Archive for August 6th, 2013

August 6, 2013

This Jester Has Been Consulting the Oracle — #STEM, #ILM, #ADO, #Oracle

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Dateline 06 Aug 2013 — 

OracleLogo
If you are the same age as Stanczyk, then when you see the acronym, ILM, you probably think of George Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic. But this article is about the Oracle of Larry Ellison. Oracle has released its latest version of its database, 12c, on June 25th, 2013.

So the ILM, of this blog is about Information Lifecycle Management. I thought you might need a buzz-word upgrade too — hence this blog. In the latest 12c, Oracle is advancing its ILM paradigm to make Automatic Data Optimization (ADO) a differentiator in Data / Databases. You see data storage is eating the planet or at least the IT budgets of many large companies. That Big Data has to live somewhere and the costs to house that data is very significant. Ergo, Oracle is giving you a way to  Tier your data storage  amongst differing costs media (hi to low) and using differing levels of compression, depending on your data’s lifecycle. Hence ILM.

ILM_ora

Source:  Oracle Documentation

The idea is that data ages from very active, to less active, to historical, to archival. You ideally would want to place the most active data on the fastest, most reliable, … most costly hardware. Likewise, as the data ages, it would be preferable to place on less costly storage devices or in a more compressed state to save space and costs. How can you do that effectively and without a large staff of IT professionals?  This is where the ADO comes in.

Using your familiar create table or alter table commands you can add an ILM policy to compress or relocate your data. Oracle provides segment level or  even row level granularity for these policies. How do you know what data is active vs inactive? Oracle has implemented a HEAT_MAP facility for detecting data usage. HEAT_MAP is a db parameter. Set it on in your init.ora file or via an alter session command in sql*plus (to do it on a session basis instead of database wide.

 ALTER SESSION SET HEAT_MAP=ON;

You can check on things via:

 SELECT * FROM V$HEAT_MAP_SEGMENT;

There is even a PL_SQL stored package:  DBMS_HEAT_MAP.

So this is a quick update on ILM, ADO, and HEAT_MAP in Oracle 12c database. Go to the Oracle yourself and see what you can get on this new technology.

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