Archive for January, 2012

January 30, 2012

Genealogy This Week … #Genealogy, #Technology, #Polish, #GroundHog

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

To Stanczyk, it appears that 2012 has gotten off to a sluggish start (genealogically speaking). How about for you genealogists (email or comment)? Well that is all about to change !   Lisa Kudrow‘s Who Do You Think You Are?, returns this Friday with Martin Sheen as the subject.

RootsTech 2012 kicks off this week too. Did you notice, they have an app (its free) for that? Even better they will STREAM some of the conference for the benefit of all genealogists !   Kudos to Roots Tech — All Conferences (genealogical or not should do these two things: app and stream conference proceedings). This should definitely jump start genealogy.

Read these blogs. Yes, I am telling you its ok to read other blogs than this one. These people are “official Roots Tech bloggers”.

I discovered that I missed one of my holiday blogs (in my backlog) about the happy married couples in Pacanów parish from 1881. So I will post the names of 40 Happy couples and what record # (Akt #) they are in the Pacanów parish church book.  This is two years after my great-grandparents got married, but there is still a Jozef & Mary who are getting married (Jozef Elijasz). I once had to sort out the two Jozef Elijasz from 1879 and the one from 1881 who all married women named Mary in the village of Pacanów! Genealogy is hard.

Oh and Punxsutawney Phil will make an appearance this week and offer his weather prognostication skills (I really think his predecessor Pete was much better and more alliterative too). I am pretty sure Phil & Pete are German, so you will need a German genealogy site for their lineage. Quaint tradition (Pennsylvania), dragging a Ground Hog from its home to ask him about weather. I think Bill Murray’s movie captured it well. So be careful what you do this week, or you may be repeating it a few times.

January 27, 2012

Pathways & Passages – Journal of PGSCT&NE — #Polish, #Genealogy, #Society

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, thinks he just got the new issue of Pathways & Passages. I’m not certain because it says 2011 on the cover and in the page footers. But of course, who doesn’t have a hard time writing the new year on their checks.

That aside, their column, “Online Resources” was particularly good this issue (whichever it was, Summer 2011 -or- Summer 2012).

For the PA Polonia …

They had two online resources. For Schuykill County, PA (moje zona has family from that county — in fact I stumbled upon this site a few years ago). So I can state it is a very good from my own experience.

They did mention Lackawanna County, PA (but did not give the URL — so off to Google for you). There are marriages: 1885-1995 and an index to wills.

The Next Online Resources …

Passaic County, NJ – Naturalizations.  This turned out to be an EXCELLENT find! I found a Jozef Zwolski  whose ship manifest I had found before. Now Jozef was a brother of Roman Zwolski and both of these men are sons Jan Zwolski & Petronella Elijasz ! They happen to be from both Biechow & Pacanow parishes. Joseph’s Declaration of Intent was listed and you could view the image (and download a PDF of the document)! So I now have a birthday for Joseph and it matches up well to his ship manifest and his residences in Russian-Poland match up well too — so I am pretty convinced I have my ancestor.

Joseph apparently served in WWI and is taking advantage of privileges as a citizen soldier to become an American.

Antwerp Police Immigration Index. This last resource given, I would not have thought to look into (not having any Belgians in my direct lineage). But apparently, if you stayed longer than normal before your passage to American (from Antwerp port), you had to register with Antwerp Police. A good many Polish must have fell into that category. I did not find any of mine, but did find some whose last names match those in my family tree. If you do find your ancestor — you have a name and a village to ascertain that you have the correct person. But you will gain a birthday. This is another nice database from  FamilySearch.org.

I am glad I belong to some of the various Polish Genealogical Societies — these little resources sometimes pay big dividends.

January 26, 2012

Pennsylvania, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 — #PA, #Genealogy, #Jewish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Ancestry.com in a partnership with one of Stanczyk’s favorite Genealogy/History Libraries in the USA – Historical Society of Pennsylvania  -
1300 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA  19107-5699

Published data: “Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania”.

Contrary to what you might think from the title, included amongst the denominations of material are Jewish Collections. My wife’s family has connection to two of Philadelphia’s oldest synagogues: Mikveh Israel & Rodeph Shalom which are in this new Ancestry database. While the resources lack what we are looking for in this new database, it is still encouraging to see some HSP collections in Ancestry.com.  I still prefer to go to the HSP in person — what a resource for genealogists who have ancestors from the earliest days of colonial America.

The moral of this story is not to just accept (or reject) a database on the basis of its name. Look deeper!

January 24, 2012

Genealogy 2012 – State of the Union

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

If you follow Stanczyk‘s posts, then you know the first 2012 Genealogical Website Ratings were published yesterday. I wanted to follow-up on that article’s meme with yet a further muse.

The ratings show that there was quite a bit of a shuffling around. Overall though, genealogy websites are nascent. That is my meme for today:  The State of Genealogy is Very Good and Is Improving. In a little over a week, RootsTech 2012 conference will happen. The convention shows many of the top web sites are attending: Ancestry.com, Fold3.com, FamilySearch.org, Mocavo.com, LegacyFamilyTree, MyHeritage, RootsMagic, Geni.com, AgesOnline, etc. In the middle of this conference, the “Who Do You Think You Are“, show will debut (3-Feb-2012). Late March brings us PBS’s “FINDING YOUR ROOTS…” So the first quarter looks promising. Do you doubt this jester?

Perhaps the Baron’s Online article, ” ‘Tis the Season For Ancestry.com” will convince you. Bob O’Brien (the author) analyzes  the stock performance of Ancestry in light this convergence. He does not reference RootsTech nor PBS — but this jester does. Also adding to the synergy for 2012 Genealogy is the release of the 1940 US Census on April 2. So 2012 has all the makings for genealogy’s best year ever. Baron’s does mention the 1940 Census too.

Now a successful business climate for genealogy – software, hardware, and services can only mean many good things will be coming for us genealogists. Let me urge you to greater heights in your research by lending your efforts in your research and also in collaborating on the Internet. We can all push our own research (and of course those distantly related to us) forward and ride the rising tides of the 2012 Genealogy Surge.

For good measure the biennial United Polish Genealogical Societies Conference in late April is also happening this year. So Polish Genealogy should be able to ride the tide of popularity too.

RootsTech looks like it will have its emphasis on the Internet with its evolving collaborative tools (social networks, HTML5, new databases, blogs, developer tools/frameworks/standards to enhance the collaborative/connection making nature of genealogy and provide richer search/match tools/techniques, etc.). Catch this break-out year!

That’s the Meme – The State of Genealogy in 2012 is very promising.

January 23, 2012

2012 1st Quarter – Genealogy Website Rankings — #Genealogy, #Rankings, #Website

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Welcome to Stanczyk’s  2012 First Quarter Genealogy Website Rankings. I know I am a week early — c’est la vie! Since my last rankings an array of rank postings [uh, pun partly intended] have appeared. Stanczyk has also received exactly one request for inclusion in his rankings, from .. Tamura Jones about his website: www.tamurajones.net [#58 on the new Rankings]. He also has a worthy Twitter page too. Keep sending in recommendations — I will keep thinking about them or including them if they are worthy. I liked Tamura’s stuff so MUCH, that I added his genealogy page to my blogroll [Modern Software Experience at the right].

I really liked the survey from the Canadian website: Genealogy In Time. I added their magazine/website (#13)  as well to my rankings.  I found them because they produced an excellent Genealogy Website Ranking (mid January 2012), that included a very thorough discussion of their methodology. They neglected a few Polish Websites that SHOULD have made their list. Also they list Ancestry.com in all of its many global incarnations and this eats up an unnecessary number of the top 125 poll slots.   But aside from those minor criticisms, their rankings is very GLOBAL and very good. Who knew there was a Chinese (make sense, considering their billion plus citizens and their excellent genealogical records) genealogy website or a Finnish website too in the top 125???

OK, Stanczyk will keep his Rankings  list, because of the emphasis on Polish / Slavic genealogical websites. Stanczyk also has many in the range 100-125 that are very useful though not popular enough to be the Genealogy in Time Rankings. However, the Genealogy-In-Time-Poll, makes a very useful tool in another way. They have graciously included the website links (URLs) of each site, making it rather easy to build a genealogical Favorites/Bookmarks list that is broadly useful. Stanczyk admits to his list being somewhat selective in the lower 1/3 in order to be more valuable to Polish Researchers (in particular to English speaking, though not exclusively so). On a personal note, this blog you are reading is in the top 5.8Million (of all websites world-wide) and is #120 on my Website rankings — come on readers give me a boost, please!

Needless to say, all website rankings I read, agree on the top 20-40 websites (putting aside the multiple listing of Ancestry.com).

Here is a snippet of the Rankings and the rest are on the Rankings Page:

January 22, 2012

Writers & Other Citers Alike Take Note …

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

tanczyk hopes you are citing sources for your facts (minimally in the areas of conjecture). Trust me if you ever want to go back and revisit a “fact” and reconsider that fact in light of new evidence/”facts” you will be glad to know where you got that “fact”/notion from.

Perhaps you do not wish to aspire to Elizabeth Shown Mills level of documentation, but some level of citation is de rigeur.

Well at any rate, Thomas MacEntee at Geneabloggers posted a great link: The Genealogy Source Citation Quick Reference Card at is a quick overview with information on a citation quick reference (a PDF document) that includes links to Bibliography Builders (online) and asked for us to pass it on — consider it done Thomas.

January 21, 2012

PA-Luzerne County-Wilkes Barre: Polish Genealogical Roundtable Today (1/21/2012)

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk, has been culling through his iGoogle page and Google News page on genealogy for things to do. Sorry for the last minute notice (it was just published today). Here is one local to the Greater Philadelphia area:

The Luzerne County Historical Society (LCHS)  is holding a roundtable discussion on Polish genealogical research from 10 a.m. to noon 1/21/2012 at the LCHS’s museum, 69 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Call 570-822-1727 or email mrkburke@luzernehistory.org for reservations.

Discussion leaders are:  Hania Wictzak, a native of Poland & Polish history, culture and genealogy expert,  Anthony Paddock, a researcher who compiled the histories of Sacred Heart of Jesus Parochial School, Dupont, & Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Avoca,  and Joseph Habersky, retired high school science teacher & grandson of Polish immigrants and amateur genealogist.

On 1/28/2012, there will be two more programs: Polish Stories and Crafts for Children, ages 4 to 10, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. and a Polish Costume Embroidery discussion and demonstration by Alice Rae Kutish  in Luzerne County exhibit gallery from 1 to 3 p.m.

January 19, 2012

Washington Monument Repairs Given a Boost by David M. Rubenstein

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Congratulations to  David M. Rubenstein! This patriotic philanthropist has donated $7.5 Million for the repair of our national symbol, the Washington Monument. Mr Rubenstein a self-described history buff has a long history himself in supporting American Institutions. In 2008, he was the man who  purchased the Magna Carta (an early version) and he has put that Magna Carta on permanent loan to the National Archives. Besides being a history buff and philanthropist, he is a magna cum laude graduate of Duke University and the co-founder and Managing Director of The Carlyle Group.

As you may recall, the monument was damaged by the Aug. 23, 2011, 5.8-magnitude earthquake that shook the east coast of the USA. As a result, the monument is currently closed while it is being repaired.

Source:Billionaire to Donate $7.5 Million to Repair Washington Monument“, 18-January-2012, New York Times, Politics Page.

January 19, 2012

Genealogy and Its Popularity – #Genealogy, #Media

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk has maintained for a few years that genealogy as a hobby ranks second only to gardening as a hobby engaged in by Americans. Perhaps this is the year we begin the assault on the number one spot.

If you love genealogy (and I assume you do because you read this blog) and/or history and biographies, then 2012 is your year! Of course we all look forward to Lisa Kudrow’s annual send-up, “Who Do You Think You Are?“.

Who Do You Think You Are, the American genealogy documentary series on NBC returns on February 3, 2012.  The third season will have shows on:  Marisa Tomei,  Rob Lowe,  Paula Deen,   Rashida Jones,   Jerome Bettis,   Reba McEntire,   Helen Hunt,   Edie Falco,   Rita Wilson,   Jason Sudeikis,   Martin Sheen  and   Blair Underwood.

URL:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Do_You_Think_You_Are%3F_%28U.S._TV_series%29#Season_3_.282012.29

On PBS, if we can divert you from Downton Abbey,  we have “FINDING YOUR ROOTS WITH HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR.which premiers Sunday, March 25th.  This 10-part series will delve into the genealogy and genetics of famous Americans. Dr. Gates will cover the family trees of:  Kevin Bacon, Robert Downey, Jr., Branford Marsalis, John Legend, Martha Stewart, Barbara Walters and Rick Warren, among  others in this 10-part series. Make sure you watch Martha’s show — she’s   a  Kostyra [i.e. Polish] !

URL: http://www.pbs.org/about/news/archive/2011/winter-spring-2012/

Do not forget that  BYU  TV channel  of course has an ongoing genealogy show (The Generations Project). This channel is not available everywhere (yet)  — check it out.

URL:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BYU_Television

So this jester maintains that genealogy is even more popular than ever!   What do you think?

January 18, 2012

Name Changer – Eliasz becomes Eliasz-Solomon – #Polish, #Jewish, #Catholic, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk like almost all genealogists wrestles with names. What is in a name? Well if your name has Slavic roots then your name will be like a Polish sausage made from a family recipe, with no two ever completely alike. As a jester, I could appreciate John Ryś ‘s article, “Dealing With Sound Equivalents in the Polish Language“, from the PGSA’s Fall 2011 Rodziny journal, pages 20-22. What caught my eye and my heart’s fancy was the sub-title, “How Can One Possibly Misspell a Simple Three-Letter Name…”. Indeed! This jester empathizes with John Ryś. My own family, as I have always joked about, is very unlike Polish names. Look it has three vowels … out of six letters !  How could you possibly misspell that ??? Well this is about names — but not their difficulty or their many misspellings for which Slavic names are legendary — a real genealogical nightmare.

This article is about name changes. Let me just state up front, that my own name has been changed. As of 10-January-2012, my family has legally changed its name and is hence forth called:  ELIASZ-SOLOMON. This jester “hyphenated” his name to reflect and to honor my wife’s family. Her name became inverted from Solomon-Eliasz to Eliasz-Solomon so that all of us in the burgeoning family of ours (including our sons) would have the same name, spelled the same way. What’s in our name?

Let me break it down this way. ELIASZ (also spelled Elijasz, Heliasz, and Eljasz — misspelled/mistranscribed too many ways to enumerate) is Polish for ‘ELIJAH’ the prophet from the Old Testament who was translated by God. You might think it is a Jewish name since that is its etymology. If it is so, I have not found it to be so for my family for whom I have Catholic records back into the 1690’s. There are in fact Jewish Eliasz (and many other variations besides those listed above) and I have often remarked on this fact to my father. For it was common for Jewish families when they were forced to adopt permanent family names to select a family name from the Bible. That leads me to the second/Jewish part of my name, SOLOMON. Everybody, just about the whole world, knows that SOLOMON is from the great, wise king SOLOMON (third and last king of the unified kingdom of Israel). Solomon in America, is the reverse of Eliasz. It is mostly a Jewish family name, although there a good number of Anglo-Saxon Solomons (usually spelled Salomon or Soloman). Of course, the Jewish and the Christian versions of the Solomon name are often spelled the other way engendering more confusion on the name.

So we are a PROPHET-KING family  name now.

Now most Central European genealogists, know our ancestors changed their names quite often, to our dismay — since there was no Internet to record these changes and make them public for future genealogists. In my own family lines through just my paternal grandmother alone, we see that LESZCZYNSKI (also a king name) became LESTER. We also see that SOBIESZCZANSKI became SOBB. So name changes are nothing new for my family (and I assume for yours as well). In fact,  name changes have been happening for a long while. Recall that JACOB had his name changed to ISRAEL (“wrestles with God”).

Contrary to popular notion our ancestors did not change their name going through Ellis Island. Your name coming into the USA had to match the ship manifest and ticket,  so no names were changed (although I am quite sure that some Americans came here under an assumed name — using the tickets purchased by another person). The most common way was to change the name on the NATURALIZATION papers (which is no doubt how the mis-notion of changing the name coming from Ellis Island started). My own aunt Alice was Aleksandra on the Ship manifest (1913) and on US Censuses until she changed her name when she became a US Citizen and adopted Alice.  Our ancestors did a name change to  “Americanize” their names, often quite humorous in their attempt to do so.

Of course, for centuries women have changed their names when they got married. Now a days, women and men adopt hyphenated family names at marriage. It is unclear what the next generation afterwards will do when two already hyphenated people marry; as it seems unlikely they will adopt a four name hyphenation as a family name out of a practical matter (computer systems hate extremely long names — just look at the social network software: Facebook or Twitter). So name changes will become a regular hurdle for modern genealogists to get over (particularly so when one considers divorce rates).

Here is a little info for genealogists unfamiliar with the process:

  1. A petition is filed with the court (in the county where the person lives)
  2. The name change is published in two newspapers (pre-determined by the court)
  3. A judge will issue a decree declaring the name change

Afterwards, the normal paper records will document the name evolution from old name to new name for the individual. But it will be best to check both names. Besides court records or newspapers, I have seen the name change annotated in church records too!

So future descendants whoever you may be. Be forewarned, ELIASZ-SOLOMON was once ELIASZ or SOLOMON. That should be obvious. But for my descendants and my wife, Tereza,  it all started in 10-January-2012 — please take note. I am also offering an apology to future genealogists for further muddying the waters on whether or not the name is Catholic or Jewish — just deal with it. Legal Decrees are shown below …

C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Tereza D. Eliasz-Solomon

January 14, 2012

Poland 1794, The Tempest, & Catherine The Great – #Polish, #Genealogy, #History

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk’s blog has a blog roll that includes the talented, Donna Pointkouski’sWhat’s Past is Prologue”. Her blog’s title is from Shakespeares’ play, “The Tempest”. Today’s article is NOT a paean to her fine works, nor to Shakespeare really though this jester has a fondness for the bard – I know I’ve said that before.

Ok, get out your Shakespeare’s 1st Folio and follow along. You will not have to flip too far. The Tempest is the first play in the tome. Just do it. Donna’s quote (“What’s Past is Prologue”) comes from Act II, Scene 1 and is said by Antonio. Today’s article is about Act I, Scene I and how that scene appears in another case of life imitating art. Never fear this is an historical tale from Russian Poland …

Dateline – Easter Week 1794. Poland has already been partitioned twice, the second time was just last year (1793) following the War of the Second Partition. The Empress of Russia is Ekaterina (Catherine) the Great. This Tsarina seems to have had a ‘soft spot” for the Polish diplomat and it was her seduction of Stanislaw August Poniatowski, whom she had caused to be installed as the last elected King of Poland that brought us to this day. It was Poniatowski’s duplicity in trying to move Poland closer to his lover’s Russian Empire that led to the Four Year Sejm only the Empress did not want Poland to re-arm nor Poland’s help in suppressing Turkish aggressions. So the Sejm left to itself,  enacted the world’s  2nd Democratic Constitution on May 3rd, 1791 which led to the War of the Second Partition and finally the 2nd partition in 1793. Violence begets violence and so we find ourselves here Easter Week 1794.

Tadeusz Kosciuszko emboldened by his success in the American Revolution, leads a successful Insurrection in Krakow, where his heroic charge against the Russian General Tormasov results in the capture of the Russian cannons and defeat for the Russian General and his overly small force. This victory results in the ensuing liberation of Warsaw followed by Wilno. Thereby commencing a killing spree led by a tailor whose name (ironically in English) is Jan Kilinski and also by the Guild of Slaughterers (the fascinating occupations of our ancestors). The Russian Ambassador in Warsaw was able to flee eastward across the Vistula bridges[1] just ahead of the Insurrection.

However, the remainder of the Russian sympathizers who were too slow to follow the Russian Ambassador were summarily tried and hung by the Insurrection Council and/or by angry mobs. Amongst those fleeing, was a certain Hetman named Szymon Kossakowski who was caught trying to escape by boat …

Kossakowski  was caught and hanged under the rather literate inscription, “He who swings will not drown.” [1] .

Now compare that quote to Shakespeare’s text in “The Tempest”, published in the 1st Folio in 1623[2]  (performed prior to that publishing in 1610/1611). Near the end of Act I, Scene I  Gonzalo says, “He’ll be hanged yet, though every drop of water swear against it …[3]  .  That scene also contained more dialog about the loathsome boatswain being hanged rather than drowning.

Now we have arrived at the point of Stanczyk’s thesis. That Poland’s rebels were literate and familiar with Shakespeare’s Tempest. They cleverly used this paraphrase in proper context and it was directed at Poniatowski and of course the hangings left no doubt what would happen to other Russian sympathizers when caught. How do I come to suppose such a thing?

Poniatowski, despite his flaws was linguistically talented and mastered many languages, including English due to his mentorship in Russia by the British Ambassador, Sir Charles Hanbury-Williams, who was responsible for introducing Poniatowski to the Russian Empress[4].  Poniatowski was so enamored of the bard he erected a statue at Lazienki Palace of Shakespeare[5] ! Poniatowski’s brother, Michal Poniatowski (a Polish Primate) committed suicide rather than meet his fate at the hands of the Insurrection Council. So the Primate knew more certainly than most what Kossakowski’s hanging meant to all Russian sympathizers.

The Insurrection was short lived and was put down by the Catherine the Great and her Russian Generals. This historical story is what led to the third Partition of Poland.

However, it appears 171 years was ample time for the 1st Folio to be transported to Poland, translated to Polish and understood and used in appropriate context during a rebellion. So Stanczyk lays the events of Easter Week 1794 squarely at the foot of Stanislaw August Poniatowski, including the rebels literate scholarship, and the resulting third Partition of Poland which made Poland’s borders (not her people or her culture) disappear for 123 years (1795-1918). Poniatowski had to abdicate in 1795 (at the 3rd Partition) and he died 3 years later … in St Petersburg, Russia.

Catherine The Great : Portrait of a Woman

I’ll have you know that today’s article was inspired by my wife, Tereza. She is reading the above named book  by Robert K. Massie and because she knows my interest in and knowledge of matters about Poland and our shared Slavic genealogies, we have had many wonderfully animated conversations about this book she is reading.  It was nice for her to hear another viewpoint and for me to be further informed by Massie’s scholarly work. We both recommend the book to biography/history readers. My wife reads the book as Catherine, and Stanczyk pretends he is Potemkin !!!

;-)

That is my meme for today.

References

[1] Norman Davies, “God’s Playground”, Volume 1,  2005 Revised Edition, pages 406, 407.

[2] Editor, G. Blakemore Evans, “The Riverside Shakespeare”, page 56.

[3] Edited by Cross & Brooke, “Yale Shakespeare, Complete Works”,  2005 Edition, page 1407.

 [4] Robert K. Massie, “Catherine The Great: Portrait Of A Woman”,  2011  1st Edition, page 175.

[5] Czeslaw Milosz, The History of Polish Literature”, page 169.

January 13, 2012

Pacanow Marriage Statistics 1878-1884 – #Polish, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Stanczyk is obsessed with learning and understanding his ancestral villages. To that end, I spent the latter part of December analyzing the marriage records of Pacanów parish. As regular readers may know, Pacanów was in the Russian-Poland partition in the old gubernia (wojewodztwo/woj.) of Kielce which is north-east of today’s Krakow, Poland.  Pacanów  is now in the woj. of Swieto Krzyskie.

Today I have a graphic of a spreadsheet of the data I collected. Besides providing some demographics by the villages that made up the parish of Pacanów, it also gives you an inkling of the villages that comprise the parish [it may not be an exhaustive list]. You should also be aware that Catholic parish boundaries changed over time, just as they do today. So parish and dioceses may be different from earlier periods and also from those of the present time.

This was also an excellent exercise in practicing reading, transliterating, and translating Russian/Cyrillic to the Latin-based Polish alphabet. As always, the handwriting of the priest , the quality of the paper/book/ink  and even the original scanning of the church records affects your paleographic efforts. So scanning church records for a limited set of proper nouns can improve your paleographic/translating skills. After all, I know the noun has to be a village on the map (some map from that time period) so even difficult paleographic challenges can usually be resolved.

Results of Marriage Statistics

1878-1884 Pacanow Parish Marriage Stats By Village

For indexing/scanning purposes the villages are:

Karsy Duzy, Karsy Maly, Kepa Lubawska, Komorow, Kwasow, Niegoslawcie, Pacanow, Rataje, Slupia, Sroczkow, Szczeglin, Zabiec

I did not include Folwark Dolne as that is a manor house/ estate, (more so than an actual village).

January 12, 2012

Happy New Year – ???

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Please forgive Stanczyk for an extended leave of absence. Literally, I have been mailing it (er emailing it in). So let me wish everyone a belated Happy New Year, 2012 (appropriate kind of since this is the twelfth day)!

This year I still have a backlog of comments and research to get to.

I missed a few things that I had wished to blog about. Today’s blog was written two days before Christmas (2011) during Waclaw Hawel’s funeral. So please forgive me for such a belated remembrance …

(but this jester could not just let this pass)

Waclaw Hawel  born (ur.) 5 October 1936 –  died (zm.) 18 December 2011

Vaclav Hawel

Seldom do the deaths of leaders abroad touch upon the American psyche. Certainly the death the year before, 10 April 2010, of the Polish President Lech Kaczynski and many of the Polish leadership who died ironically attempting to reach Russia to commemorate Katyn.  It only reached those of the  Polish American intelligentsia and there but briefly.

To be sure when the much beloved Princess Diana perished in the Parisian car wreck or when the Blessed Pope John Paul II died in Rome, America wept and grieved in a prolonged period of mourning.

For Saddam Hussein, there was nothing but contempt and a distant, removed interest in whether a hanged dictator soiled his clothing at the moment of death. This year, the heroic, action-justice drama of killing bin Laden drew a strong response of pent-up justice delayed and spontaneous joy in the American streets at its long last rendering. But that was short lived. The many spelled Libyan madman, Khadaffi barely registered any interest in his You-Tube video death and even the Hague seemed uninterested in the manner of death. The North-Korean tyrant Kim Jong Il died this week and again America’s disinterest was palpable – though the choreographed grief seemed to  reach the starving North Koreans. It was however quipped that the Wicked & Evil Convention in Hell This Year will have a longer than usual “Memorial Reel”.

However, Waclaw Havel even though his death happened simultaneously with the nuclear armed Korean tyrant, there is a growing swell of recognition for the Czech. Perhaps less than Princess Diana or Blessed Pope John Paul II – but his diverse talent as a literati seems to have lifted this world leader to some prominence here in the USA.

Theaters in Philadelphia are performing his absurdest works. Obvious this author is chronicling his impact in death and contrasting his death with others on some kind of cosmic scale. Others too, in fact  Harper’s Magazine, December 2011 issue, on page 94 in the article, “Speakeasy” there was a mention of Hawel’s “literocracy” and an interesting comparison to Hemingway/post-WWI-Paris. Let the Waclaw Hawel meme live .. on !

There is no doubt that Waclaw Hawel and his “Velvet Revolution” are linked with Lech Walesa / Solidarność, or Blessed Pope John Paul II for their role in opposing tyranny and bringing about an end to European Totalitarianism that had lingered on for far too long after World War II. So as each of these giants of the Greatest Generation pass it is a mix of sadness for their passing and celebration  for their efforts  lifting us out of oppression and restoring our freedoms. Still most Americans will not know of Waclaw Hawel as the Czech Republic President and/or playwrite/author and wonder at Europe’s huge outpouring of grief – but his passing is noted and his greatness is remarked upon and undeniably he left the world a better place for his efforts and his having lived.

So Waclaw Hawel it is fitting that the cosmic scale finds you a weighty, worthy soul. May God rest and lighten your immortal soul!

–Stanczyk

Next … Pacanow Marriage Stats

January 7, 2012

OH – Cleveland/Cuyahoga County Eliasz/Elijasz #Polish, #Genealogy

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

Yesterday in the blog, Stanczyk emailed in an Ancestry database of note. They had an index of Marriages from Cuyahoga County, OH (the Cleveland area) 1810-1973. Most of these are marriage returns from the officiant and list little more than the bride, groom and marriage date and the officiant. Some do in fact list ages of the bridal party or their residences and even two of mine had the parent names.

Now this plays into an earlier blog article of mine about the Cleveland Eliasz/Elijasz, asking for any ancestors to write this jester and discuss family trees. [None so far.]

I was hoping for and found the marriage record of Stanislas Hajek and Agnes Eliasz ! Of all the Cleveland Eliasz/Elijasz this marriage was most convincing to me that they are relatives,as both Stanislas and Agnes (Agnieszka) were from Pacanow, which is my grandfather’s birth village. From a Polish Genealogical Society website (genealodzy.pl) email I received from a Baran, whose grandmother was an Eliasz, and from Ship Manifests, I was able to place this Agnes Eliasz in my family tree as a daughter of Jozef Eliasz & Theresa Siwiec (whose direct line ancestor a while ago sent me my grandparent’s marriages records – civil and church).

Truly the Internet makes this world a smaller place. So today, I am transcribing the married couples from the Cuyahoga County, OH marriages returns of 1913 on the same page with Stanislas Hajek & Agnes Eliasz (from page 193):

Michael Blatnik & Mary Hocevar August 25th, 1913 [#21537]
John Spisak & Veronika Busoge August 25th, 1913 [#21538]
Joseph Wisniewski & Frances Kotecka August 25th, 1913 [# 21539]

Stanislas Hajek & Agnes Eliasz August 25th, 1913 [# 21540]

George Csepey & Helen Weiszer August 26th, 1913 [# 21541]

Boleslas Zaremba & Alexandra Alicka August 26th, 1913 [# 21542]

Louis Rutkowski & Anna Solecka August 26th, 1913 [# 21543]

Aloys Salak & Anna Pisek August 26th, 1913 [# 21544]

Almost all of them look Slavic and most of those names are Polish. Cleveland, a large GreatLakeCity, an American enclave of Poliana in the early 20th century.

Related Ancestry DBs:
US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County, Jewish Marriage Record Extracts, 1837-1934
Ohio Marriage Index, 1970, 1972-2007
Ohio Marriages, 1803-1900
Ohio Divorce Index, 1962-1963, 1967-1971, 1973-2007

Enjoy!

January 6, 2012

Ancestry – Cuyahoga County, OH Marriage Indexes

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1876&enc=1

The above link is to:
Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973

This database in Ancestry.com has been recently updated to over 1.8 Million records and I had many ancestros (and potential ancestors) listed amongst the married couples. It is worth a look for Polish people or people with roots in Ohio and specifically Cleveland or Cuyahoga County OH.

January 1, 2012

Stanczyk 2011 In Review – #Genealogy, #Polish

by C. Michael Eliasz-Solomon

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Syndey Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 8,300 times in 2011. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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