow in 1898 (April 19)
43 1899 185  Aleksander Eliasz
44 1900 163  Julianna Eliasz
45 1901 84  Marcin Eliasz
46 1901 100  Anna Eliasz
47 1901 161  Marianna Eliasz
48 1901 164  Martin Eliasz
49 1903 95  Stanisława Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
50 1903 112  Helena Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
51 1903 175  Janina Eliasz one of these three is Emilja daughter of Jan/Pelagia
52 1905 96  Julianna Eliasz
53 1906 71  Wojciech Eliasz
54 1906 77  Stanisław Eliasz
55 1906 141  Edward,Jan Eliasz son of Jan Eliasz  & Pelagia z Kedzierski ?
56 1907 11  Julian Eliasz
57 1908 67  Kazimiera Eliasz
58 1908 124  Michalina Eliasz
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